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question about darning thread


Anna C
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This will prove that despite being a Moderator, I am still able to ask daft questions. :-D

 

Previously when darning around the edge of the platforms of dd's pointes, I have used embroidery thread like this, in a double strand: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/10-Anchor-Embroidery-Cotton-Thread-Floss-Plz-See-All-Items-/221277079009?pt=UK_Thread_Floss_1&hash=item33852445e1

 

However, I've run out and need to darn her new shoes today. What I do have at home is a roll of this from Freed: http://www.freedusa.com/ballet/2_3_3f_ballet.html

 

Now obviously the roll of crochet thread is a fair bit thinner so my question is do I need three strands of this, knotted together, or even four, to get an equivalent thickness to the thick embroidery thread? If anyone darns with the same crotchet thread, how many strands do you use?

 

Thank you - hope someone can help (and I told you it was a daft question!)

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It is - thank you! The reason I like it a bit thicker is that I darn a ridge of double stitches around the edge of the platform, but leave the centre of the platform un-darned. I think if I only use a single strand I might not get the desired "ridge" - if that makes sense! :-) I know some professional dancers use string!

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I just use one strand too, having made the switch from embroidery thread to the crochet yarn a couple of years ago for the same reason as you.  I do the ends aswell though.  I would start with one strand and go back round if you do not get the desired effect.  It is always easier to add more stitching than try an undo some.

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This sounds difficult. Do the girls get taught how to darn?

My dd isn't at Vocational school - I do her darning on the basis that I have the time and she doesn't. I taught myself with the aid of this site, google and Youtube! It's not difficult, just time consuming. My first pair were a bit of a sad effort but fortunately every pair looks neater and (apparently) feels better!

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I have used both two and one thread of the crochet yarn depending on how thick it is - the one I have at the moment is a little 'softer' but thicker so only using one.  I would normally use two and chain stitch the whole platform - in rows though, I cant manage the circles!!

 

 

This sounds difficult. Do the girls get taught how to darn?

 

To be honest it doesnt matter how neat it is - best just to get on and have a go.  I usually do the running stictch around the outside and start her off with the first row but then my DD can manage the rest.  There is no wrong way to be honest, its all about grip not neatness!

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Did the ballet teacher not teach them how to do it then?

I'm not sure I'd have the time in between my two jobs and both kids. Hopefully when the time comes dd can either do it herself (on the long far journeys) or it can be a job sub contracted out to my mother in law!!!

Hehe, or you can always send them to Frangipani!

 

No, the ballet teacher didn't teach the girls - but she did admire my darning. :-D

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I have always used the Freed thread doubled. One ball seems to last forever unlike the shoes.

 

DD had a number of pairs from wardrobe, one shoe had been darned around the edge with string as you say S&P. Always wondered how they managed that as we struggle to get the crochet thread through the fabric. 

Edited by Jane
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Yes, that's what I have. :-)

 

Well, I went with just a double strand of the thinner crochet thread but I went around twice. The shoes are done and are standing up on their own which is usually a good sign, so that's another job done!

 

Thank you everyone. :-)

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Dd not on pointe yet but I have my 35 year old ball of crochet thread still in my sewing basket waiting! My Mum never touched a pointe shoe in her life, I did every single one. Have just checked my 30 years old last pair of pointe shoes and it was double thread chain stitch on the end spiralling around and blanket stitch (single thread I think but shoes so battered there I can't be sure) on the sole section (forgotten what that part is called). Is it a record to pass an original 35 year old ball of crochet thread on? It doesn't look perished!

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Anjuli that made me laugh! On Saturday I served a customer with pointe shoes and at the till I asked if she was ok taking off her old ribbons and washing as she had said her daughter had only worn them a short time before outgrowing them.

 

Both mother and daugher looked at me as if I'd fallen off the moon...I sold a pair of ribbons!

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We had that problem too loulabelle with ribbons, frayed up the sides and at the ends so tatty to use again.   I switched to the bloch elastorib (having seen previous recommendation by spannerand pony) and they are very strong ribbons so fraying has not been a problem since. 

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I put clear nail varnish on the ends of the ribbons to stop them fraying.  I always keep a bottle in my little sewing kit when I go to teach.  I also use it to stop ladders in tights as well.  I have to carry a sewing/emergency kit with me as I frequently have to sew on ribbons that have fallen off, because they were sewn on any old way with a few stitches.  If I were only paid for every set of ribbons that I've sewn on for my pupils, I'd be a rich woman today!  Nobody seems to know how to sew here - it's usually Grandma that does it or an actual seamstress (who of course has no clue where the ribbons should be sewn. :angry:

Edited by Dance*is*life
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My dd's ribbons always fray and as a result get shorter and shorter due to the ends being trimmed. So I couldn't use them again. This happens even though I pass them through a flame to seal the end. Anyone got any good tips to prevent the fraying?

I've found that cutting them on an angle and then setting light to the ends usually works better then cutting them straight. 

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