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drdance

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  1. It sounds like you have a good relationship with your teacher. Times are hard for teachers and we're all feeling the pinch financially, and emotionally as it has been incredibly stressful trying to keep going. I'd steer well clear of a competition school without syllabus classes. A lack of syllabus classes alone isn't an indicator of a poor teacher, but the combination of no syllabus classes plus emphasis on competition makes me concerned. Instead of looking further afield, talk to your current teacher. If she knows what she's talking about, she'll agree that a keen child would be
  2. Tulip, all I can say is - if you feel able - share the information you have. It can be anonymous but I believe that all the institutions where abuse has happened need to be held to account and enough noise made so that the collective voice is finally heard. I also say this to any other parents or adults who experienced bad practice during their dance training, to become part of this movement. I understand that it is hard and traumatic and many people do not want to go over the past and that is completely ok too. But if you’re still angry and you want to be heard, there is now finally
  3. I wrote this a while ago and this is a good place to start, I feel.
  4. Sorry to hear your DD has been affected by all of this. I don’t know anything about the college itself but I would always be interested in the destinations of their graduates, and the percentage of each year group who get jobs (or who go into further training). To me it looks like a very commercial course preparing dancers for work in cruises, entertainment industry etc so that might be a consideration ( and a potential change in focus from her previous course?). I also always encourage any parent or prospective student to find out about student wellbeing, healthcare, physi
  5. The trouble is - no one will put their head above the parapet and shout loudly enough that things are not ok. While there are lots of wonderful dance teachers out there, there are also some poor students who have been bullied, mistreated and worse. Where do these people go to report this when it’s not technically illegal? Bad practice needs to be a thing of the past but unless people can report it, it will keep going.
  6. Hi everyone, ITV news are now looking into the historic culture of abuse (of all kinds) in dance - bullying, physical abuse, inappropriate conduct etc etc and are taking anonymous reports from parents and dancers at ballet@itv.com. While I understand some people may not wish to go over things that have happened, I would urge anyone with anything they no longer want to keep silent to go forward. They have assured me that anonymity will be preserved. Please forward this message to anyone you know who has a story to tell. Thanks Emily
  7. With such a small age gap between students and teaching staff, one can only assume that they anticipated such a situation arising (albeit innocently perhaps) and could then defend themselves if it went awry..... 😡
  8. I may be wrong - and happy to be corrected - but I believe the immediate withdrawal of backing from Bath Spa affects the status of the qualification that the graduating cohort have worked for 3 years for ie 3 years working for a degree that will not be awarded. Plus funding etc withdrawn for all current students. Very sad and not fair to punish the students like this.
  9. Definitely trained or 'trainable'! The Danish teacher and choreographer Bournonville was well-known for his love of ballon and trained dancers specifically to achieve this, focusing on reducing the amount of contact time with the floor and using a speedy plie in between jumps. The allegro in RAD Grade 7 was inspired by his style. Interestingly this is a technique used in plyometric training too! (It is known as making the most of a muscle's stretch-shortening cycle).
  10. Box jumps are scary. Fact! Interestingly though, you feel like you “jumped” that distance, and it’s true that your feet moved that distance. But in order to move your feet that distance, as you said, you had to really lift up your knees and land with very bent legs. Therefore it’s unlikely (unless you started the jump in the same position that you landed in) that you jumped the whole distance - sorry! As you’ve discovered though, box jumps are a great way to improve your jump for dance - it’s to do with the number of landings and take-offs as much as anything.
  11. New to you! I first learned about it being recommended for dancers in 2004, but it has been used in sport for much longer.
  12. Because 1) in basketball the better players are taller, because they score more points, which is the aim of the game. In ballet the aim is more subjective, so it’s not as easy to say what is and isn’t desirable. Is the aim to dance beautifully and move audiences? In which case does body type matter? 2) People cannot change their height. So anyone who struggles to get selected for a career in basketball for this reason accepts this reality and seeks a different career, and plays for fun. Many dancers are told to change their body shape (which isn’t actually easy) so end up having issue
  13. It is possible that they are monitoring weight to make sure it’s not going down. Artistic staff see the students in a leotard and tights, but they aren’t always “switched on” enough to identify if someone has an issue.
  14. Here's an interesting piece featuring students at Elmhurst - listening to them talk shows they have an awareness of a strong healthy body but that they're still worried about look. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/entertainment-arts-53385004
  15. I too hope artistic staff have been educated as it is often those comments that lead to issues. There's some crossover here between the thread about 'how to change the shape of thighs' and I hope that people will hear those students talking on the video, repeatedly about being strong athletes. Great work from @Nico Kolokythas and the health team.
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