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ReadyforCoffee

American teen relocating to London

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Hi, everyone,

 

We might be relocating to London from the US next year for my husband's job and I am looking for recommendations for my my DD (15).  She currently attends a rigorous, competitive school in our town.  She is in their pre-professional program and trains 5-8 hours per day.  Many of the kids in this program do their schooling online as they dance during the day.

 

My DD attended the ENBS summer school this past summer and will audition for their year-round program but barring acceptance, she will need a new ballet home.  Her current school's style is mostly Vaganova with some Bournenville and a little Contemporary.  She is accustomed to training long hours.

 

I don't yet know what part of London we'll be in.  I am only just starting to research schools for my kids.  Moving half-way through high school is proving to be complicated as the school systems are quite different between the US and the UK.

 

Does anyone have any recommendations for a good ballet school?  Are daytime programs available in the UK?  Has anyone made this move and can offer some advice?  

 

Many thanks!

 

ReadyforCoffee

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You could look at the London Russian Ballet School we were impressed when we were looking for a school.

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Hi ReadyforCoffee

 

So I take it your dd will be 15 / 16 when you move her next year?

At that age in the UK students apply for Upper Schools if they want to train in classical ballet full time with view to getting into a professional company.

 

She would need to apply this coming academic year for Upper schools, schools open their applications from September usually, with all info on their websites. There would be application forms, photos, and potentially a video to submit, before an initial audition, after which some are invited to finals and some aren't. After the second (final) audition places are offered.

 

The main schools I know of are Royal Ballet School, ENB school, Elmhurst School, Central School in England. Also Ballet West which is Scotland I think (?)

Students start these courses when they are 16 after completing GCSE's and most courses offer A levels or equivalent for academic schooling.

 

Hope this helps. 

 

 

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Look at the location of ENB  Central and RBS think about the journey and discuss the safety of moving round London and your family lifestyle as sadly terrorism is real. 

 

All full time schools do similar hours each day and in UK money talks 

 

only ever heard great things about the Russian school Masters of Ballet but only know one child there 

 

theres some great private teachers aswell depending where you will be living 

 

our academic year in England is September to Mid July and birthdays dictate your school year ie after 1st September unless it’s Central who have taken 15 nearly 16 year olds before 

 

Explain to your daughter that it’s ok to change schools during these 3 years and many do although there can be costs involved in giving notice 

 

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Home-schooling is far less common here: all children must be in school until 16 (GCSE* exam age), and then they must be in education, work, or other post-compulsory education (eg apprenticeship) until 18. 

 

In central London there are a number of choices. The London Russian ballet school has been mentioned. You might also look at the West London School of Dance, run by Anna du Boisson. She also teaches every day at Danceworks, which runs an International Ballet programme - taught by excellent teachers (I do their open classes). I see the children on Saturday - they seem busy & very well taught. Michaela de Prince is a regular guest teacher to their summer school.

http://danceworks.net/teachers/anna-du-boisson/

http://www.danceworks-academy.net/

 

*General Certificate of Secondary Education - the standard national qualification for 16 year olds.

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And I'd have to disagree with the "terrorism is real" comment. Children in London are far more likely to be hurt by a motor car, than a terrorist attack. Children travel across London to go to school every day. The UK is an extremely safe country. And we have proper gun control.

Edited by Kate_N
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26 minutes ago, Canary said:

discuss the safety of moving round London and your family lifestyle as sadly terrorism is real. 

 

 

Good grief.  The only thing you need to do differently with regard to terrorism in London (or elsewhere in the UK) is be vigilant.  Just get on with daily life.

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46 minutes ago, Canary said:

Look at the location of ENB  Central and RBS think about the journey and discuss the safety of moving round London and your family lifestyle as sadly terrorism is real. 

 

Oh good grief is right. What is wrong with you? 

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Hi - we don’t really have day time programmes in the UK. Children wanting that kind of training generally apply from age 11 onwards  to full time vocational school where they combine academics & dance training. 

 

As you may have found from your research age 16 is a big point of change in the UK system. All children take nationally set exams called GCSE’s at the end of what would be your Sophomore Year they then have several choices of what to do next depending on their results. 

 

Dance wise this means that at the beginning of Sophomore Year you can apply to Upper School. Some schools offer dance training alongside academic study of A levels (2-3 academic subjects rather than a broad range). Some schools offer a 3 year diploma in dance which is equivalent to a degree but more vocational. 

 

As a US Citizen I think I’m correct in saying that you would not be eligible for state finance but individual schools may offer scholarships and/or bursaries. 

 

Some schools to consider & research include

 

Royal Ballet School

ENBS

Central School of Ballet

Tring Park

Royal Conservatoire of Scotland 

KS Dance, Warrington

Kings International Ballet Academy

(there are a few more too)

 

 

 

 

Edited by Picturesinthefirelight
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Re terrorism, the IRA was a serious   organised threat to this country for 30 years. It didn’t stop people going about their lives any more than these disorganised, lone nutcases will.

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So anyway

lots to work out but so many great options to explore. When I see the sunny pics from London lately it looks fabulous 

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2 minutes ago, DD Driver said:

So anyway

lots to work out but so many great options to explore. When I see the sunny pics from London lately it looks fabulous 

 

London is fabulous, even when it's raining!

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I’ve lived, studied, worked and bought up children in London and wouldn’t be anywhere else! It’s an exciting and vibrant place to be. Everywhere has issues in some form or other.

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Yes London is a vibrant exciting and inclusive city.

 

Depending on how old your daughter will be when you move here either she will be at the point of applying for upper schools as others have explained, or if not yet 16 would need to find some high quality training to do in preparation for applying to upper schools.

it is different in the uk as most students wanting to do this would go to a vocational ‘lower’ school from 11-16, rather than home schooling and 5-8 hours in a pre pro programme such as in the states.

 

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So pleased at the reaction of some, it’s very reassuring for those of us that have worked to make London safer to know that people think this way about our beautiful city. 

Due to public support around preventing all crime a ‘suspect packages’ and similar calls impact on public transport network regularly, not just shutting stations but the ripple that this has on the buses and roads, halls of residence have had to be evacuated before now as part of something ongoing in the area and a 16 year old travelling in a new city could find this unnerving if they haven’t given it some thought. Some mobiles work on certain underground’s and it’s getting better all the time but the need to google alternative routes and make full use of TFL apps, Uber app etc and walking routes is worth discussing. 

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32 minutes ago, Canary said:

Due to public support around preventing all crime a ‘suspect packages’ and similar calls impact on public transport network regularly, not just shutting stations but the ripple that this has on the buses and roads, halls of residence have had to be evacuated before now as part of something ongoing in the area and a 16 year old travelling in a new city could find this unnerving if they haven’t given it some thought. Some mobiles work on certain underground’s and it’s getting better all the time but the need to google alternative routes and make full use of TFL apps, Uber app etc and walking routes is worth discussing. 

 

Exactly the same as if a train breaks down or there's an RTA, or the joys of a tube strike.  Isn't this just common sense, or am I missing something?

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To be fair its worth mentioning only because there has been a lot of press about London terrorist attacks because the USA's (insert preferred adjective) POTUS likes to make scathing attacks on Sadiq Khan and the state of London as a hotbed of terrorism and danger. So someone relocating from USA could have a very skewed idea about what happens in London or how little attention most Londoners pay to this comparatively minor threat. So worth discussing simply to reassure...

 

Agree that most of what you need to know is just common sense advice on managing London transport and the general advice on safety for young women travelling around a big city alone (which is no different here than anywhere else).

 

And another vote for the London Russian Ballet School from DS.

 

 

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I know this isn't really relevant to the question, but reading the reactions to the reference to terrorism in England, I thought you'd enjoy this.  Moderators if you have to remove it, so be it........

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11 hours ago, Canary said:

Look at the location of ENB  Central and RBS think about the journey and discuss the safety of moving round London and your family lifestyle as sadly terrorism is real. 

 

<Snip>

 

 

I have to agree with Kate N, you are far safer in the UK  even in the most ghetto of areas  than you are in the US  ... 

the UK is extrmely adept at  coping with terrorism , the  current  favoured terrorist causes are   less active and  killing /maiming  far fewer than the provional IRA  did  at their peak ...   despite all the  Support,. succour and funding  routed via NORAID and the like ... 

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9 hours ago, Fiz said:

Re terrorism, the IRA was a serious   organised threat to this country for 30 years. It didn’t stop people going about their lives any more than these disorganised, lone nutcases will.


 fiz were you  in Lincs in the 1980s ?   when  8 pointing  under your car  was  standard practice  in some places  because even if you  were a civvies, your neighbours  and school friends were likely service families ...

Edited by Nicola H

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Lived in Central London for 22 years now and fortunately the night of London Bridge our daughter decided to stay in for dinner before joining her boyfriend in London Bridge. It was a good decision. My daughter's boyfriend was not so lucky - he saw terrible things, lost his work colleague that night and had a stranger die in his arms. He somehow found time to call my daughter to stop her from coming, for which I will be eternally grateful. I remember his call- my daughter was on the stairs with her jacket on ready to go. People have different perspectives and experiences and some poor people are just downright unlucky/in the wrong place at the wrong time, but I must admit I find some of the comments here about the risk (or lack of) in London a little bit too dismissive. 

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The only other point to consider is funding for vocational schools. Post 16.  Some offer a DaDa (Dance & Drama award) others offer in-house scholarships.  But check the fine print for the residency test for these funding schemes . 3yrs UK residency has been mentioned. Otherwise it would be the ‘Bank of mum & dad’. Starting at about £14,000pa for fees but rising quite rapidly then there’s accommodation if not living at home. London Vocational schools are quoting about £11,000pa for maintenance. Looking at probably around £28/30,000 for each of the 3yrs of pre-professional training. 

Good Luck. 

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1 hour ago, Nicola H said:


 fiz were you  in Lincs in the 1980s ?   when  8 pointing  under your car  was  standard practice  in some places  because even if you  were a civvies, your neighbours  and school friends were likely service families ...

No, Nicola. I was in Hertfordshire but family and friends plus teachers had commuter husbands and there were some near misses including the father of a dear school friend who decided that the violence in Northern Ireland was greatly exaggerated and went for a job interview there. A bomb exploded at the railway station when he was there. He was all right but three weeks later, his wife was still finding pieces of crazed glass in the clothing he had worn that day. He declined the job, incidentally.

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1 hour ago, Nicola H said:


 fiz were you  in Lincs in the 1980s ?   when  8 pointing  under your car  was  standard practice  in some places  because even if you  were a civvies, your neighbours  and school friends were likely service families ...

Definitely didn't happen in the part of Lincolnshire I lived in during the 1980s but it's true I wasn't that close to Cranwell, Waddington etc.

Anyway, going back to the original post, I hope if the OP comes to the UK there will be a wealth of dance opportunities for her dd. Does the Academy of Balletic Arts train dancers of this age? Another to add to the list maybe?

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Hi folks....can we please continue to provide useful ideas to the OP and dispense with the talk of terrorism.  

 

Many thanks.  

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