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Questions about Upper School auditions


Anna C

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  • 4 weeks later...
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For Rambert, for this year it said "the solo you bring should be approximately one minute long and in any style.  You can choreograph it yourself or have someone else do that.  Solos will be undertaken in practice clothes rather than costume."

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  • 2 weeks later...

Please could someone who has firsthand experience tell me what actually happens at a ballet upper school audition?

I'm applying to schools in October for September 2015 but I've never been to a dance audition before :unsure: and I'd like to be prepared. Is there anything other than the obvious that I need to bring? Do they have a warm up before hand or do you need to get there really early to it yourself? If you don't manage to get a spot in the front row will you still be seen etc?

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Your ballet audition usually takes the form of a normal ballet class starting at the barre. Schools websites and the letters with your audition time will tell you what you must wear, what you need to bring and how early you may get there. I think you usually get a number and where you stand then follows from that with each row taking turns at the front - so yes you will be seen. Read through the threads on here and look at websites of those you are interested you in. Good luck.

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My DD also found the ENBS audition workshop very informative and useful. Dance/ballet magazines often have articles about auditions some of which may be accessible on the web. You may like to ask your teacher and other dancers for useful tips too.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi, I'm new to this forum but I wonder if anybody could give me some advice/opinions on auditioning for ballet colleges/sixth forms? I go to a normal local school that doesn't teach any ballet at all. I'm worried that this would completely ruin my chances as I would obviously be going up against people who have had full time vocational training! Does anyone know the chances of getting into an upper school with just 9 hours of ballet a week. I take part in things like EYB and MTB, but do I maybe need to start more classes? I'm in year 9 so I do have time, but it means so much to me and I want to do everything I can to improve and to boost my chances of being accepted at a ballet college. Any advice would be appreciated! X

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Hi Chloe

My DD goes to a 'normal school' too , and in year 9 was only doing 5 hours of ballet per week (including CAT scheme) She has never done a summer school, but applied to RBS Senior Associate scheme for year 11 entry and was accepted. She also successfully  auditioned for Dance East Cat for entry into year 9.  DD did start with another ballet teacher 2 1/2 years ago to pursue her vocational exams ( she has been so lucky with her ballet teacher, the best ever). DD is going to Central School of Ballet in September ( also had a funded offer from Tring and BTUK school), so her audition year has been very successful.

I would advise you to join an associate scheme, or CAT scheme - not all finish at 16. I couldn't afford summer schools, but DD got there anyway. Just remember, schools are also looking for potential - have a go and I wish you the very best of luck xxx

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Thank you Tulip - it's so exciting. it's been hard keeping her focused on GCSE's as she has her mind on other things :)

She seems so young to be living in London, but they all seem to thrive on it don't they. So very pleased that she's going there  :)

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My daughter is a summer birth, still not 18 yet and she has been fine in London. They are not out much in London at night, because they are all shattered, and they can't get into places due to their age. It has been an amazing experience for my daughter to live independently in our capital, getting her food shopping in, going to theatres oh and shopping in Oxford street. She has learned how to budget and self sufficient. All very important skills for when she gains employment and moves wherever in the world.

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chloeballet13- my dd also non-vocational though now Year 10.  I would echo the advice of jazzpaws- if you are able to attend a CAT or associate scheme of some kind it would be an advantage in terms of your own training and development plus it helps from point of view of audition experience/experience with new teachers/different approaches etc and helps you to benchmark your self with other dancers who will also be auditioning at 16.  If not feasible and either way, do discuss your aspirations with your local teacher to make sure she/he can support you in planning to be at the right kind of level (which is generally intermediate/adv 1 equivalent ) by the time you audition.

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  • 2 months later...

I seem to have incurred the wrath of my dd's local teacher over classes/associates and I'm concerned it may start to scupper the teachers support for upper school applications this year.

 

Do any of the Upper Schools in the UK require a written reference of any kind from your current dance school/s? And if so, does anyone know if this has much bearing on applications?? 

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I sent an unsigned form to RBS once because my DD's old teacher didn't "believe" in his students auditioning elsewhere so I didn't want to ask him. I explained why to RBS and they said it was not a problem... Hope it helps!

Edited by afab
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Thank you for responses, I am very grateful.  Sounds like dance reference will be required in some cases , and whilst we don't know how much account is taken of them its probably best that I do not burn our bridges with the dance school so I need to think up a reconciliatory approach to get things back on track.

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Scotland's practical reference asks for the following:

  • Performing or composition ability, experience and potential.
  • General academic ability in music, drama, dance, screen or production.
  • Practical skills.
  • Attitude to work and reliability.
  • Professional commitment.

Communicative ability

 

It asks for 2 separate references so if a dance teacher did one then the other needs to be someone who can comment on academic ability.

Hope that helps :)

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Lottie- thanks yes, thats a good idea and I will do this if it comes to it (and frankly may be best option anyway as perhaps more prestigious) but I probably need to at least attempt rescue relations locally anyway to smooth passage through exams as its the only local school that does the right level.

 

Jaylou62- thank you that is extremely helpful thank you for going to the trouble of digging this out.

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