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Best place/way to sew pointe shoe ribbons&elastics


Ballet7
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I would say wherever you need them - just like any brand of shoe - some people like to fold the back of the shoe down and angle the ribbons towards the back of the shoe. My dd prefers them slightly towards the arch, at a less steep angle.

 

Are you using elastic ribbon like Bloch elastorib, or normal ribbon?

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I have found trial and error helps! Initially I tried sewing them at an angle as spanner describes, but then getting my dd to try them out. The first pair, I then had to take off and try again. Frustrating but worth it in the end. My dd also likes them closer to her arch as she feels her foot is more supported. She also wears elastics, sewed in a similar place to non ribbon shoes. Not sure if this varies according to the shoe. I have also found some surprisingly helpful films on you tube. EYB give some useful tips on their site...or at least they used to.

 

Edited due to dodgy spelling!

Edited by Ja Sm
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When I had gaynors I found them hard to sew due to the thick fabric. But I placed my ribbons and elastic in the same way as I do for all my other shoes. Personally I didn't get on with gaynors and neither did they suit my feet... If you are having more issues like Anjuli said, speak to your teacher :)

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  • 1 month later...

hhmm, ok so I have read all the great advise on the forum, watched the videos on youtube, read leaflets, so why am I so nervous........Sewing ribbons on first pair of pointe shoes! 

My advice - pin them first, get your dd to (carefully) try them. That way they can be adjusted before you've sewn them!

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I find Gaynors really difficult to sew ribbons to. A student's kept coming off and normally if that happens in class, I whip out my needle and re-sew them so that they can continue to dance. I could not sew through the thick material and we ended up using a safety pin! Her Mum kept trying and they just kept falling off. In the end I think she took them to a seamstress who sewed them on with a machine, but you have to be very careful that you can still pull the drawstrings, which for some reason are on the side. I'm glad they've changed the design and fabric somewhat, perhaps that will help. In theory the elastics get sewn on either side of the achilles tendon on the heel, so as to stop the backs slipping off and the ribbons in the usual place (folding the back over to find the spot).

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  • 9 months later...

My DD has just got her first point shoes (Gaynors) and I'm about to sew on the elastics and ribbons. We thought the elastics would be in the usual place over the arch of the foot and the ribbons a bit further back, towards the heel (i.e. the opposite way round to the above post)? Now I'm not sure what to do!

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Hi anneeliz,

 

I always sew ribbons first because elastics aren't always necessary. Better IMHO to wear the shoes with just ribbons first and then see if elastics are needed (e.g. If the heel persistently slips down).

 

Some people do cross the elastics over the arch but in my experience that is for people with highly arched or "banana" feet who need pulling back off pointe, or if they feel as if they are falling out of the shoe. If that isn't a problem but you still want elastic to stop the heel slipping off, then I would use one piece of elastic in a loop; sew each end at the back of the shoe either side of the achilles.

 

Does that make sense?

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DD doesn't have Gaynors but her pointe shoe ribbons are sewn further back than the 'folding down the back of the shoe' method, not as angled forward (ie more upright) and with the ribbon on the outside of the foot slightly further back than the other ribbon. Her elastics are sewn on either side of the heel seam, down by the sole of the shoe rather than just under the binding as she feels that this feels safer.

 

I also recommend pinning the ribbons and elastics in place before they are sewn so that angles and positioning can be adjusted as required.

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We posted at the same time, spannerandpony! DD does have very arched feet but doesn't have crossed elastics as she finds that one elastic around the ankle - but sewn further down the shoe than many of her friends - works for her. Having said that, she also uses vamp elastic when she feels it's necessary to stop the feeling that she is going to 'fall out of' the shoes, so perhaps crossed elastics might also work for her.

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My DD has just got her first point shoes (Gaynors) and I'm about to sew on the elastics and ribbons. We thought the elastics would be in the usual place over the arch of the foot and the ribbons a bit further back, towards the heel (i.e. the opposite way round to the above post)? Now I'm not sure what to do!

 

If this is her first pair of pointe shoes and your dd has been fitted over half term I would not sew them at all until her teacher has checked them - she can then advice where to put the ribbons/elastics to best suit your dd foot. 

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Thank you for your replies. My inclination is definitely to wait until her teacher has seen them and get her to mark where to sew them (even though my DD wants me to do them straightaway now, if not before!). There do seem to be a variety of different possible places according to the individual's foot.

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I would agree with sewing at a slight angle in the direction of the arch as described by others. If you also see them deeper into the shoe so they come right down to near the sole of the shoe it helps to ensure that the ribbon gives optimum support in terms of helping to keep the shoes snug again re the foot.

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