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teaching ballet


anondancer_15
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You can do an exercise to music qualification which covers you for aerobics and dance in general.

It is a level 2 course. You can get indemnity insurance through the guild of professional teachers of dance. You can even go on and do level 3 so you can teach in hospitals/nursing homes, exercise after pregnancy etc. These courses are offered in fe colleges.

You would need to make it clear to customers it is non-syllabus class.

If you wanted to enter children/adults for exams eventually then you would have to pursue a ballet teaching qualification.

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so I was looking into teaching ballet but dont think I want to do a syllabus, id rather teach an open class? does anyone know what qualifications you'd need for that?

If you look at the ballet teachers at places like Danceworks, where the classes are non-syllabus, they are almost always ex-professional company dancers. Is there a reason why you wouldn't want to teach syllabus? I suspect that unless you want to teach adults, most parents of young children either look for classes via recommendation or search for an RAD/ISTD/BBO etc registered teacher.

 

Unless you are well known in the dance world and/or are an ex-pro or registered teacher, you must surely be more employable with a recognised qualification.

 

The other thing to consider is which standard you're at for Ballet - have you passed RAD Intermediate or equivalent?

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thanks all! I've done up to grade 8 rad and advanced foundation. I do already have an exercise to music qualification also, and a DBS since I work with children. I've also taught at my old studio on a fairly regular basis, and done a dance leadership qualification.

 

in terms of syllabus, I just wanted to see what the options were without needing to a particular exam board if that makes sense, I realise I'd probably get a lot further if I did train in one of the boards. this way, can anyone recommend which one? I only have experience of RAD and I'm not a fan of the new grades so puts me off.

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Does it have to be ballet? My older daughter (not a dancer!), dropped out of dance classes when she reached about grade 3 or 4 because she simply couldn’t do it. She still liked dancing though. I thought at the time that a non-syllabus class for teenagers would have suited her perfectly - mixed styles, bit of jazz, tap, commercial ……..

Edited by BlueLou
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I agree that you are more likely to be successful teaching ballet if you train through one of the recognised bodies and teach a syllabus. The simple fact of the matter is that in the UK that is what most people are looking for, for children at least. Of course we could discuss at length whether this is right, but it is the way things are, and I can't see it changing any time soon. So if you want to earn a living as a teacher, it's probably what you need to do.

Have a look at the ISTD training. The advantage there is that they cover a wide range of genres, and whilst you do need to qualify separately in each one that you want to teach there are some modules, eg health and safety that are common to all. So once you've done one genre it's a bit quicker to do others. The RAD of course only offer ballet, so if you wanted to do other genres you'd have to train with another body. Some of the others, like ISTD and IDTA cover a much wider range of dance styles.

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I suppose it depends exactly what it is you dislike about the RAD grades syllabus.

 

If you train in one of the Russian syllabus there is a little more scope to be creative in that although there are still levels ....and certain things have to be covered and taught within these levels ....you can actually put the classes together any way you like .....not quite as prescribed as RAD or BBO for example.

 

In theory you can teach children up to about grade 5 or so but would not be able to put them in for exams unless properly qualified etc

In reality most parents looking for teachers would want their children to be able to take exams so would prefer a fully qualified teacher.

 

Perhaps if you want to work more in the Leisure Industry and therefore with older children or adults who don't want to take exams but who just enjoy dancing I think you could introduce some ballet in the way that you want as long as you have some qualification which allows you to teach movement/ dance/ exercise etc.

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From an adult student's perspective:

 

You don't need to be teaching a syllabus, but unless you have a really solid track record of professional dancing work, then as a teacher, the attraction you might offer could be indeed that you have trained to the highest level in a specific syllabus. Then you have a qualification that assures your pupils (clients? customers?) that you have training in a sound system of introducing ballet technique in a logical and progressive manner. Because, really, that's what any ballet syllabus aims to do. The RAD, BBO, ISTD syllabi are not a magic formulae - they're the result of a load of experts sitting down and working out (over many years) the order and rate in which to teach the technique and develop the artistry. (I wish there were a similar 3 year progressive syllabus for adult beginners, but that's another story).

 

As an adult student, I find the best teachers are those who've been professional dancers themselves, and have then retrained as teachers. They have the insider's knowledge of the art form which I've never found in teachers who simply train up through a particular syllabus. I've done that myself, but I'd never call myself qualified enough to teach!

 

But in the absence of that, a solid qualification (not just having done RAD Intermediate) in a reputable syllabus would be an indication of the knowledge you've gained.

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From an adult student's perspective:

 

You don't need to be teaching a syllabus, but unless you have a really solid track record of professional dancing work, then as a teacher, the attraction you might offer could be indeed that you have trained to the highest level in a specific syllabus. Then you have a qualification that assures your pupils (clients? customers?) that you have training in a sound system of introducing ballet technique in a logical and progressive manner. Because, really, that's what any ballet syllabus aims to do. The RAD, BBO, ISTD syllabi are not a magic formulae - they're the result of a load of experts sitting down and working out (over many years) the order and rate in which to teach the technique and develop the artistry. (I wish there were a similar 3 year progressive syllabus for adult beginners, but that's another story).

 

As an adult student, I find the best teachers are those who've been professional dancers themselves, and have then retrained as teachers. They have the insider's knowledge of the art form which I've never found in teachers who simply train up through a particular syllabus. I've done that myself, but I'd never call myself qualified enough to teach!

 

But in the absence of that, a solid qualification (not just having done RAD Intermediate) in a reputable syllabus would be an indication of the knowledge you've gained.

That makes a lot of sense ,   from my  experience   as a student and as a teacher  in other things  credibility of  the teacher is  important 

 

When i did a bit of teaching in sailing as a older teen  , the fact i was  in the third tier  down  from the  top  in the youth racing side of things  was always a plus  the top teirs sat 'above'  the syllabus  in that  to access that level of training  you'd have to demonstrate  knowledge and skills  equal to the top  certificated  levels  in both the 'racing' ( blue racing badge for those  who know  the 90s RYA syllabuses)  and 'technical'  ( level  5  ideally with  recommended for  Instructor  endorsement) syllabuses  ... 

 

( the top 2 tiers in the youth side of things  were  tiny - the top teir is literally a dozen  people in the whole country - it's the team that goes to the Youth world champs) in terms of credibility ... )

 

When teaching and assessing first aid, care and emergency care  subjects for a large charity  ( teaching was mainkly for other service delivery vols) the fact i was  working in a health professional role in my 'day job'  and my main volunteering role  was a combination of  crewing ambulances / bronze/ silver  roles as a manager  on events  and some policy stuff   made the issue of credibility issues pretty much a none event.  which reflects Kate's observation that a  good teacher who has  been a professional practitioner  is ' better'  subjectively and often objectively than some  someone who has achieved their   teaching qualification with the minimums of  'real world'  experience of doing it as a 'job'  ( regardless of paid status) 

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<snip>

 

Perhaps if you want to work more in the Leisure Industry and therefore with older children or adults who don't want to take exams but who just enjoy dancing I think you could introduce some ballet in the way that you want as long as you have some qualification which allows you to teach movement/ dance/ exercise etc.

 

However   does this attitude  promote the potential ofthe 'zumba-isation' of adult ballet  or  a risk of a polar split between 'casual'  and ' being  like  the youth syallbuses'  ?

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However   does this attitude  promote the potential ofthe 'zumba-isation' of adult ballet  or  a risk of a polar split between 'casual'  and ' being  like  the youth syallbuses'  ?

Doesn't matter. As long as people are having fun and enjoying their hobby, then bringing a little bit of ballet in to their dance classes can only be a good thing. Ballet has been seen as 'elitist' and the preserve of a certain social class (and a particular physique) for far too long. Time to bring it into the mainstream. :)

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If you wanted to teach another syllabus you'd have to learn their style and pass their own intermediate wouldn't you? If you were interested in another syllabus you could probably ask to watch some classes or buy some of the exam DVDs?

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Doesn't matter. As long as people are having fun and enjoying their hobby, then bringing a little bit of ballet in to their dance classes can only be a good thing. Ballet has been seen as 'elitist' and the preserve of a certain social class (and a particular physique) for far too long. Time to bring it into the mainstream. :)

access  may be an issue  , if adult ballet is zumbaised  - what about the adult beginner who  wants to study 'properly'  - are their options now severely limited ,  it can be hard enough to find a class that suits ( time / day ./ location  PAYG vs pay per term ...  as it is . )

 

Elitism is an interesting one   - give  the ubiquity  of attending  classes among   female children ,  there's a wider issue of participation in none  school  activities in some demographics  but  that  is nothign to do with the  activities and all to do with mindsets 

 

You often hear complaints / concerns that there is 'nothing to do'   for young people in a settlement , yet when you look into it ,  local   units of the various youth organisations folded  due to lack of  YP numbers  , not funding  or lack of adult  staff , LA youth provision was closed or  wound back due to lack of use   which made   that spend in that place harder to justify than other spending  which was showing results... 

 

Physique -  is it time for a 'let's knock Balanchine thread ?'   Ironically  for  men in dance  one of the best known  UK names  in ballet is someone with an 'none typical' physique   ( all 5 '2"  of Wayne Sleep) ...   arguably ballet should be physique independent ...   but  could a 5 '2"  danseur  effectively partner  a 5 '10"  ballerina is a traditonally  constructed  and choreographed pas de deux ?

 

I know gymnastics  introduced minimum ages for certain levels of  elite competition to  reduce the  move to  'over grown prepubescent' 14 and 15 year old  female competitors  ... 

Edited by mph
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I thought if you had RAD grade 8 you could teach up to that level but you had to have DDI/DDE to enter pupils for exams?

No - having RAD Grade 8 does not entitle you to teach or to call yourself an RAD teacher. There is of course nothing to stop anyone teaching RAD based syllabus lessons but they must not be advertised as RAD.

 

Only passing one or more of the RAD teaching certificates entitled you to teach.

 

The DDI/DDE is nothing to do with RAD. They are ISTD teaching qualifications & entitle you to teach & enter pupils for exams in the genre passed.

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access  may be an issue  , if adult ballet is zumbaised  - what about the adult beginner who  wants to study 'properly'  - are their options now severely limited ,  it can be hard enough to find a class that suits ( time / day ./ location  PAYG vs pay per term ...  as it is . )

 

Elitism is an interesting one   - give  the ubiquity  of attending  classes among   female children ,  there's a wider issue of participation in none  school  activities in some demographics  but  that  is nothign to do with the  activities and all to do with mindsets 

 

You often hear complaints / concerns that there is 'nothing to do'   for young people in a settlement , yet when you look into it ,  local   units of the various youth organisations folded  due to lack of  YP numbers  , not funding  or lack of adult  staff , LA youth provision was closed or  wound back due to lack of use   which made   that spend in that place harder to justify than other spending  which was showing results... 

 

Physique -  is it time for a 'let's knock Balanchine thread ?'   Ironically  for  men in dance  one of the best known  UK names  in ballet is someone with an 'none typical' physique   ( all 5 '2"  of Wayne Sleep) ...   arguably ballet should be physique independent ...   but  could a 5 '2"  danseur  effectively partner  a 5 '10"  ballerina is a traditonally  constructed  and choreographed pas de deux ?

 

I know gymnastics  introduced minimum ages for certain levels of  elite competition to  reduce the  move to  'over grown prepubescent' 14 and 15 year old  female competitors  ... 

We digress... with regard to physique, I'm not talking about Balanchine or anybody else, I'm talking about the long-held views of the general public, in that ballet isn't something they or their children could aspire to, as they believe that you have to be a certain shape.

 

And I don't think the OP has mentioned Zumba. :wacko:

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What I meant that the class would be an entirely SEPARATE class just for ballet though the original poster may be teaching other things maybe even Zumba as well.....eg employment at a Gym or Leisure Centre.

Personally I've never seen a ballet class that has been Zumba-ised though the expression makes me laugh!!

 

In fact I got back into ballet when a few years back after having done no exercise for about 15 years except swimming I joined a gym and did some Zumba ...yes ..loved it ....as the teacher was fun and totally amazing....and of course all the boring gym stuff ....for a while with a trainer who nearly killed me ......and then along came this Chi Ball class based on the Chinese seasons ......I really loved it and it was really quite balletic so it reminded me that perhaps I was then fit enough to seek out some ballet classes .....which I did.

 

I stopped going to the gym because I was only going in the end to do this Chi Ball class and swim and it was a very expensive membership!! Now I do quite a lot of ballet instead!!

But for me I did seek out teachers as Kate_N said .....who had been professional dancers but then retrained as teachers....or just had been teaching for years after a professional career.

However there is a class I go to every Saturday morning in a local studio which is being taught by somebody who has ta,Ken the Intermediate RAD Exam and is now studying to be a teacher. We are ALL adults and range from beginners up to intermediate level. There are often people in this drop in class who just want to learn a bit of ballet for a while. For me it's a VERY easy class but I really love it as it's the only class I go to in which I can really concentrate on the basics especially at the barre and its dancey enough in the centre to be enjoyable .....often split into two groups etc.

Even if the person teaching the class wasn't training to be a teacher most people in it would be very happy and the teacher gives good basic technique instructions for early learner ballet people.

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Just to add it's a "free style" class not an RAD one. Also the teacher is not training to teach through the RAD system but another ....maybe ISTD or something similar? Will have to ask next week!!

 

I'm thinking the original poster could do something like this .....a variety of dance / exercise type classes and a couple of ballet classes?

We are always trying to persuade the Saturday teacher to teach another class ....like an improvers class so he can go more slowly for the real beginners .....but some of these beginners are a game lot and keep at it .....one girl has these amazing feet to die for......though she doesn't realise it!! some even end up buying a pair of ballet shoes after a couple of months!! Always a breakthrough I think.

Anyway we all love the class in our own way and for different reasons.

Edited by LinMM
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What I meant that the class would be an entirely SEPARATE class just for ballet though the original poster may be teaching other things maybe even Zumba as well.....eg employment at a Gym or Leisure Centre.

Personally I've never seen a ballet class that has been Zumba-ised though the expression makes me laugh!!

 

 

i'm not knocking Zumba, but i have heard concerns voiced by some people that   the level of unpderpinning knowledge of some zumba teachers is marginal  and that  the 'system'  tolerates  this   ... 

 

I don't think anyone is suggestign that   moreclasses is a bad idea ,  but are bad classes  beneficial ? having had to 'un teach' bad habits in other  areas   where i am  more experienced  makes me wary  of an approach that  provides more  exposure by  lowering trainer standards  ( especially as the move in the UK in Vocational ( wider sense , not the  Performing arts use of the term)  trainign  and education is to increase the levles of  knowledge of both training / teaching /assessing theory and  the  subject matter knowledge ) 

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Legally you don't need any qualifications.

 

What training have you done already?

 

 

i'm not knocking Zumba, but i have heard concerns voiced by some people that   the level of unpderpinning knowledge of some zumba teachers is marginal  and that  the 'system'  tolerates  this   ... 

 

I don't think anyone is suggestign that   moreclasses is a bad idea ,  but are bad classes  beneficial ? having had to 'un teach' bad habits in other  areas   where i am  more experienced  makes me wary  of an approach that  provides more  exposure by  lowering trainer standards  ( especially as the move in the UK in Vocational ( wider sense , not the  Performing arts use of the term)  trainign  and education is to increase the levles of  knowledge of both training / teaching /assessing theory and  the  subject matter knowledge ) 

 

 

 

Surely if you are teaching non-syllabus ballet and no formal teaching qualifications are required then the level of underpinning knowledge of some ballet teachers could also be marginal.

 

It must surely be up to the individual wanting to take class to decide if the teaching in whatever form they want to do is adequate.

 

Many years ago I started learning Tai Chi.  When the class I went to moved to a time that I could not attend I found somewhere else and immediately realised that the person teaching was teaching bad technique (so I only went the once).

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On the whole if you have some experience you can recognise if the teacher is okay or not but a complete beginner probably wouldn't.

 

So it's up to them as adults to do a modicum of research on who is taking the class! Though this will not always turn up the best teachers.

 

I tend to be attracted to teachers who actually teach.....as opposed to just giving a class ....even if that class is quite nice etc. And there are plenty of teachers up in London doing just this.

 

But I could learn more from my Saturday teacher in Brighton who has only limited qualifications at the mo than some more highly qualified dancers/teachers whose classes I have done.....this is because he actually enjoys teaching!!

But we are all different ......some people once they've reached a certain level just want to do a set class and are not that bothered about being given any real instruction.

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If an instructor is teaching Zumba they will have passed exercise to music and then added on Zumba training. The etm course has a and p in it, a written and practical assessment. Of course, someone could just set themselves up. The law can be lax. (Not going off topic but just adding in that many Zumba teachers are qualified and regulated). Several dance teachers add this on as it attracts a new customer base.

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Following on from Lin M, years ago I use to attend Nicky Bentley's jazz classes at Pineapple. They were superb and you can still buy the Dvd. They were very popular and she was the first to say she was self taught.

I agree if you want a highly technical ballet class then you look for a very good teacher. The op said she just wanted to teach a 'free' ballet class and I would suggest it can be done.

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