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Question about floors.


Pups_mum
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Our dance studio has recently moved premises, and DD has started complaining that her ankles are aching after class, since the move. She is attributing it to the change of floor. Both the old and new studios have sprung floors, but DD says that the new floor is more "springy". Now, it would make sense to me if the new floor was less springy, but I can't quite figure out why a more springy floor would make her ankles ache? My own theory is that its more likely to be due to impending GCSEs having caused somewhat sporadic attendance at class and a bit of a downturn in general fitness/wellbeing, but just thought I would ask if anyone on here has any experience of a change of floor causing anything like this?

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Hi pups_mum. It can do - it's all to do with the amount of energy the floor absorbs. The more absorbent the surface, the more work you have to do to jump off it but a more springy surface needs less work to jump off it.

 

However when landing on a springy floor and not wanting to jump back into the air again, the joints have to absorb some of the rebound in order to control the landing from a jump or even a springy releve (think trying to stop bouncing on a trampoline but not quite so extreme!)

 

Or.... You could be right and she's tired/getting a bit burnt out! The stress hormone cortisol can affect recovery after exercise and can even be a factor in chronic injury if present in high enough levels so if someone is under some emotional stress it can slow down physical healing.

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I have had the experience of a too springy floor being more difficult upon which to dance.   I found it was a matter of balance rather than in the jumps themselves.  There is a constant movement in the foot-ankle to maintain balance and when the floor is too spongy that amount of movement is increased and thus the joint is stressed.

 

So - I would not limit the problem to jumps.

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Thanks all. That makes sense. I had been thinking about the stress on the joints that would be caused by landing on a floor with no "give" in it, but not considered the additional work to be done maintaining stability on a more springy floor.

I suspect there are probably multiple factors involved in why DD is a bit below par at present, hopefully she will perk up shortly.

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