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Second Opinion


tutoo2much
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I just wondered how people went about getting a second opinion with regards to their child's potential for ballet. Seems hard to know where to start. Anyone already teaching them, whether home or associate teacher may have a vested interest in their opinion, yet I am not sure how you would find someone else, or if it is an accepted thing to be doing.

 

In some ways an audition is an opinion, but without feedback you may be none the wiser as to why you were given a yes no or maybe.

 

editted to add a sentence.

Edited by tutoo2much
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It can be very valuable and is often done. You find another teacher who has nothing to do with the present school. You should inform the teacher of whom you are seeking a second opinion that this is your goal - not an ongoing class - but a second opinion. Don't tell her any of the problems which led to this - let her form her/him own opinion completely unbiased.

 

(please excuse a huge picture which might come up as my signature - I meant it to be tiny - but it didn't work out that way. I am trying to get rid of it. ACK

 

(ok - I think I got rid of it for this reply)

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It is not at all an odd request. I've had that happen many times.

 

 

 

Well, I do want the picture - but very small. Just don't depend upon that "undo" thingie.

 

I tried photobucket but it seems they want to charge me to be able to download a picture to this site.

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I think often we're too quick to accept what one person says when it's only their opinion on the day. I think that a totally unbiased person would give valuable feedback and certainly this could be done by another teacher who doesn't know or teach the child. Have tried this myself and it's well worth doing.

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Interesting you should mention that. I was reading a *very* back issue of Dancing Times the other day, where the esteemed Maria Fay was asked for a second opinion on what appeared to be a dancer with marvellous potential, who had been turned down for a prestigious ballet school, I think it was. In a nutshell, her response was that the dancer was indeed physically ideal, but was severely let down by her response to music, or lack of it, and possibly other artistic considerations. So you do need to be prepared to hear things you might not want to ...

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Absolutely. But it also depends on the age of the child in question, and how much store you're going to set by the opinions given. One Director of Dance at one school said that my dd would never have a career as a dancer as she displayed no personality whilst dancing. My daughter was 10 at the time, and extremely shy.

 

In the last few years dd has blossomed in terms of technique, grace, and a lovely serene presence whilst dancing. She is still very shy, but is slowly learning to let the rest of the world in to share her love of dance. She is still determined to apply for Upper Schools at 16. I never told her what that Director of Dance said.

 

You do have to make a choice whether to take feedback on board, and when. I was going to say that by 16 or 18 it will be evident whether a student has the potential to get a classical contract, and in most cases I suspect this is true - but then look at Melissa Hamilton? Only one teacher at her Upper School saw her potential.....

 

If a child dances for their whole childhood and youth, but it never comes to anything professionally, I still don't think they have wasted time or money. As long as they have enjoyed it. :-)

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