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The ROH booking website - what can we do?


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4 hours ago, art_enthusiast said:

Just a quick question, how are people returning tickets?

 

I've got to return one as I have a friend who has Covid and will not be able to attend a Bajazet performance with me on Saturday 12th February, 7.15pm. I've called multiple times, been put on hold constantly, and they also haven't responded to my email regarding the refund for ticket credit. It seems they are incapable of responding in any way at all...

 

As I understand it, they tend to prioritise the performances taking place soonest, which makes sense.  And it's been the situation for years that you can only ask for returns by email - that's nothing to do with Covid.

 

Quote

For any ticketing queries, please email boxoffice@roh.org.uk. Due to the current high volume of enquiries it is taking up to 10 days for the team to respond. 

 

I know that last time I "returned" a ticket - which was several weeks ago - I raised an eyebrow at the time it was said to be taking.  Unfortunately, I've deleted the email - but it was already a long time back then.

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4 hours ago, art_enthusiast said:

Just a quick question, how are people returning tickets?

 

I've got to return one as I have a friend who has Covid and will not be able to attend a Bajazet performance with me on Saturday 12th February, 7.15pm. I've called multiple times, been put on hold constantly, and they also haven't responded to my email regarding the refund for ticket credit. It seems they are incapable of responding in any way at all...

Art_entusiast, I would have advised returning this on 9 Feb, but looks like you’ve returned it already. So the only thing I can suggest is to try not to think about it and try not to worry- the ticket credit should go in by 15 February (sometimes earlier). It’s not always possible (or likely) to get the money/credit back immediately- there’s always a slight wait, but I have never seen a return declined when it’s due to Covid. 

 

NB on the plus side, ROH does not charge a booking fee, for which I’m v pleased/grateful/both, which is probably what makes me buy their tickets and attend very often! 

Edited by Emeralds
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All frustrating reading thanks for those sharing tips for upcoming booking days.

 

I never really understood what was wrong with the ‘old’ website from 2-3 years ago - booking was never an issue, seat views available and everything clearly laid out. Perhaps it looked too newspaper/informative rather than art/design focused. I preferred the old design anyway as it was practical but the new site would be fine if the booking worked.

 

like another has mentioned I often get 404 page not found for upcoming productions (usually resolves in a day or two but not good if someone new is looking to buy/for information so terrible marketing) and the fact the seat view with booking disappeared was always an illogical and sad choice to me (now it’s seemingly back but seems to be less user friendly involving more clicks than previously, when it works). 
 

I remember booking being an issue for Winter with the website down. I called up and was told I could book my tickets via phone at 10am (likely to involve long waiting times) or keep constantly refreshing the page in the hope it would fix. For those of us that have jobs/plans and schedule in time to book and for performances which we know will be popular this is not good enough. It causes unnecessary stress and agitation. (And for those without jobs similar as I imagine no one wants to sit refreshing for potential hours at an end.) 
 

It’s not the staff’s fault who are doing their best but management needs to resolve this as it’s been continuing for far too long now. 

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The opening of priority booking has always been stressful, but in recent years the ROH website evolved to be pretty robust and fairly straightforward to use (though the new flashy, image and effects-rich 'front-end' makes it somewhat more difficult to navigate in a hurry) and my stress levels subsided accordingly.

 

So, it was a bit of a shock last Tuesday when I breezed into the first date, selected tickets, put them in the basket and clicked the link to pick another, only to be faced with an error page. Much frantic clicking, refreshing and general panic resulted in multiple errors, an empty basket and a mix of stress and annoyance. Some of the errors were '404 page not found ' errors, but I would say the majority (though I wasn't counting) were ' 500 internal server' errors - was I the only person to get those? I ask because any website worth its salt should not be generating '500' errors - it smacks of poor implementation or testing.

 

The email advice* eventually sent out by the ROH (clearing caches, etc) covers problems where the browser's interactions with the target website are influenced (maybe inappropriately if the website itself has changed in the meantime) by its previous interactions with the site; it may end up requesting a resource that does not exist and the generic error page is served instead of the (non-existent) one - it's an error, but at least the request concludes 'gracefully'. However, the '500 internal server' error indicates that the website tried to fulfil what may or may not have been an appropriate request by the user's browser, but tied itself in so many knots that it failed to finish the request.

 

The ROH website has sat behind a 'waiting room' system for quite a while now, and that has prevented problems caused, as booking opens, by high volumes of requests overwhelming the ability of the site's servers to handle those requests (the actual system used by the ROH is not novel, by the way - I've visited at least one site in the last week that has a similar 'walking person' graphic and the same chime once entry is permitted). Nevertheless, the opening of booking is bound to attract unusually high traffic, so if there are hidden weaknesses in the site's operation they are more likely to manifest at those times.

 

What's changed between the comparatively smooth operation of the booking site last year and the debacle of last week is the introduction and parallel running of an alternative booking system; so it's reasonable to conclude that that's to blame. One would hope (expect!) that in return for receiving bucket loads of cash from the ROH, the developers would stress-test their new system beforehand rather than just going 'big bang' and relying on the paying punters to test it 'live' on the day.

I'm sure they did, but a lot of the stress-testing would have been automated and, crucially, I would guess that the automated browsers interacting with the site would have been nice and clean and well-behaved, not like the 'unwashed' browsers of the hundreds of real users trying to access the site on Tuesday or Thursday - sullied by old data and behaviours arising from their prior interactions with the 'old' system. Under such circumstances it would be little wonder if the reconfigured site found itself tying itself in knots. The developers may well have asked individual 'real' users, maybe some from this forum, to test the system beforehand and provide feedback, but that wouldn't have replicated the bun-fight that is the opening of booking.

 

I managed to get tickets eventually. I tried using the Firefox browser on my PC rather than Chrome but that didn't work, so I tried my phone (which I have previously used to browse the site but not buy tickets). The phone, unlike the browser on my PC, asked if I wanted to try their new system (it was recommended); I said 'yes' and managed to buy the tickets I wanted with comparatively little hassle beyond the uncertainty of poking at tiny blobs (aka seats) on a tiny screen with a big finger.

I breathed a huge sigh of relief when the email confirmation of the purchase came through 10 mins later and then thought 'why the hell should I be breathing a sigh of relief for accomplishing something that every other big site I use on the web just does with minimum drama?

 

It's embarrassing, ROH; it's embarrassing.


*Someone with a much better knowledge than me about how the web works said that the ROH's email advice is the standard 'boilerplate' advice that covers a multitude of sins - most of them unknown, and most of them caused the web designers; it fobs users off and implicitly shifts the blame to them. A well-designed system should be able to handle any old requests that are thrown at it, especially when the volume of requests is already being regulated by a 'waiting room' system at the front. There are few, if any, excuses.


 

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It is bizarre, when you think about it,  to write to your customers offering them hints and tips on how to battle through a minefield of problems to - er- buy your product....

 

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And why, for the past few weeks (months?), do I have to battle through an imaginary "waiting room" every time I want to look at ticket availability?  Given that quite a few of those times have been in the early hours of the morning, when I don't imagine that the site is overwhelmed by callers, and that I usually get through in second or two, it seems totally unnecessary.

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I’m very sorry to read of all the difficulties people have had with their bookings. I completed my booking in 10 minutes as usual, albeit on 25 January so probably without the volume of users this week. The only issue I had was ballet rehearsals showing up as £0 when selecting them but when I went to pay the correct prices were charged.

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On 05/02/2022 at 08:07, Geoff said:

Past experience shows that however carefully and courteously we complain, the website only changes, it does not necessarily get any better. I know this business is tricky but the ROH has been spending millions on so-called professionals to get it working properly. Maybe someone on here who is friendly with a member of the board could have a wee word?


Just to add, this Forum attracts many readers, some of whom may know people who can help with this. Here are a few names who perhaps could usefully be made more aware of what has been going on. Just in case someone here knows someone:-
 

Board of Trustees

 

Chair

Sir Simon Robey

 

Zeinab Badawi

Tim Bunting

Lord Browne of Madingley

Kirsty Cooper

Sir Lloyd Dorfman CBE

Dame Vivien Duffield

Lady Heywood

Susan Hoyle OBE

Julian Metherell

Paul Morrell OBE

Indhu Rubasingham MBE

Chris Townsend CBE

Roger Wright CBE

Danny Wyler

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I had problems with the new booking system at the point where you could add something to basket (donation options or click through to pay). It didn't matter which option I selected, nothing happened at all, so I edited the url which took me back to the old system to check out which was a smooth process.

I did email the Friends team and the Box Office to let them know about the glitch but no idea if it is or isn't working now.

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Have we established that the ROH isn't doing the development (as opposed to design) work in-house? I've seen a couple of things on this thread which seem to pre-suppose that new development (rather than work on legacy systems) has been contracted out, but I'm not at all sure that this is the case - and this job advert seems to imply the opposite, though it might be that they are using a mixture.

 

I would argue that doing it this way is a mistake: one benefit of using a reputable development house is that - as long as the scope is correct! - they can be held to correcting things that are wrong at their own expense. It may look cheaper to employ your own full-time development team but it is very often a false economy.

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What can you do about the woeful state of the ROH's website? Well you could message Mr Beard himself on his Twitter account and tell him how poor the website is when you try to use it to buy tickets. Let him know how frustrating it is to use it and how much easier it is to buy tickets for performances in Tashkent than to buy tickets for performances at Covent Garden because I suspect it won't change until the man at the top is told about these defects repeatedly. I have to say I find it really difficult to believe that the system was designed by anyone with any real knowledge or understanding of the Opera House's basic function as a theatre or the actual needs of its ticket  buying audience,and that is almost certainly attributable to the client organisation's lack of knowledge of such basic matters. I believe that those in charge of sales "know" that most of their ticket sales are made to people who only buy tickets occasionally rather than habitual audience members who make multiple ticket purchases in one go. I have been  told as much in the past by people working there. At the same time I was also told with absolute certainty that no one goes to multiple performances of a ballet and no one goes to opera and ballet performances. Of course I can'r know for sure but perhaps this "knowledge" fed into the specifications which were set when the contract for the new computer system was being negotiated, but it might go a long way to explain why the website is so poor in operation and layout. Perhaps the idea that the bulk of its audience at every performance is there for a special  event of some sort explains why  the organisation is so keen to publicise the availability of onsite catering.

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I have indeed emailed Alex Beard. I too feel very sorry for the box office staff trying to run a system that isn't fit for purpose and having to deal with all the flack.

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(As I am not sure which of the two parallel threads on this subject is the right one, here is what I just posted elsewhere)

 

I complained to the Friends office. They have just written to me and a couple of the points they make might be worth sharing here:

 

>>Our web team have been redeveloping the website over the course of the last year to make it more user friendly and efficient for booking tickets. This work is being carried out in stages and after a lot of testing, we have recently launched a new ticketing platform which was rolled out for the Spring booking period. Unfortunately, as you are all too aware, a number of issues have arisen and the booking experience did not go quite as planned. 

 

and

 

>>We have held meetings with our IT and web team to ascertain the problems and find the solutions. We have also escalated the issue to Alex and the executive team and solutions are being discussed at the highest level.  

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3 hours ago, FLOSS said:

I believe that those in charge of sales "know" that most of their ticket sales are made to people who only buy tickets occasionally rather than habitual audience members who make multiple ticket purchases in one go. I have been  told as much in the past by people working there. At the same time I was also told with absolute certainty that no one goes to multiple performances of a ballet and no one goes to opera and ballet performances. Of course I can'r know for sure but perhaps this "knowledge" fed into the specifications which were set when the contract for the new computer system was being negotiated, but it might go a long way to explain why the website is so poor in operation and layout. 

 

I found your comment really interesting as I participated in a marketing & ticketing feedback review a few years ago (the other attendees were all operagoers). I discovered I was an outlier in that I attend both opera & ballet & go to multiple casts of ballets (I had to explain to the market researcher why that was & she seemed genuinely surprised). I buy tickets across price ranges depending on show & cast & I was surprised at her lack of awareness given she had professed to be a ballet lover at the start of the session (I summised she attended twice a year- once for Nutcracker & maybe a Swan Lake(!) My feeling is that there is very little inhouse appreciation for the nuance of the artforms they're trying to sell tickets for & that given the ticket price increases in the last few years that is how the system is designed for infrequent attendance but paying more per head per ticket instead of encouraging regular punters at a reasonable cost. After the session I terminated my Friends membership & now only buy less than a week in advance; I disliked the 'old' ticket website as it felt clunky & didn't encourage browsing, but having just experienced the 'new' one I agree the Box Office staff will really be earning their money over the next few days. Rant over. Sorry!

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4 hours ago, FLOSS said:

I believe that those in charge of sales "know" that most of their ticket sales are made to people who only buy tickets occasionally rather than habitual audience members who make multiple ticket purchases in one go. I have been  told as much in the past by people working there.

 

Well, didn't they - pre-Covid - come up with something like 43% of customers being first-timers?  May look excellent to the Arts Council, but really the underlying implication is that there's inadequate customer retention (if indeed the term exists - I'm not exactly familiar with this stuff), especially bearing in mind that they also have a core audience which goes to multiple performances/productions each year.

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I find this lack of knowledge quite surprising. Many here will remember the "Ratner moment" a former high-up at the ROH had, when she gave an interview to a arts trade publication boasting about the very detailed knowledge they had of their audience and its buying patterns.*

 

When I talk to people at the people sitting next to me at the ballet they are very often seeing a number of different casts.

 

13 minutes ago, alison said:

Well, didn't they - pre-Covid - come up with something like 43% of customers being first-timers?

 

Obviously, for this purpose (as opposed to proving something to ACE) the more useful metric is what percentage of tickets sold go to first timers. They should know the difference but I begin to have my doubts.

 

*here: https://www.artsprofessional.co.uk/magazine/article/dancing-pinhead-pricing

Edited by Lizbie1
Correction - arts trade publication, not marketing; link added
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Where are they getting this information from?  

 

I think I filled in a questionnaire once via an email.  It was one of those "Thank you for visiting, how did you rate your experience" questionnaires.  There were a lot of questions about whether I bought food, visited the shop, did I arrive by public transport and so on.  I know they didn't ask me what criteria I used to book tickets, such as seat price or particular casts, or whether I attended multiple performances of the same production.  Instead they seemed more interest in my opinion on the cleanliness of the building and the helpfulness of the staff.  

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I have complained. I don’t wish to moan for the sake of it and sometimes these things happen but the fact that this is an ongoing issue from months ago (winter booking) means I’m very frustrated it hasn’t been resolved yet. 
 

if for whatever reason they couldn’t fix the website in time, and they would have known this, why not get extra staff on phone lines to be able to support with booking? I know it’s not as simple as that but at the very least emailing all friends with some sort of apology about the issues and offering some sort of explanation about why this is still happening and what they are doing to resolve it for future would be reassuring. 
 

the fact it’s happened again I do question what they’ve been doing these past months and whether they recognise how big of an issue it is? 
 

there’s clearly many members here who would probably be up for partaking in some sort of research to help them fix it and make the website better - why not use that expertise? Many people would probably be nice enough to do it for free, or a small sum of money in voucher form for the shop or % discount code probably would be appreciated. Even a free programme or ice cream on your next visit! 
 

when finances are a problem not sure they are being innovative about this and prioritising. Maybe an unfair comment but the lack of communication and acknowledgement of this is a bit odd, it’s hardly like by ignoring it they can pretend we won’t notice? 

 

This isn’t good for customer satisfaction and communication, and retaining those paying to be friends. And booking days aside I notice quite often their production pages (eg for swan lake) often don’t work and I get a technical error page so there’s clearly bigger issues with this website. 

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I suppose it won’t help to tell Alex Beard about my Tashkent booking experience taking less than 5 minutes when I tell him it’s for Sergei Polunin.
 

 Or will it?  Might catch his attention.  

Edited by FionaE
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Of course telling Mr Beard how easy it is book tickets elsewhere in the world is exactly what Alec and his complacent underlings need to hear.The whole organisation is a joke as it wallows in the reputation earned for it by the sound artistic decisions made years ago by Sir David Webster and Sir John Tooley; the opera company's music directors; the ballet company's directors and the choreographers who worked for them. But at the same time as these people made important decisions which added lustre to the resident companies' artistic reputations those in charge of the organisation never lost sight of the dirty commercial side of things. They never forgot that they needed to please the paying public and needed to sell tickets to a socially diverse audience by keeping amphitheatre prices affordable. Today those  running the Opera House behave as if they are running a temple to the lyric arts rather than a theatre which needs to sell tickets to survive,(currently it is meant to cover 80% of its costs at the box office).

 

It is quite simple the ROH is run by the sort of people who make it to the top in arts organisations today and they are people whose core skills seem to be the art of schmoozing and the ability to persuade the rich to make generous donations to the organisation for which they are working rather than hands on experience of undertaking the essential tasks in an organisation of the type they are to run.They know the right people, they have generic managerial skills rather than the specialist knowledge and skills required to run the organisation which they have been appointed to run and the very last thing they know anything about or are interested in is the commercial side of the operation such as effective publicity and selling tickets. I know that they have underlings who perform these tasks for them but their lack of personal experience in these areas has always seemed a weakness to me as it makes the manager more likely to accept assurances that all is well at face value when new systems are being introduced. The organisation's greatest weakness, it seems to me is that it is impossible to imagine someone today with the sort of background the first General Administrator Sir David Webster had, running a department store in Liverpool and running musical concerts in the city,ever being considered for the post he once occupied.

 

While we are telling the powers that be what is wrong with  their website perhaps they should be asked why they persist in listing both ballet and opera performances and other events in such a  haphazard manner in each booking period? A friend of mine once asked about the listing of events on the website and was told that the list sets out the events in the order in which they will take place thus if an event such as a Glitter Tour, whatever that is, or Dance with the Royal Ballet is the first event in a  particular booking period that event will take precedence over the first night of a run of ballet or opera performances which occurs the following evening. I don't understand why they don't take the logical approach of beginning the list with the theatrical performances occurring at the Opera House during the booking period listing all the performances in the following order, main stage performances; Linbury performances; any performances in the Clore; followed by open rehearsals; insight events; tours and miscellaneous events. I don't much care whether ballet and opera are listed separately or not.  I object to scrolling through so much dross to find what I am looking for. I can't help thinking it would be a great advance if the Royal Opera House  could bring itself to admit first that it is engaged in the theatrical business and as such it is in trade and second  being  in trade it recognises the need to adopt a more businesslike, orderly and logical approach to publicising its theatrical activities. Given the amount of money it has lost in sales  during the covid enforced closures I don't understand why it does not behave more like a real theatre by attempting to catch passing trade by displaying details of what's on and ticket availability in the new extension which is supposed to lure the public in from the piazza and prove that the organisation is open and accessible to all. Did I miss something but I assumed that all the fuss made about the building and its name deterring people from crossing its threshold let alone buying tickets meant that the new accessible area was going to be used not just to to entice people to buy refreshments but to buy tickets and attend performances? After the farce with the website I think they should keep a box office desk in the area by the stairs to sell tickets manned by people who are able both to sell tickets and to provide information about casting.

 

As far as appreciation of ballet is concerned whether it is Alec Beard talking at a meeting of the Ballet Association about his interest in ballet being kindled  by seeing Bussell in Manon or someone  engaged in market research for the ROH expressing a keen interest in the art form it never quite rings true . I think it is something do with the fact that such statements generally lack supporting detail and tend to sound more like something the speaker thinks they should say or has been advised to say. I sometimes wonder whether  in such circumstances the statements are being used as a way of establishing rapport with the group they are talking to and are in effect no more than a psychological  trick intended to improve communications a bit like mirroring is supposed to do. The circumstances in which such information is imparted differ widely Mr Beard's generally wants to persuade  his audience that his decisions however unpalatable they may appear are those of a fellow balletomane while the market researcher merely wants to put her group at ease and reassure them in order to get their full assistance. 

 

 

 

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10 minutes ago, FLOSS said:

A friend of mine once asked about the listing of events on the website and was told that the list sets out the events in the order in which they will take place

 

I thought that was how the ROH website organised the What's On page but looking at it right now the start of the list runs as follows:

 

Recitals at Lunch 14 February-16 May

ROH tour 10 February-31 May

Theodora 12-16 February

Bajazet 9-12 February

Tosca 11-22 February

Romeo and Juliet 9-25 February

 

What is the logic in that listing? It's not by date, or Bajazet and R&J would be the first two. It's not by performance space. I can't work out what is determining the order.

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Email from Mr Beard to Friends...

 

Friends' On Sale  - An Apology

A personal message from Alex Beard, Chief Executive


Dear Friends of Covent Garden,

Firstly, I wanted to offer all of you my personal apologies for the issues many of you have experienced around booking in recent weeks, and specifically the issues around our website as we upgrade our systems. Indeed, your broader patience and support throughout the course of the last two years has been monumental, and we wouldn't have survived without you. You are, quite simply, what keeps the Royal Opera House going.

 

I have read your emails and letters over the last few days and wanted to explain some of the background to these issues, and what we are putting in place to avoid this kind of thing from ever happening again.

 

Our old booking system is reaching a stage where the technology underpinning it will soon become obsolete, unsupported by any global platform and therefore, essentially, unusable. That is why, over the last few months, we have been working hard to upgrade our systems on a trial basis, working towards the full rollout of a superior system later this Season. However, as many of you have experienced first-hand, this new system still needs to be honed and refined, and has inadvertently resulted in many of you receiving a totally unacceptable level of customer service. I would therefore like to assure you that any further upgrades (my emphasis) will be fully tested internally before going live to ensure this doesn't happen again.

 

The issue I know has been compounded by many of you not being able to reach members of our box office to resolve the issue. I would therefore like to reassure you that, to maintain our flexible booking options during this time, we are reinforcing resource in these teams, and have hired more staff, so we can deal with queries in a more timely fashion, particularly during peak times.

 

By way of an apology for falling short of the standards you rightly expect, I would like to offer each of you one free programme for the next show you attend here in Covent Garden during the 2022 Spring Season. Please simply show this email on your phone, as well as your membership card, to a member of our front of house team on your next visit, and you will be given a programme free of charge.

 

Thank you so much for your steadfast support of the Royal Opera House, and I look forward to welcoming you here again very soon.

With all best wishes,

Alex Beard 

Edited by oncnp
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1 minute ago, Lizbie1 said:

I think it's a good apology and a fair explanation of why they had to swap systems.

 

But not why it wasn't properly tested internally prior to be rolled out. 

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23 minutes ago, oncnp said:

 

But not why it wasn't properly tested internally prior to be rolled out. 

 

Indeed - I think Nogoat's post offers a plausible reason about that but it would have been good to see something about it in the email.

 

 

Edited by Lizbie1
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I suspect that by the time I next visit on 1st March I will have forgotten to collect my free programme, but fair play at least we have a proper response. It just begs the question why it wasn't tested properly beforehand - I am sure if they had asked Friends many of us would have been happy to help test a "dummy" system.

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I think this is as good a response as could have been given in the circumstances, and good that it's come quickly. Doesn't justify or fully explain what's happened, but at least it's a full acknowledgement that it hasn't been acceptable. I just hope the issues are sorted out very soon.

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@Dawnstarand @FLOSS

 

I agree that the website layout of What’s On is awful.   
 

From what I’ve seen of other opera houses websites.. they have the first button choice being Opera or Ballet.  ROH could have 3 … Ballet, Opera and ‘Open to All’ or some other catch all phrase for tours, Tea dances etc.  
 

There are many ways to sub-divide things, but I agree that main house performances should be first.  


My preference would be 

- main stage

- secondary stage 

- cinema & online

- rehearsals

- insights

- other 

 

 

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