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My viewing of "Swan Lake" at the local Picturehouse was somewhat marred by the smelly feet of a woman sitting near me, who kept taking her shoes off every few minutes.

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11 hours ago, Alice Shortcake said:

My viewing of "Swan Lake" at the local Picturehouse was somewhat marred by the smelly feet of a woman sitting near me, who kept taking her shoes off every few minutes.

 

people are weird!

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The Turn of the Screw last night at Regent's Park open-air theatre... twilight... excellent lighting design to provide maximum atmospheric creepiness in conjunction with the fading light (the performance ended around 10:15pm)... and during the penultimate scene, my immediate neighbours with brightly-lit phones in their hands, ordering their Uber home. :angry:

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Hope it didn't spoil the evening too much, I went last week and found the outdoor setting with the rustling leaves really enhanced the spookiness.

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While having a lovely time last week at Sunshine on Leith at the Kings in Glasgow, I had the very strange situation of having someone who could only be described as a corpse sitting next to me.  For anyone who's ever seen this fantastically funny play (or indeed the film) it's full of humour, emotion and amazing sing-a-long opportunities - all to songs from the fabulous Proclaimers back catalogue. 

 

The gentleman sitting next to me didn't smile, snigger, laugh, sing or even applaud any of the scenes.  It was truly bizarre.  At first I felt quite awkward and thought I was maybe disturbing his intense enjoyment of the show - but after about 15 minutes when I'd come to the conclusion that he was just plain weird, I joined in with the rest of the crowd and laughed out loud and cheered and gave rapturous applause whenever the action called for it.

 

Why do people go along to a show of this nature if they clearly don't enjoy this genre.  Yes it may have been the case that he had been dragged along as a Plus 1 - but curiouser and curiouser when the show finished he left on his own, without a backward glance at anyone! 

 

Anyway it didn't spoil my enjoyment so if you ever get a chance to see this hilarious show I can thoroughly recommend it - although for those of you south of the border it may be wise to go along to a captioned show as some of the accents and vernacular are particular to the Central Belt :D!!

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4 minutes ago, ballettaxi said:

Why do people go along to a show of this nature if they clearly don't enjoy this genre.  Yes it may have been the case that he had been dragged along as a Plus 1 - but curiouser and curiouser when the show finished he left on his own, without a backward glance at anyone! 

 

Probably a critic ;)

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Well I thought that too, but the shows been running for a few weeks already, so had dismissed that - but you're probably right. Anyway I know what he looks like and if I turn up to another show and he's there I'll be swapping seats with whoever I'm with.  ;)

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5 hours ago, ballettaxi said:

Why do people go along to a show of this nature if they clearly don't enjoy this genre.

 

5 hours ago, Lizbie1 said:

Probably a critic ;)

 

If you can bear to click on a Daily Mail link, I refer you to Quentin Letts’s review of The Turn of the Screw. Why send somebody who clearly just doesn’t like 20th-century opera, and sneers at the notion that others might, to benefit from press tickets to just such a show?

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Just now, RuthE said:

 

If you can bear to click on a Daily Mail link, I refer you to Quentin Letts’s review of The Turn of the Screw. Why send somebody who clearly just doesn’t like 20th-century opera, and sneers at the notion that others might, to benefit from press tickets to just such a show?

 

I try very hard to be open minded about the Daily Mail, but that review really was extraordinary. (The bit about the name Miles was plain weird.)

 

The most generous interpretation I can come up with is that QL had eaten something that disagreed with him.

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Not Ballet I know ......but have just read on the BBC website that last Tuesday at the Nottingham theatre which is showing the musical "Titanic" at the moment a couple of women sitting right in the front row were on their phones watching the penalty shoot out at the World Cup and cheering loudly every time England got a goal!! Apparently when a member of the cast asked them to put their phones away they gave them the thumbs up to say yes we won!! This was at the most sensitive bit in the musical too!! 

Now were these young teenagers? Not a bit one was middle aged and the other lady older!!

Honestly.......have no idea why some people go to the theatre .....but many seem to think that ALL  public spaces are an extension of their living rooms unfortunately!! 

Its great to be enthusiastic about the World Cup but if they felt that excited about it all that they couldn't wait till later they could have have discreetly left the auditorium and watched it outside! 

Personally I can't bear to watch penalty shoot outs for important matches anyway .....too nerve wracking!! 

I was travelling back to Brighton that evening and originally thought we must have lost the match as couldn't hear any sort of celebratory outbursts anywhere!! But hadn't realised it had gone on to extra time etc etc but just as hit Brighton station there was no doubt then everyone was cheering and cars tooting and so on!! 

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Just to counter some of the bad side of things, last night a lady in the front row at 42nd Street got her phone out to photograph or video the post-bows dance and the usher was straight down to sort it (I was on the aisle and there was a lovely breeze as the usher rushed by!).

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Whilst with the RB in Madrid there was a lot of phone filming in the audience with no action taken at all. Apparently - and I have this 2nd hand, but it can be checked, someone video'd Yasmine's Act 3 fouettes at the 10pm performance and posted them online before Act 4 had even started, notifying her of this event too! 

Edited by JennyTaylor
typo

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I was distracted by the light of a phone constantly being looked at right across the other side of the auditorium. Whatever they are doing with it - filming, tweeting - they can’t know how completely obvious and distracting it is 😡

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12 hours ago, JennyTaylor said:

Whilst with the RB in Madrid there was a lot of phone filming in the audience with no action taken at all. Apparently - and I have this 2nd hand, but it can be checked, someone video'd Yasmine's Act 3 fouettes at the 10pm performance and posted them online before Act 4 had even started, notifying her of this event too! 

 

I was mostly above stalls level in Madrid and there were phones visible everywhere. I even had someone behind me whose torch was on while he was filming. I think that there are a lot of 'black swan' clips around.

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At the ROH last week for Falstaff I was impressed by the speed at which one of the ushers told someone in S/C row A to turn her phone off. To be fair, the woman was just in the process of turning it off, although the opera,had started. But good to see.

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Thanks to Katherine Barber for posting this on FB!

 

From about 3'15" look at what happens to the sweetie paper rustler!  This sort of cartoon could be useful for helping people understand audience etiquette so still relevant today.

 

 

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What a great video, had a good laugh and I think it would be good idea for teaching some people a different behaviour during performances. Though maybe it is too funny and they would think it is only satirical...Also the people find more and more things to annoy and disturb the audience around them. When I was at "The magic flute" in Salzburg this summer a woman in front of me tied her hair at least four times to a messy bun. And naturally she had to toss her hair with big gestures every time...

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On 01/09/2018 at 10:25, Esmeralda said:

What a great video, had a good laugh and I think it would be good idea for teaching some people a different behaviour during performances. Though maybe it is too funny and they would think it is only satirical...Also the people find more and more things to annoy and disturb the audience around them. When I was at "The magic flute" in Salzburg this summer a woman in front of me tied her hair at least four times to a messy bun. And naturally she had to toss her hair with big gestures every time...

What a pity you didn't have a tube of Superglue in your bag...!

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Probably the greatest-ever response to a noisy audience member: Jon Vickers, as Tristan, is as mad as hell and he isn't going to take the coughing any more!

 

 

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Here is an extract from the diary of the veteran of the London stage, the actor William Charles Macready, describing the audience at his performance of Macbeth at the Astor Place Opera House, New York, in 1849, an event which resulted in one of the worst riots in theatre history:

 

"I went on; they would not let me speak. The roar of insults that greeted my entrance was so deafening, that the play continued in dumb show. Copper cents were thrown, some struck me, four or five eggs, a great many apples, lemons, pieces of wood, nearly, if not quite, a whole peck of potatoes. A chair was thrown on to the stage, another into the orchestra pit, which made the remaining musicians move out...I flung my whole soul into every word I uttered while all around dreadful deeds of outrage were roaring within our ears. The death of Macbeth was loudly cheered. Suddenly soldiers were brought in and began firing indiscriminately. Several people, at least twenty-two perished. And so it was with immediate haste, that I quit the New York stage".

 

 

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On 27/06/2018 at 22:01, RuthE said:

 

 

If you can bear to click on a Daily Mail link, I refer you to Quentin Letts’s review of The Turn of the Screw. Why send somebody who clearly just doesn’t like 20th-century opera, and sneers at the notion that others might, to benefit from press tickets to just such a show?

 

I always thought, in my case for music albums, that there should be two reviews; One from someone who knows about the genre and already appreciates it, understands its nuances, etc., and one from someone who isn't normally on board with it, but can offer an outsider's perspective. Too often I've read reviews from someone who clearly doesn't enjoy or appreciate that kind of music, makes that fact clear, and I learn nothing about whether the album is any good!

 

I always remember a friend of mine saying "The problem with reviewers is that a lot of the time they're mostly reviewing themselves", by showing off how much they know, how snarky they can be and just how gosh-darn intelligent and insightful they are, and I think that's probably true.

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Article today on BBC about audience behaviour which raises the possibility of relaxed performances. I think ENB do specific child friendly ‘my first ballet’ style performances, but don’t recall ROH offering ‘relaxed’ performances for those who may not be able to sit still or quietly for the duration. But an interesting thought!

 

 https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-45498464

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Smart watches in the theatre are my latest bugbear - the screen lights up with a message when notifications, emails etc come in .  It already seems to take people about three minutes to switch off their mobile phones when requested to do so, and when it comes to smart watches they appear to have simply thrown away the manual...

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24 minutes ago, Quintus said:

Smart watches in the theatre are my latest bugbear - the screen lights up with a message when notifications, emails etc come in .  It already seems to take people about three minutes to switch off their mobile phones when requested to do so, and when it comes to smart watches they appear to have simply thrown away the manual...

 

The Apple Watch (which is most popular) has a specific, special mode for theatres and things that prevents the watch lighting up until you tap it and puts it on do-not-disturb. I think the latest software update will even suggest it to people if it works out that you're at an event like that. You can't help some people though.

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On 17/09/2018 at 07:24, Riva said:

Article today on BBC about audience behaviour which raises the possibility of relaxed performances. I think ENB do specific child friendly ‘my first ballet’ style performances, but don’t recall ROH offering ‘relaxed’ performances for those who may not be able to sit still or quietly for the duration. But an interesting thought!

 

 https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-45498464

How typically BBC.  The majority who don't have Crohn's disease must be disadvantaged and inconvenienced for the minority (very) who do.  The whole piece has Jeremy Vine written all over it.

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3 minutes ago, penelopesimpson said:

How typically BBC.  The majority who don't have Crohn's disease must be disadvantaged and inconvenienced for the minority (very) who do.  The whole piece has Jeremy Vine written all over it.

 

How very inclusive and accepting of you.  The point here is that if someone sits on the end of the row and needs to leave to visit the bathroom, that others don't judge them for having to do so.  

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Yes.  After all, a number of West End theatres - at least - have toilets which can be accessed from inside the auditorium.  I'm sure the theatre would be happy to advise, in the same way that they do for disabled people.  Assuming you can get hold of someone to speak to, that is.  Better that than to sit mid-row and disturb everyone when you have to get out mid-performance, surely?  I'd be rather more concerned about people being (unavoidably) noisy than someone nipping discreetly out to the loo.

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34 minutes ago, bangorballetboy said:

 

How very inclusive and accepting of you.  The point here is that if someone sits on the end of the row and needs to leave to visit the bathroom, that others don't judge them for having to do so.  

Ah, 'inclusive'.  Another wonderful BBC word that effectively includes the minority but tells the majority to suck it up.

 

For the record, I have no problem with somebody getting up to use the lavatory.  I take it for granted that they would not inconvenience people unless their need was great.  I was less charmed by the woman next to me who threw up all over the seat in front at Winter's Tale, but I suppose that's probably because I hadn't read my inclusivity missive that morning.  Fortunately, I have no need to virtue signal, preferring to rely on simple good manners.

Edited by penelopesimpson

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