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Bolshoi Ballet : Ratmansky new Giselle


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I couldn't get this to  work very well ....kept loading and re loading ....but eventually saw the video but then no sound!! Anyway the costumes looked pretty traditional and the bits of choreography I saw also. 

I'm always interested in any new Ratmansky so will be interested to see how it's generally received at the Bolshoi.

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Can anyone remember when Michaela de Prince guested as Myrthe in Giselle in London ....was it with ENB ...I don't think it was ...but can't think which Company it was. 

Anhway I seem to remember that in that performance a fugue was used in the second Act that isn't usually seen .....but was used originally in the ballet....I don't know whether this is the same fugue that Ratmansky is using. 

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19 minutes ago, LinMM said:

Can anyone remember when Michaela de Prince guested as Myrthe in Giselle in London ....was it with ENB ...I don't think it was ...but can't think which Company it was. 

Anhway I seem to remember that in that performance a fugue was used in the second Act that isn't usually seen .....but was used originally in the ballet....I don't know whether this is the same fugue that Ratmansky is using. 

Yes, it was the ENB in the Mary Skeaping production, which in my opinion is one of the best Giselle productions out there and Skeaping was herself, a musicologist who studied the original Adam score in the Paris Opera House's archives and added the Fugue back in because she said, it showed the conflict between good and evil.

 

It does sound like Ratmansky is using the same fugue - be interesting to see how he choreographs it. I also hope that the mime is kept intact as Berthe's mime, in which she tells the legend of the Wilis is very atmospheric.

Edited by CHazell2
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23 hours ago, LinMM said:

I got the impression from the article....perhaps wrongly .... that  it was going to be screened in Canada and USA 

 

Yes USA and Canada as well as the rest of the world.  It is part of the Bolshoi in cinema live screenings series, just as Raymonda recently.

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Just read the very good review on DanceTabs, it sounds wonderful, the peasant pdd back as a pdd, the fugue movement is in the second act, and, something I have always wanted to see, the original ending where the royal party come looking for Albrecht and Giselle gestures him to return to life, hopefully the last piece of music has been restored to fit it.

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2 hours ago, Beryl H said:

it sounds wonderful, the peasant pdd back as a pdd,

 

 

That's something I'm personally not too keen on :)  It's such a major pdd that I think (at least in the versions I've seen over the years) it detracts from Giselle and Albrecht too much - in the same way that we were just discussing that Birbanto, Lankendem et al can overwhelm Conrad on occasion in Le Corsaire.

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As well as the news footage, someone has posted some secretly filmed footage from the balcony on Belyakov's Facebook page which someone alerted me to.  Sadly, in the bits I have seen, the mother's mime is not only badly done but is quite bizarre and is nothing like the one Karsavina learned from Petipa which she passed on to Mary Skeaping (and is now done in the Royal Ballet production, as it was in Ashton's and Karsavina's staging in the 1960s).   I shall wait to see the whole thing before commenting on the choreography but it will be interesting to see if Ratmansky has got rid of all the lifts in the Act II pas de deux which were added by the Bolshoi in the production they brought to England in 1956.  Many thanks for all the kind comments about the Skeaping production, of which I am the guardian for the Skeaping family.  With regard to the peasant pas de deux, Skeaping keeps this in her production (but with each having one solo rather than the two in the original Perrot/Coralli version) but, because it was an interpolation, she places it much earlier so that, as Alison remarks, it does not detract from Giselle and Albrecht (its position in the original was a purely 'political' move) who then have the whole of the Pas de Vendanges pas de deux before the denouement.  This was cut drastically at some point in Russia so will not feature in the Stepanov notation.  I did see that some of the music is retained in Ratmansky's production but since the person filming was only interested in Belyakov I have no idea at the moment how much of it comes before the bit of solo I saw.  Bathilde and her father arrived on "white steeds" in the original 1841 ballet because there was room on the old Paris Opera stage for it, as there is on the Bolshoi stage.  It will be interesting to see the original ending to the ballet.  Skeaping uses the original music in the original orchestration but the one thing she thought would be difficult for today's audiences to accept was the original staging in which Giselle blesses the union of Albrecht and Bathilde as she disappears back into the earth! It will be interesting to see how this works out in this production!

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I think it would be very difficult to add to the pathos of today's ending with the original one somehow but would have to see how exactly staged etc but the ending as it is now seems perfect to me as Giselle disappears forever and Albrecht is left alone on stage to contemplate what has happened! 

Ive had several videos and piccies dropping into my Facebook page today of this new Giselle and the costumes look lovely. 

 

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1 hour ago, Irmgard said:

 Sadly, in the bits I have seen, the mother's mime is not only badly done but is quite bizarre and is nothing like the one Karsavina learned from Petipa which she passed on to Mary Skeaping (and is now done in the Royal Ballet production, as it was in Ashton's and Karsavina's staging in the 1960s).   I shall wait to see the whole thing before commenting on the choreography 

Hi Irmgard

 

When you say that Berthe's mime is bizarre - what precisely do you mean? 

 

Did the mime not come across particularly well or did they use different gestures?

 

 

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1 hour ago, LinMM said:

I think it would be very difficult to add to the pathos of today's ending with the original one somehow but would have to see how exactly staged etc but the ending as it is now seems perfect to me as Giselle disappears forever and Albrecht is left alone on stage to contemplate what has happened! 

 

She doesn't disappear in the BRB production, and I absolutely love that ending. This one promises to be even more radical (literally). For me, the concept is powerful (Giselle's forgiveness and love so complete that she wishes only for Albrecht's future happiness). But as you say it depends how it's staged - will be very interesting to see if/how it works.

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34 minutes ago, CHazell2 said:

Hi Irmgard

 

When you say that Berthe's mime is bizarre - what precisely do you mean? 

 

Did the mime not come across particularly well or did they use different gestures?

 

 

It all looked a bit manic, there were some very strange gestures and it certainly did not clearly tell the legend of the Wilis as taught by Karsavina to Mary Skeaping, plus the music for it was drastically cut.

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13 minutes ago, Irmgard said:

It all looked a bit manic, there were some very strange gestures and it certainly did not clearly tell the legend of the Wilis as taught by Karsavina to Mary Skeaping, plus the music for it was drastically cut.

Gosh, wonder why - Usually Alexei Ratmansky is good at that sort of thing. Maybe it was the choice of the dancer in that particular performance?

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