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Ian Macmillan

Carlos Acosta says he will retire after 2015-16 Season

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Oooh, a new Carmen...

 

I'm surprised he's still on this kick about young people these days going into ballet for money and fame. I thought it was a notoriously poorly paid profession and that these days most ballet dancers are pretty well unknown outside the narrow world of ballet itself. If you want money and fame in the performing arts, ballet would be quite a long way down the list of things to get into.

 

I hope, rather than getting someone to choreograph him sitting down, he'll continue in the ballet world in some capacity. As long as he has the interest and talent to stage new ballets, I do hope this upcoming Carmen won't be his last new venture.

Edited by Melody

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I find it rather a shame that Carlos continues to criticise the younger generation for seeking opportunity, fame and fortune (even if that is the case). After all, didn't he, himself, leave Cuba with similar dreams in view?

 

He makes a fair point about the continuing need to aspire and work hard, however.

 

In his recent performances Carlos has given me, at least, the distinct feeling that he is now struggling to maintain his form. So I am pleased that he is not planning to linger on past 2016 - but, thereby, to make way for up and coming talent.

Edited by capybara

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I'm surprised he's still on this kick about young people these days going into ballet for money and fame. I thought it was a notoriously poorly paid profession and that these days most ballet dancers are pretty well unknown outside the narrow world of ballet itself. If you want money and fame in the performing arts, ballet would be quite a long way down the list of things to get into.

 

 

 

Yeah I didn't get that either. Very weird observation.

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I thought he was supposed to be retiring at the end of next season.  Mind you, I also heard that he'd given his last "white-tights ballet prince" performance a couple of years ago - and then he went and did some more.

 

Also, his Don Q was largely based on existing choreography, wasn't it?  Has he ever choreographed a full-length (as I assume this will be) ballet from scratch before?

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I think Carmen would be a great ballet to do for the Royal.

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I find it rather a shame that Carlos continues to criticise the younger generation for seeking opportunity, fame and fortune (even if that is the case). After all, didn't he, himself, leave Cuba with similar dreams in view?

 

He makes a fair point about the continuing need to aspire and work hard, however.

 

In my view, criticisism of some young dancers can be also a fair point.

I don’t think that fame and fortune were necessarily Carlos’ overriding dreams. Given his background it seems to be natural for this talented dancer to dream of seeing the big world, to use greater opportunities, to enjoy artistic freedom and to realise himself in this world. There are so many other dreams that people can cherish. And if Carlos regrets that for some young dancers fame and fortune are more important, he is entitled to say so.

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In my view, criticisism of some young dancers can be also a fair point.

I don’t think that fame and fortune were necessarily Carlos’ overriding dreams. Given his background it seems to be natural for this talented dancer to dream of seeing the big world, to use greater opportunities, to enjoy artistic freedom and to realise himself in this world. There are so many other dreams that people can cherish. And if Carlos regrets that for some young dancers fame and fortune are more important, he is entitled to say so.

 

 

I don't think anyone is saying he isn't entitled to say it, it's just that it is an odd thing to say; ballet doesn't bring you fame or fortune, so it would be a surprise if that was the overriding motivation for young ballet dancers. There isn't one ballet dancer today that is really famous (in the UK, don't know about other countries) and I doubt any of them are rich. As Melody pointed out, if you want fame or fortune, you wouldn't try and become a ballet dancer.

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I love the music for Carmen and have often thought it would make a great full-length ballet as I dislike the Roland Petit shortened version. However, I don't like the sound of Carlos' version being 'modern and direct'. I would prefer a more traditional version or at least one like The Winter's Tale which blends classical choreagraphy with more modern movements. Joan

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I don't think anyone is saying he isn't entitled to say it, it's just that it is an odd thing to say; ballet doesn't bring you fame or fortune, so it would be a surprise if that was the overriding motivation for young ballet dancers. There isn't one ballet dancer today that is really famous (in the UK, don't know about other countries) and I doubt any of them are rich. As Melody pointed out, if you want fame or fortune, you wouldn't try and become a ballet dancer.

 

I think Mr Acosta himself may be really that famous!  Even my football loving ex-colleagues had heard of him some years ago when he was appearing at the Lowry as part of the Manchester International Festival.  He sold out several performances of the main theatre in the Lowry with a programme that would probably not have sold at all well with any of the main companies and I heard people saying they had come to see Carlos (sic)!

 

I love the music for Carmen and have often thought it would make a great full-length ballet as I dislike the Roland Petit shortened version. However, I don't like the sound of Carlos' version being 'modern and direct'. I would prefer a more traditional version or at least one like The Winter's Tale which blends classical choreagraphy with more modern movements. Joan

 

Northern Ballet had a wonderful full-length version of Carmen created by Didi Veldman.  It was reset in modern-day Brazil and worked wonderfully well.  Charlotte Broom (now Headspace Dance) and Daniel de Andrade created the roles of Carmen and Jose and all I can say is WOW!

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NB's Carmen is arguably my favourite production of theirs: I was so disappointed when it wasn't revived.

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I don't think anyone is saying he isn't entitled to say it, it's just that it is an odd thing to say; ballet doesn't bring you fame or fortune, so it would be a surprise if that was the overriding motivation for young ballet dancers. There isn't one ballet dancer today that is really famous (in the UK, don't know about other countries) and I doubt any of them are rich. As Melody pointed out, if you want fame or fortune, you wouldn't try and become a ballet dancer.

 

 
It was said that “it rather a shame”. I didn’t see it in this light, so I disagreed.
 
That’s true that no dancer in the UK enjoys the same degree of fame as David Beckham or Bruce Forsyth, for example. However, why the same Carlos Acosta can sell the whole Coliseum for a week while whole companies fail to do it sometimes? Because he is famous.
Principals are well paid as members of their own company and as guest stars. So aspiring dancers cherish hope that they will be lucky to achieve the same success. And the added glitter of Fairies and Princes’ attire, armfuls of bouquets and the roaring opera house when one appears in the spotlight. All this is fine. But Carlos works with young dancers everyday and said in the interview what concerns him.
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I had a bad feeling that Carlos Acosta would retire at the end of 2015, in Song of the Earth, so I'm relieved he has 2 more seasons ahead, Carmen sounds the right ballet for him to do :)

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It was said that “it rather a shame”. I didn’t see it in this light, so I disagreed.

 

That’s true that no dancer in the UK enjoys the same degree of fame as David Beckham or Bruce Forsyth, for example. However, why the same Carlos Acosta can sell the whole Coliseum for a week while whole companies fail to do it sometimes? Because he is famous.

Principals are well paid as members of their own company and as guest stars. So aspiring dancers cherish hope that they will be lucky to achieve the same success. And the added glitter of Fairies and Princes’ attire, armfuls of bouquets and the roaring opera house when one appears in the spotlight. All this is fine. But Carlos works with young dancers everyday and said in the interview what concerns him.

Just to add my tuppence worth, Carlos' fame is immaterial to my teenage dd and those of her close friends who devote every hour available to ballet. My dd dances because - in her words - she has to. She would be happy being paid a pittance to dance, if it meant getting a rare and treasured contract in a classical ballet company. Fame and fortune certainly aren't what motivates the teenage dancers I know to get up at 6 am every Saturday to go to Associates.

 

I think Mr Acosta is doing young dancers a disservice.

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I agree ballet is such hard work to be successful in and it won't necessarily get any easier.....it's a fight all the way for most dancers.

 

There are far easier ways to achieve fame and make money than be a ballet dancer.

I think others have said this......just agreeing with them.

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