Jump to content

Negative ballet perceptions


balletla
 Share

Recommended Posts

So annoyed to see this article and the un-informed comment about most people who do ballet being upper class. What absolute nonsense! It is this sort of stereotyping from a position of ignorance that means ballet continues to be seen as elitist and does not attract the funding that other arts do. Someone should tell her that there are plenty of boys from Yorkshire in ballet schools and companies in this country!

 

http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/lifestyle/arts-entertainment/leeds-dancing-star-picked-for-national-ballet-school-1-5647625

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 67
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

What a ridiculous and untrue statement - ballet is not the preserve of the upper class! I hope that this doesn't adversely affect other talented children who need to seek assistance with funding....

 

Given that Yorkshire is a positive hotbed of balletic education, I think she can rest easy that a Yorkshire accent (or of course any other regional accent) makes not one jot of difference!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wouldn't it be refreshing to see just one newspaper article about a young male dancer that doesn't mention Billy Elliot? It must drive the boys crazy, being continually described as "Such and such a place's answer to Billy Elliot".

  • Like 12
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, newspapers have a habit of putting things in quotation marks, when that isn't what has actually been said to the reporter at all.

 

Journalists ask all sorts of leading questions and the answers will often (almost always?) be paraphrased out of all recognition! :wacko:

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wouldn't it be refreshing to see just one newspaper article about a young male dancer that doesn't mention Billy Elliot? It must drive the boys crazy, being continually described as "Such and such a place's answer to Billy Elliot".

 and also refreshing would be refraining from describing female dancers as "the next Darcey Bussell"!

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think sometimes people say things without thinking.  I am aware that when I moved to London in the 80's speaking in a northern Durham accent most people that I met within the first 6 months assumed when they heard me speak that I was Geordie (from Newcastle) and owned whippets/greyhounds and flat caps mainly associated with dog racing. Some peoples perceptions maybe if they dont have the opportunities to travel and mingle with the rest of the country can somewhat be misconstrued as to stereotype.  Some people who hear a southern accent may assume its either upper class or cockney as this is sometimes extremely portrayed as so in the media. My partner who moved from London to the North was called the posh Cockney!!  It seems so many people have their own impressions of what accents are associated with!!

Ax

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do have to say in this poor woman's defence, I am from Yorkshire, I don't live there anymore but when I do speak I always feel I'm less worthy. As soon as you open your mouth people stare. I have a child at vocational school and I'm so proud of my Yorkshire heritage and and I encourage my dd to be the same. But when you hear the very upper classes talking about the ballet world it's very difficult to see where you will fit in, apart from being the token council house kid ????

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

But all those alleged upper class people are coming to watch your talented child. Any way what makes them upper class. Is it herritage, education, money? I thought that the class system was starting to become diluted, snobbery is another story.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe the upper class remark was her interpretation of a southern accent! When I started teaching in Liverpool the kids from the old bullring there that I taught said oo you talk posh miss! And used to imitate me. One day I came into class and practiced my best Liverpool accent on them....they fell about laughing but loved it and soon forgot I was "posh" . Is this one of those North/south divide things? I agree about the Billy Elliot thing....getting annoying. Before Darcey it was who will be the next Fonteyn!! None of the people I know who either do or did ballet are "upper class" at any rate.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with the North/South perceptions.....

We live on the south coast and DD goes to Hammond.  When she first started there everyone said she was posh because of her accent....

despite a LOT of them living far better lifestyles and in bigger houses than we did :D

Now she has adopted their accents to 'fit in' better but when we visit we are still considered 'posh' to her firends Lol

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love all accents and I never judge any one by them. I have always taught my children to use good English and not slang, this has helped them immensely during interviews etc. At vocational school there are usually so many accents, but over the next two years of being away, they all seem to sound the same as each other. I didn't notice my daughters accent change from northern to southern, it was other people, but not the family funnily enough. My daughters best friend is from Yorkshire and she does have a strong accent. I just love hearing her friend talk. This girl is extremely bright, articulate and very proud of her accent, but weirdly her mother who is from Yorkshire has lost her accent. I must admit I hate my accent simply because people will stereotype where you are from. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lin, I grew up in a council house too. However my mother, who came from Newcastle, was taught RP and never had an accent. I was taught grammar by a red hot keen grammar teacher at junior school and I was accused of being a snob - i.e different - by the kids I went to school with. I ended up at grammar school and then university. Then I met someone from a very different background and it did matter how I spoke. Thank you, Mum and Mr Thorpe!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...