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Vocational Ballet Schools in Europe at 11


Whiteduvet
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Does anyone know anything about the options for vocational ballet training in Europe from 11? 
 

There's Paris Opera, but any others which are well known? Particularly in Germany, if anyone has any experience there? My daughter is keen to start vocational training and so I'm doing a bit of research. 

 

Thanks 

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could look at YAGP scholarship/partner list  list to see the schools that offer short term scholarships/summer schools etc - plenty in europe   altho not all start at 11/year 7   and /or Prix de lausanne partner schools list is interesting and can gve an idea as to what schools offer what - just as a starting point  to wet your appetite  but a pretty big list of schools out there  other than RBS or POB or Dutch national  etc etc  X

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Does your daughter have an appitude for languages as well as dance,  because she will have to take instruction and academic classes in the native language of the school? Senior school may offer international students tuition in English, but lower school will be in the native language especially if the school is linked to the state education system. So Maths, History, Sciences, Geography etc will all be offered in whatever language, English will be English as a second language. Home education is not always allowed, nor recomended considering the demands of a full time dance course and integrating study between dance classes. You have to be extremely academic or highly motivated to be maintain such discipline at aged 11.I know because my DD had to survive unsupervised study from aged 11 and she was fluent in the language having been raised through the local primary education system.Anyway, another school to add  to the list above is the Escola de Dança de Conservatório Nacional, Lisbon but you would need to have Portuguese or be able to pick up very fast. The requirement for entry includes the passing of the 4th Year of Primary, ie an exit certificate from Primary Education with evidence of passing Portuguese and Maths. Not sure if they have ever taken a foreign year 10/11 year old not raised in PT( their year 5/ grade 1 Vaganova).  Education would be free as it is a state run school, but the residence, equipment , uniform needs paying for. Entry  is by audition in June. Lisbon is great city in which to grown up. 

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Thanks all. 

 

She doesn't speak any other language which may be an issue. We are moving to Europe as a family, and so we are interested in European ballet schools to try to keep her at least a little closer. But the language barrier may be insurmountable.

 

I'll take a look at that other thread too. Thanks. 

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I don't understand your reasons for looking to move your family to Europe for your DD's ballet at this age.  If the move is for other reasons then I would expect that you would select a country that works for your family's needs and then find a ballet school in that country. I think I am missing something here (?)

 

Most students that I know who have moved to Europe for training do so at an older age and without their families.  The difficulties you are already seeing in your research will explain why!

The European School of Ballet , Amsterdam, take students from 13 years old.  This is a great place for English speakers but naturally more expensive than Germany.

 

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On 26/04/2020 at 20:19, Whiteduvet said:

Does anyone know anything about the options for vocational ballet training in Europe from 11? 
 

There's Paris Opera, but any others which are well known? Particularly in Germany, if anyone has any experience there? My daughter is keen to start vocational training and so I'm doing a bit of research. 

 

Thanks 

Berlin State Ballet School - My DS has been there since the age of 9 and is very happy. He is now almost 16. He startet as a boarder. They take particular care of their foreogn students both pastoral care and language support. When our son wanted to go to vocational school, we also looked at Hamburg and Stutgart but didn't like the concept of school and dance being separate. Berlin is more like the vocational schools in the UK where everything is integrated into one school. http://ballettschule-berlin.de/en/

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1 hour ago, Mariska said:

Berlin State Ballet School - My DS has been there since the age of 9 and is very happy. He is now almost 16. He startet as a boarder. They take particular care of their foreogn students both pastoral care and language support. When our son wanted to go to vocational school, we also looked at Hamburg and Stutgart but didn't like the concept of school and dance being separate. Berlin is more like the vocational schools in the UK where everything is integrated into one school. http://ballettschule-berlin.de/en/

 

Hi Mariska

 

Have you got any information about the issues there have been at the Berlin state Ballet school recently? I read about it in an article an on their website it refers to this. I would be interested in getting more info about the school and whether these issues are a real problem there.

 

Many thanks

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On 28/04/2020 at 00:03, DD Driver said:

I don't understand your reasons for looking to move your family to Europe for your DD's ballet at this age.  If the move is for other reasons then I would expect that you would select a country that works for your family's needs and then find a ballet school in that country. I think I am missing something here (?)

 

 

 

I'm assuming that @Whiteduvet's family are moving to Europe in any case (presumably Germany) so they are looking for schools which would be closer to their new home.  

 

I don't personally have any experience of vocational schools in Europe.  My in-laws have lived in The Netherlands for years, and I would say the Dutch generally speak exceptionally good English, from a very young age, so a school in The Netherlands may be a slightly easier experience, but I think you would still have the language problem of classes being run in Dutch.

 

I think if it was me, and if we get back to where we were in terms of being able to travel, I would consider vocational schools in the UK.  It takes no time at all to fly from the UK to Europe.

 

If travel restrictions continue I wouldn't want my child in a different country.

 

 

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On the other hand, what a brilliant opportunity to truly learn a language and appreciate another culture.  A lot easier to do when you are young and presumably most schools offer some support, or lessons could be had out of school (and in advance of moving) to help, at least with the conversational language.  Also opening up opportunities for employment further along the way, both in dance and other professions.  

 

DS has danced in Europe since graduation.  In his current company there are 3 English speakers but they are all aware that to make progress they need to speak the national language if they want to be considered for solo/principal roles.  The other 2, who have been there a few years, are fluent - it's a powerful incentive.

 

 

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On 27/04/2020 at 18:47, Whiteduvet said:

She doesn't speak any other language which may be an issue. We are moving to Europe as a family,

Could I ask....Are you moving as a family to a specific country, to Germany for example hence interest in German schools because of work etc , or are your options open because it is a desire to move to Europe as a family?  We had a five year plan to move and restart abroad, with houses and businesses to wrap up, but in the end  we took 18 months start to finish. We haven't regretted it.

How old is your DD now? Is there time to make a start on a language? Time to try a summer school if they are on this summer?

Bear in mind mentoring within  in the school, residences,  travel between home base and the school for unaccompanied minors and accompaniment / provision to medical consultations . We had a few issues.

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Clearly your family were prepared to go the extra mile this year, Whiteduvet. 

 

Another option to consider is to stay put and look into private lessons for your DD with a top coach.  This is something that can start online and move to face--to-face when conditions permit.  There are many in the profession who might not otherwise have been available to you but now have the time and would welcome the $$.   Just a thought! 

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On 27/04/2020 at 18:47, Whiteduvet said:

She doesn't speak any other language which may be an issue. We are moving to Europe as a family, and so we are interested in European ballet schools to try to keep her at least a little closer. But the language barrier may be insurmountable.

 

Again, if you're moving to Europe presumably you will be learning the language of the country you are living in, so I'd have thought that would be a good start.  You could all learn together, which would at least be supportive :)  Probably not a great idea to increase the stress by trying to cope with 2 new languages at once, especially since I believe the optimum age for foreign language acquisition is around 5-6.

 

It should be pointed out that Xander Parish (now principal at the Mariinsky) moved to Russia 10 years ago without knowing a word of Russian, has had to pick it up as he went along, and now says he's fluent in speaking it, if not writing it.  Plus of course there are all the former refugee children who moved to the UK as teens or pre-teens and have ended up doing well in academic exams and even going to university - they all had to start somewhere, so acquiring a new language is not an insuperable problem.

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On 29/04/2020 at 21:38, meadowblythe said:

 

On the other hand, what a brilliant opportunity to truly learn a language and appreciate another culture.  A lot easier to do when you are young and presumably most schools offer some support, or lessons could be had out of school (and in advance of moving) to help, at least with the conversational language.  Also opening up opportunities for employment further along the way, both in dance and other professions.  

 

DS has danced in Europe since graduation.  In his current company there are 3 English speakers but they are all aware that to make progress they need to speak the national language if they want to be considered for solo/principal roles.  The other 2, who have been there a few years, are fluent - it's a powerful incentive.

 

 

Would you say which country your DS is in, just cos I’m curious about the language he has to learn? My DS is in Poland but far from fluent!

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He's in Bulgaria - first company plenty of ex-pats so language not a problem, current, as mentioned, want you to speak their language.  It's not essential but it is expected, if that makes sense.   He's proved quite adept at picking up speaking in other languages.  Less so written!  He was previously in Czechia and there was some overlap.  Time off for injury also, oddly, contributed - working as a KP in a London hotel, such a mix of nationalities.  

 

And he was truly awful at languages at school. 

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On 02/05/2020 at 12:16, meadowblythe said:

He's in Bulgaria - first company plenty of ex-pats so language not a problem, current, as mentioned, want you to speak their language.  It's not essential but it is expected, if that makes sense.   He's proved quite adept at picking up speaking in other languages.  Less so written!  He was previously in Czechia and there was some overlap.  Time off for injury also, oddly, contributed - working as a KP in a London hotel, such a mix of nationalities.  

 

And he was truly awful at languages at school. 

Thanks meadowblythe.  Let's hope they are all back to what they love doing very soon

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi- but late, but maybe you’re still interested. My son is 13, and currently at John Neumeier in Hamburg, now completing 2nd year. We’re very happy with the school so far. The division of school and dance we have not experienced as a problem, but we have chosen to send him to the school that has cooperated with the ballet school since inception, so are very tolerant of the dancers and their special requirements, and run German courses in the school for non- German speakers. He spent one year at the ballet school in Munich, but disliked it immensely, it was very disorganized, and they were very intolerant of non-German speakers there, including the other children (!!), so not a good option. A fair few of the teacher there were Russian, and had, shall we say, interesting teaching methods, especially the Russian male teacher we encountered. Part of the advantage in Hamburg is that a lot of staff are native English speakers, including the head of school, Mrs Delmaine, and therefore also have a less abrupt approach.
My son spoke absolutely no German when we moved over, which has impacted his grades somewhat, but he’s getting there. And that’s a child with severe ADHD, that has problems structuring his language even in his native language at the best of times. 

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Hi all

 

sorry for the delay: I didn’t get an email telling me there were more replies!

 

We’re not moving to Europe for ballet! Goodness me no: she’s only 10 and we have other children and our own jobs to think about!! My husband has a new job which requires us to move to Germany permanently so I’m simply investigating options closer to where we‘ll be living. 
 

I speak fluent German but she has very little. She’s bright and young though so will learn fast. 
 

thank you for all your ideas and suggestions. Really appreciate it: it’s such a minefield!  

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