Jump to content

Bryony Brind RIP, December 2015


Recommended Posts

I have just read the following sad news on the Dance Europe FB Page.

 

With much sadness we pass on the news of the death of Bryony Brind, the former Royal Ballet principal dancer, who suffered a heart attack after a short illness and passed away last Wednesday. She was 55 years old. Deborah Weiss will be writing an obituary for the next issue of Dance Europe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good Heavens! And she was only 55. What hope for the rest of us? All those postings about Sleeping Beauty reminded me of her debut as Aurora. She was a very distinctive and individual dancer and I will spend some time thinking over my memories of her.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How very sad. I still remember the excitement generated by her 1981 debut in Swan Lake (not withstanding slipping over as she rushed too hastily to protect her Swans in Act 2) and then being chosen to partner Nureyev, despite the fact that she was rather too tall for him, in Bayadère. Im also sure, unlikely as it might seem from the size perspective, that she was partnered by David Wall in his last few weeks as a full time member of the RB in Beauty, don't know if anything else quite lived up to those thrills and a difficult run in Ballet Imperial apparently affected both her personal confidence and managent's confidence in her but relatively late in her Covent Garden career I did see her as a memorably affecting Giselle, capturing an intriguing mixture of fragility and vitality in Act 1 and a really other worldly delicacy in Acr 2. She certainly had a magic about her and even if eariy promise wasn't entirely fulfilled she will be remembered fondly by many who saw her dance who will also mourn her untimely passing.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So shocked. She was the same age as me and I followed her career with such excitement - first Swan Lake so young, etc. She once gave me two signed pairs of her ballet shoes, one for me and one for my sister - she brought them down to me at the old stage door at the ROH with a lovely postcard she'd written. She was so sweet. She had a fragility and intensity that made her compelling to watch, as well as the most beautiful lines, long and yearning and sometimes a bit uncertain, like a young colt. Huge eyes and such immediacy to her dancing. So very sad. Rest in Peace.

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, my goodness, what an awful shock. I remember some of her work back in the early 80s when we'd just moved to the USA and I was still trying to keep up with what the company was doing.

 

I still have a copy of The Colourful World of Ballet, from the late 1970s, where she and another RBS student were featured in an appendix showing all the basic ballet steps. It said that they were first-year upper-school students. I always think of her as that teenage student demonstrating the steps in that book.

Edited by Melody
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Shocked to hear this: I think her time at the RB was coming to an end about the time I started watching the company, and I don't think I ever saw her dance, but I know how highly many people thought of her.

 

My deepest condolences to her family and friends.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Still reeling from the shock of hearing this news yesterday when my friend, David Peden, posted it on Facebook.  Since then, tributes have been pouring in from all over the world from dancers of her generation and it appears that no-one knew she was ill as it has come as a huge shock to everyone.  It is very fitting that Deborah Weiss will write Bryony's obituary as they were in the same year at the Royal Ballet School.  I remember  Bryony when she first started in the Royal Ballet and of course she had only been in the corps de ballet for a short while when Nureyev chose her as his partner for his Royal Ballet comeback.  I was there for her debut in "Swan Lake" (and I, too, remember her landing on her backside when she ran in to protect her swans but she impressed by immediately springing back to her feet and carrying on as if nothing had happened), her debut in "La Bayadere" and many more.  She was a favourite muse for Michael Corder when he choreographed for the company in the 1980s.  He created an exquisite pas de deux for her in "L'Invitation au voyage" and then a very different type of dancing for her in "Party Game".  Sadly, MacMillan did not use her for his new works, preferring the divine Alessandra Ferri, and so she was rather sidelined after the brilliant start to her career.  I did not know her very well but we often ended up in the same tube carriage on the journey from Baron's Court to Covent Garden and would exchange greetings and I remember she was never without a bag of nuts which she would graze on for the entire journey.  I do hope a memorial service will be planned for her as I know there are many of us who will want to pay our respects to Bryony who was a lovely dancer and a lovely person.

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Such sad news. I have a short video clip of her in a rehearsal studio with a young ballet fan who had cerebral palsy. Briony dances for her and helps her try on pointe shoes and a headdress - very touching. I'm wondering if any of her performances were recorded. I think she may be one of the fairy variation in a recording of Sleeping Beauty, but I wonder if there is a recording of her Swan Lake.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How dreadfully sad - so young.  I remember her being promoted as the first of a new type of dancer: tall, willowy but athletic and I'm sure she paved the way for dancers like Bussell and Guillem to be accepted in the romantic roles.

 

She didn't have the happiest time at the RB but I do hope they remember her and her importance.  She was a great dancer but not for long enough.

 

Linda

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So sad. I remember the newspaper article,can`t remember which paper it was. "Has Nureyev found the new Fonteyn ?".  It wrote about her quick rise in the Company,being picked out to dance with Nureyev and that her fans "Cheer her on like they are watching a revolution". I think at the time a lot of us thought she was going to be Fonteyn`s successor as the Company`s next Prima Ballerina. RIP.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So sorry to hear this. I'll be digging out some very old programmes to remind myself what I saw her in. I had a great fascination for her - you could always spot her on the stage and would be drawn to watching her performance over others. A beautiful interesting dancer!

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

She made patchy progress, however, which some observers blamed on an inattentive Royal Ballet management failing to nurture her through the tests of classical repertoire.

 

I saw this paragraph, and wondered what was behind it.  How did the RB management fail to nurture her?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was rather sad really. She was the 'star of the moment' and she was physically very different from many of her colleagues. One minute she was in everything and the next she was sort of dropped without trace. I feel that she was mentally quite fragile and when tougher dances came along Bryony faded from notice. Macmillan's didn't use her much at all and when people like Ferri

appeared Bryony's star faded and faded very quickly.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This news has upset me deeply which is why I haven't commented until now.  Something went badly wrong with this dancer's career and I wouldn't want to speculate here as to why that happened.  She was quite unique and at the time massively popular with the audience, personally I thought her superior to the others in the company at the time.  If, as has been suggested, she had a fragile personality, I would have thought it incumbent on the RB management of the time to offer more in the way of pastoral care.  Her early retirement from the company was an incalculable loss to the art of dance.  

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This news has upset me deeply which is why I haven't commented until now.  Something went badly wrong with this dancer's career and I wouldn't want to speculate here as to why that happened.  She was quite unique and at the time massively popular with the audience, personally I thought her superior to the others in the company at the time.  If, as has been suggested, she had a fragile personality, I would have thought it incumbent on the RB management of the time to offer more in the way of pastoral care.  Her early retirement from the company was an incalculable loss to the art of dance.  

 

Seconded, in all respects. Thank you MAB.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...