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Bournonville style, ideas, examples: The Flower Festival in Genzano PDD


MiSi
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Hello from a newcomer: I live in Copenhagen, home town (if not by birth) of Hans Christian Andersen and his good friend August Bournonville, of whom I am an ardent admirer and - dare I say it - scholar. Anything you want to know about his art, and the city, especially the arts, just ask. If I don't know, I know someone who does :)

 

May I thank you for your help and interest by linking to the most perfect, the most true to the Bournonville style, that is, version of the pas de deux (nothing else is left of the ballet, alas) from "The Flower Festival in Genzano":

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRR5JODzJHI

 

The Ballerina's name is Henriette Muus - not Muss - it is a very old Danish name, dating back to renaissance or even medieval times here, and she does it credit.

 

Bournonville style is not easy - romantic ballet was the cradle and nursery for ballet as we know it - not for the lazy or the weak :-) But it must look easy, with a natural flow to it.

 I studied with her mom, Jette Muus, not at her almost legendary school, we both studied at the Cph University (ballet history and more). She was great fun and very nice, though I've heard that she was a strict teacher.

 

I'm happy to hear that you like the PDD and style.

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That is so beautiful to watch!  Thanks for sharing the link.

 

In the 1980s, just as was beginning as a ballet-watcher, the BBC showed a television series called Dancer, presented by Peter Schaufuss.  He commented on the Bournonville style and one of the first things I saw was his production of La Sylphide for ENB (then London Festival Ballet) starring Eva Evdokimova and Peter Schaufuss himself.  I just fell in love with the style!

 

I love the very deft footwork and all the ballon and I think I like Ashton for the same reason.

 

One of the most joyous things (IMHO) to watch on a stage is Act 3 of Napoli!

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Thank you, Janet :)

 

Bonus info: When I first saw Johan on stage here in Cph he was partnering Henriette in the Peasant PDD in "Giselle". He did his solo bits beautifully, and when he was partnering he was very careful and attentive ( and quite nervous too). It was his first performance in that part. That was when I studied dance subjects at Cph Univ. and mentioned it to my professor, who said:"Yes, but he's only just turned 17".

The rest is history ;)

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There seems to be a similar quality to French ballet in this extract. I remember spending some time a while ago, watching a bunch of YouTube videos of the Grand Pas Classique, most of which were by Russian or French dancers. The Russian pairs seemed to be sending the subtext "look how perfectly I am executing this very difficult choreography - I might be making it look easy, but do not forget for a minute that it's actually very difficult and I've got it mastered, I hope you're impressed." The French pairs were just sailing through it, seeming to say "this is quite lovely and I'm happy to be here." I get the same feeling from those Danish dancers; they're not trying to impress the audience with their technical ability (which they obviously have in spades), they're telling their story and living the music.

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