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Tartan confusion


taxi4ballet
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Hi, I was wondering whether anyone with Scottish connections might be able to help...

 

I've been trying to discover which one applies to the surname Roy, and on different searches it comes up with either Robertson or MacGregor, with a number of different patterns/colours and I am now very confused.

 

Formal wedding-related, any advice gratefully received!

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I'm no genealogist, but you might want to try McIlroy or McElroy.  I think you'll find that 'Mac' and/or 'Mc' are anglicised versions of the Gaelic 'Mhic,' meaning 'Son of.'  The 'Roy' bit could derive from Gaelic 'ruadh' or 'red,' or, should you prefer, the French 'roi' or 'king.'

 

.... or McInroy?

 

http://www.kinlochanderson.com/tartan/mcinroy

 

Don't worry too much about it - most tartan designs are of relatively recent origin.  In fact, I'm not sure if the 1745/46 proscription on wearing kilts etc was ever lifted!

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Just looked in my "Clans and Tartans of Scotland" by Maria Costantino. Not sure how authentic this is as bought from a tourist shop.  The only Roy mentioned in the index is Rob Roy and this took me to the MacGregor tartan - Rob Roy MacGregor.  As you mention Roy is also listed as a surname with possible associations to Robertson but this does not appear in the list of surnames associated to MacGregor

 

Have you checked out the price of a kilt?  They are really expensive to hire let alone buy.  Have you contacted a supplier of kilts, I presume they would have to know all this as part of their job, or you could spend hours lost in the internet ;) 

 

Very envious of you, would love to attend a wedding in Scotland, all those men in kilts!!

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Thinking further on this, as a British subject (as I take the liberty to assume that you are), you may wear the Royal Stewart tartan.  Mainly in red, if that suits, and I fancy that you'd know the pattern on sight.  At a guess, it might give you much more choice if hiring than the tartan of a less-known family.  On the female side, I'd also suggest looking at the Dress version with a white background - very good for sashes and the like!

 

http://www.kinlochanderson.com/tartan/stewart+royal

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Thanks for the advice :)

 

It is for a rather posh, almost 'Society' wedding in England (we are guests) at a venue with a very formal dress code, and since I don't have a full-length ball gown  :wacko: I was thinking totally laterally, and of wearing something completely unexpected...

 

Will probably get something off eBay, as I doubt it will ever see the light of day again!

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T4B: Your thread has proved a diversion from the History of No 10 Squadron.  Until 20 minutes ago I'd no idea there was a 'Scottish Tartans Authority," though I rather suspect someone has awarded themselves the title.  Nonetheless, in pursuit of 'something completely unexpected,' you may find inspiration in some of the changing images at top right!

 

http://www.tartansauthority.com/highland-dress/scottish-weddings/

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If a particular name has been associated with different clans, you might want to do a bit of digging into your heritage to find out which branch of the family you belong to. That might help determine which of the two clans is the right one in your case.

Edited by Melody
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Very envious of you, would love to attend a wedding in Scotland, all those men in kilts!!

 

I have: Dunblane Cathedral, in fact.  And the Scottish dancing was fun.  And yes, there were quite a few men in kilts, although I can't remember whether the groom wore one - I presume he did, but my photos are in storage so I can't check.

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I have: Dunblane Cathedral, in fact.  And the Scottish dancing was fun.  And yes, there were quite a few men in kilts, although I can't remember whether the groom wore one - I presume he did, but my photos are in storage so I can't check.

By a coincidence, I've also been to a wedding in Dunblane (but in the RC church). I was, of course, bekilted (I have three) and, as you would expect, I thoroughly enjoyed the dancing - blowing my own trumpet, I was a sought-after partner! ;)

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