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Flat-spins?!


alison
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Okay, in a moment of boredom yesterday I got around to reading the RB's current pointe shoe appeal http://www.roh.org.uk/support/donations/fundraising-appeals/pointe-shoes-appeal

 

It says:

"Flat-spins [Ed Watson's shoes] are 3/4 of the length of a normal flat and allow the dancer to manipulate their foot (literally spin it round) without any risk of the shoe loosening."  I'm having difficulty in visualising this, and Google hasn't been helpful.  Ed's shoes have always looked full-length to me: can anyone elucidate, please?

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All I can think is that the sole might only be 3/4 length, much like a pointe shoe with a 3/4 or even 1/2 length shank? Either that or the canvas part of the shoe only covers the front 3/4 of the foot, leaving only elastic round the heel....maybe?

 

Something like this perhaps: http://www.dancewearsolutions.com/dance_shoes/modern_and_lyrical/B220.aspx

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Hmm, not sure.  Given the number of times I've seen Ed in masterclasses/insight events over the years, I think I'd have noticed if he was wearing something as unconventional as that.  Plus they're split-soles, so I don't quite know how that relates to the 3/4 business.

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  • 4 weeks later...

It could be that the pleates that are stitched into the sole are shorter. There for creating a very snug fit, rather than going for a smaller size and stretching them out. He has perhaps shortened the heel length of the shoe as well. Again creating a very snug shoe that stays put. Plus as they are made to measure the dancers actual foot, it is likely they are shaped to fit into that stunning arch, again making the shoe shorter. Just my opinion anyway........ Probs nothing like that at all but it makes sence to me! ????

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