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Ballet tickets cheaper than premier league football tickets


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I have no idea how much it costs to get to a premier match for an adult/ child? Is it well over £100? I’m not sure what point can be made comparing one incredibly expensive activity with another, clearly they would both be beyond the means of many given the average earnings in this country.

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14 minutes ago, Peony said:

I have no idea how much it costs to get to a premier match for an adult/ child? Is it well over £100? I’m not sure what point can be made comparing one incredibly expensive activity with another, clearly they would both be beyond the means of many given the average earnings in this country.

 

Am I misunderstanding this point? I've hardly ever paid above £30 for a ballet ticket with a perfectly acceptable view.

 

Edited to add - having checked, make that never!

Edited by Lizbie1
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12 minutes ago, Peony said:

I have no idea how much it costs to get to a premier match for an adult/ child? Is it well over £100? I’m not sure what point can be made comparing one incredibly expensive activity with another, clearly they would both be beyond the means of many given the average earnings in this country.

 

Particularly for the London clubs it can cost well over £100.  If you listen to the clip (I've linked the programme above) the cheapest price for seeing Arsenal play at home is £38 (and that is with a season ticket).  Many people on this board pay less than that to see the Royal Ballet at the Royal Opera House (see Lizbie's post above).

 

Another comparison would be between the cost of seeing the latest top group at a stadium and paying through the nose (when Beyonce was in Liverpool some years ago the top price was eye-watering (well over £100) - needless to say my niece changed her mind about going).

 

People often (me included) whinge about the potential cost of seeing a ballet at Covent Garden when, in actual fact, many others are paying the same or more to see a football match.  I would rather be sitting in a comfortable theatre than outside in a draughty stadium.

 

Other ballet companies located in other parts of the country usually have cheaper top price tickets but the price banding is not as wide as at ROH.

 

Where do you watch ballet Peony?  (I occasionally go to ROH but mostly Leeds, Birmingham, The Lowry).

 

 

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@Jan McNulty the answer is we watch very little ballet really as we just can’t afford it. Yes have been to local theatres (midlands) and BRB, ENB, NB, ballet Cymru, btuk.  The others are more affordable. With travel it’s still at least £200-300 for a family. I can’t really understand how that’s not a barrier to participation but they are more affordable than RB definitely. The equivalent of an Arsenal match is probably the royal ballet companies rather than the others though?  I don’t know a lot about football so can’t really compare but I don’t know anyone who watches premier matches on a season ticket/ regular basis either. Thanks for the link to the interview I will have a listen later. 

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22 minutes ago, Peony said:

I can’t really understand how that’s not a barrier to participation but they are more affordable than RB definitely.

 

FWIW when I've seen BRB at the Birmingham Hippodrome the ticket price has been at the top end of my range, and that's going for the cheapest seats.

 

Jan is correct to point out that RB ticket prices cover a much wider range than other companies. The >£100 tickets trnd to attract the most attention, but even for the aggressively priced Swan Lake my tickets are £29 for a seat I know I'll be happy with - if I'd been OK with standing or a less good view that would have been under £20.

 

If you mean the difference is the price of travel to London, that's another thing.

 

30 minutes ago, Peony said:

I don’t know a lot about football so can’t really compare but I don’t know anyone who watches premier matches on a season ticket/ regular basis either

 

I think the point being made was that ballet is considered elitist whereas football is not.

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2 hours ago, FionaE said:

There are plenty of £100+ priced seats


And for a number of ballets (triple bills and Dante), the maximum price has been well below £100. Then there can be pretty generous discounts for packages.

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Interestingly this seems to be quite a PR push for the ROH at the moment. It's only a few weeks ago that Marianela Nunez made a similar statement in an article in The Times.

My husband is a season ticket holder and his seats are c£50 per game for the roughly 17 included home games (depends on the league or something) in a relatively decent seast at the new Spurs stadium which did get me totting up some numbers....

 

Ballet can be considerably cheaper than £50 for a non-restricted view at Sadlers Wells and the Coliseum if focussing on London, but I suppose the challenge is for the ROH that views are either restricted, standing or rather far away from the action in comparison to a lot of the football tickets in discussion.  You've really got to know where the good 'cheap seats' are to get the best experience.

 

I think this sort of 'campaign' needs to go further though - there is the potential to cover their young ROH proposition where pricing is lower for under 25s - and fits nicely in the average football ticket pricing, but also I think they need to consider how to get older people in for the first time and consider their CRM programme. I know there are specialist arts marketing/advertising agencies, but I sometimes wonder, especially with today's bigger challenges post covid (as well as considering streaming) whether the ROH should be looking for bigger, broader media and creative strategy rather than thinking inside of an industry box.  I personally don't find their current advertising strategy to be particularly enticing in terms of encouraging people to buy tickets and giving them a reason to give it a go (other than trying something new) and ad creative isn't particularly inspiring. Bleat over.

 

 

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It’s much easier to obtain one reasonable ticket than a number of them together in general booking. I can rule out the cheapest prices because they’re either not available or not appropriate because they’re not a proper seat. 
 

I will give an example, to watch a blockbuster at my local cinema is £30 for a family ticket. For a performance it comes to £75 (even if it’s a Bolshoi performance repeated from 3 years ago!). Hence I’ve never taken my children. That is purely down to cost.
I got talking to a lady at a regional theatre and she said she’d seen Nureyev and Fonteyn there, that wouldn’t happen now. Smaller companies are doing a great job at getting to local venues but they don’t have the pull of the RB.  I totally agree with blossom above, they need to think bigger. 

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I'm not sure whether the ROH has a "current advertising strategy" - I don't think I've seen many adverts for anything this season, barring a one-page advert in one newspaper with "LA TRAVIATA" and the dates and place and very little else on it.  What am I missing?

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2 minutes ago, alison said:

I'm not sure whether the ROH has a "current advertising strategy" - I don't think I've seen many adverts for anything this season, barring a one-page advert in one newspaper with "LA TRAVIATA" and the dates and place and very little else on it.  What am I missing?

 

That is a welcome start at least!

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47 minutes ago, alison said:

I'm not sure whether the ROH has a "current advertising strategy" - I don't think I've seen many adverts for anything this season, barring a one-page advert in one newspaper with "LA TRAVIATA" and the dates and place and very little else on it.  What am I missing?

Yes, completely agree. Looked the same when they bought a full page in the Times to promote a streamed production when they reopened. Completely wrong ad in terms of creative and ad format, never mind whatever their approach in terms of who they thought they might reach… Money prob would have been better spent giving a number of people free access.

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