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And the press release:

 

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English National Ballet

2020-2021 Season

ballet.org.uk

  • Tamara Rojo CBE to direct and choreograph her first ballet, Raymonda, after Marius Petipa 
  • Raymonda to receive world premiere in Manchester, before UK Tour
  • Triple bill of works by William Forsythe to be performed at Sadler’s Wells 
  • 2020 marks English National Ballet’s 70th Anniversary year  
  • 10th Anniversary of English National Ballet’s Dance for Parkinson’s programme

English National Ballet today announces plans for its 2020-2021 Season. 

Tamara Rojo CBE, Artistic Director of English National Ballet, will create a new version of the classic 19th century ballet, Raymonda, after Marius Petipa. Marking her first foray into choreography and direction, Rojo adapts the three-act production for today’s audiences, revisiting this important but rarely performed work of the ballet canon which is not, in its entirety, in any other UK dance companies’ repertoire. 

Bringing the story into the setting of the Crimean war and drawing inspiration from the groundbreaking spirit and work of the women supporting the war effort, including Florence Nightingale in this her bicentennial year, Raymonda is recast as a young woman with a calling to become a nurse. With a new narrative and developed characterisation bringing women’s voices to the fore, Rojo’s Raymonda introduces a heroine in command of her own destiny. 

Tamara Rojo CBE said: “It continues to be a part of my vision for English National Ballet to look at classics with fresh eyes, to make them relevant, find new contexts, amplify new voices and ultimately evolve the art form.  

"Raymonda is a beautiful ballet – extraordinary music, exquisite and intricate choreography – with a female lead who I felt deserved more of a voice, more agency in her own story. Working with my incredible creative team, I am setting Raymonda in a new context and adapting the narrative in order to bring something unique, relevant and inspiring to our audiences.  

"I have truly enjoyed delving into the creative process of adapting and choreographing a large-scale ballet and have been inspired by Florence Nightingale’s drive and passion.”

Rojo brings together a stellar production team for Raymonda with costume and set design by Antony McDonald, lighting design by Mark Henderson, dramaturgy by Lucinda Coxon, character dances by Vadim Sirotin, and choreology research and advice on the Sergeyev notation by Doug Fullington. Alexander Glazunov’s original score, with music arrangement by Gavin Sutherland, will be performed live by English National Ballet Philharmonic. Raymonda is a Co-Production between English National Ballet and Finnish National Ballet.  

Furthering its commitment to UK touring, the world premiere of Raymonda will take place at Manchester’s Palace Theatre (15 – 17 October) before performances at Mayflower Theatre, Southampton (21 – 24 October), Milton Keynes Theatre (28 – 31 October) and then at the London Coliseum (7 – 16 January). 

Also touring this Season is Creature by Akram Khan. A Co-Production between English National Ballet and Opera Ballet Vlaanderen, this is Khan’s second full length ballet and follows the success of Giselle, which, since it was first performed in 2016, has been seen live by over 109,000 people through tours to twelve cities, in the UK and internationally. Following the world premiere of Creature at Sadler’s Wells, London in April 2020, further performances will be given by English National Ballet at the theatre in November (11 – 14) and at the Bristol Hippodrome (18 – 21 November). 

As part of English National Ballet’s commitment to taking the best of British ballet to audiences overseas, Creaturewill receive its international premiere at Chicago’s Harris Theater in March 2021 during a tour which also sees performances of Akram Khan’s Giselle, presented by Danse Danse, at Salle Wilfrid-Pelletier, Place de Arts in Montreal. Opera Ballet Vlaanderen will go on to perform Creature in Autumn 2021. Summer 2021 will see further international touring for English National Ballet, additional information to follow in due course.

Completing English National Ballet’s Autumn-Winter Season is Nutcracker which returns to the London Coliseumfor the festive period (10 December 2020 – 3 January 2021). These performances mark English National Ballet’s 70th year of performing a Nutcracker production, with the Company having done so since 1950 when it was founded. This version, by Wayne Eagling, has been seen by over 750,000 paid audience members, with 85,000 tickets sold for performances in London and Liverpool during Christmas 2019-20. 

In 2018 English National Ballet premiered William Forsythe’s first creation for a UK ballet company in over 20 years, Playlist (Track 1, 2). April 2021 sees the Company’s relationship with the revered American choreographer continue, with a triple bill of works to be performed at Sadler’s Wells, London (15 – 24), THE FORSYTHE EVENING. The bill comprises of the UK premiere of Blake Works I, which features the music of James Blake’s album, The Colour in Anything; alongside Approximate Sonata 2016, a series of deconstructed pas de deux first performed by English National Ballet in 2018; it will also present for the first time in the UK an extended version of Playlist (Track 1, 2), Playlist (EP).

Tamara Rojo CBE said: William Forsythe is a genius of our time, a true renaissance man. It was my dream to bring him to work with English National Ballet and I am so grateful he chose to create Playlist (Track 1, 2) with us. In this triple bill, the combination of Forsythe’s unique choreographic style and joyful pop music exemplifies how ballet can be for everyone to enjoy. I’m thrilled that we are now bringing Playlist (EP) and Blake Works I to UK audiences for the first time, alongside the brilliant Approximate Sonata 2016.”

English National Ballet remains committed to developing and nurturing talent within the Company. Emerging Dancer, which returns in Spring 2021, recognises the excellence of the Company’s artists through an annual celebration that sees six finalists mentored by their peers to perform in front of a panel of eminent judges. The winner of Emerging Dancer is announced alongside the Peoples Choice award and the Corps de Ballet award, introduced to recognise the hard work and dedication of an exceptional member of the corps.

Developing the ballet audience of tomorrow, English National Ballet and English National Ballet Schools My First Ballet series takes a popular ballet title and adapts it in time and length, making it accessible to children as young as three. Since 2012, over 320,000 people have seen a ballet from the series. My First Ballet: Swan Lake will be performed on tour in the UK in Spring 2021. 

Elsewhere, English National Ballet celebrates 10 years of its flagship Engagement programme, Dance for Parkinson’s. Inspired by Company repertoire, the programme provides high quality dance classes for people living with Parkinson’s, their family, friends and carers. Since its launch in 2010, English National Ballet’s Dance for Parkinson’s has reached over 4700 people and has expanded to include five hubs across the UK. 2020 sees a collaboration with King’s College London and UCL on one of the world’s largest research studies addressing the impact and scalability of arts interventions on physical and mental health. 

English National Ballet is a National Portfolio Organisation supported by Arts Council England.
NatWest is Principal Partner of English National Ballet.

-ENDS- 

Notes to Editors: 
English National Ballet is an Associate Company of Sadler’s Wells.

Raymonda by Tamara Rojo, after Marius Petipa
A Co-Production between English National Ballet and Finnish National Ballet
Production Partner: Mayflower Theatre, Southampton
UK Production Sponsor: Cunard 


Creature by Akram Khan
A Co-Production between English National Ballet and Opera Ballet Vlaanderen (OBV)
Co-Producer: Sadler’s Wells, London   Production Partner: The Joan W. and Irving B. Harris Theater
UK Production Sponsor: Cunard 


English National Ballet’s performances of Akram Khan’s Giselle in Montreal are supported by the Beaverbrook Canadian Foundation. 

On sale information: 
Priority booking for English National Ballet’s Patrons and Friends will open for Raymonda, Creature by Akram Khan (at the Bristol Hippodrome) and Nutcracker on Monday 3 February 2020. General booking for these performances will open on Wednesday 5 February 2020 (except for Raymonda at Mayflower Theatre, Southampton, which will open on Thursday 6 February 2020). 


Tickets for the November performances of Creature by Akram Khan at Sadler’s Wells, London, will go on sale in Spring 2020.

THE FORSYTHE EVENING, My First Ballet: Swan Lake and Emerging Dancer will open for booking in Autumn 2020. 


Become a Friend today to enjoy priority booking, access to exclusive events throughout the Season, and great discounts. Sign up to our e-newsletter to find out when booking is announced.

English National Ballet’s 2020-2021 Season Listings: 

Raymonda WORLD PREMIERE
Palace Theatre, Manchester

Thursday 15 – Saturday 17 October 2020
Box Office: 0844 871 3019 or www.ballet.org.uk/raymonda


Raymonda
Mayflower Theatre, Southampton
Wednesday 21 – Saturday 24 October 2020
Box Office: 02380 711811 or www.ballet.org.uk/raymonda


Raymonda 
Milton Keynes Theatre
Wednesday 28 – Saturday 31 October 2020
Box Office: 0844 871 7652 or www.ballet.org.uk/raymonda


Creature by Akram Khan 
Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London
Wednesday 11 – Saturday 14 November 2020
Box Office: 020 7863 8000 or www.ballet.org.uk/creature 


Creature by Akram Khan
Bristol Hippodrome 

Wednesday 18 – Saturday 21 November 2020
Box Office: 0844 871 3012 or www.ballet.org.uk/creature    

Nutcracker 
London Coliseum

Thursday 10 December 2020 – Sunday 3 January 2021
Box Office: 020 7845 9300 or www.ballet.org.uk/nutcracker

Raymonda
London Coliseum 

Thursday 7 – Saturday 16 January 2021
Box Office: 020 7845 9300 or www.ballet.org.uk/raymonda


Akram Khan’s Giselle
Salle Wilfrid-Pelletier, Place de Arts, Montreal, Canada

Wednesday 10 – Saturday 13 March 2021
Box Office: 514 842-2112 or www.ballet.org.uk/giselle


Creature by Akram Khan INTERNATIONAL PREMIERE
Harris Theater, Chicago, USA 

Thursday 18 – Saturday 20 March 2021
Box Office: 312.334.7777 or www.ballet.org.uk/creature      

THE FORSYTHE EVENING
Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London

Thursday 15 – Saturday 24 April 2021
Box Office: 020 7863 8000 or www.ballet.org.uk/forsythe

My First Ballet: Swan Lake
The Peacock, London plus UK Tour 

Further information to follow

Emerging Dancer 
Further information to follow
           
Performance details are subject to change. Please see www.ballet.org.uk for latest information. 

About English National Ballet 
English National Ballet has a long and distinguished history. Founded in 1950 as London Festival Ballet by the great English Dancers Alicia Markova and Anton Dolin, it has been at the forefront of ballet’s growth and evolution ever since.

English National Ballet brings world class ballet to the widest possible audience through performances across the UK and on eminent international stages including The Bolshoi Theatre and Palais Garnier; its distinguished orchestra, English National Ballet Philharmonic; and being a UK leader in creative learning and engagement practice, building innovative partnerships to deliver flagship programmes such as English National Ballet’s Dance for Parkinson’s.

Under the artistic directorship of Tamara Rojo CBE, English National Ballet has introduced ground-breaking new works to the Company’s repertoire whilst continuing to honour the tradition of great classical ballet, gaining acclaim for artistic excellence and creativity. 2019 saw English National Ballet enter a new chapter in its history with a move into a purpose-built state-of-the-art home in East London which brings a renewed commitment to, and freedom for, creativity, ambition, and connection to more people, near and far, than ever before. www.ballet.org.uk


About Arts Council England
Arts Council England is the national development body for arts and culture across England, working to enrich people’s lives. We support a range of activities across the arts, museums and libraries – from theatre to visual art, reading to dance, music to literature, and crafts to collections. Great art and culture inspires us, brings us together and teaches us about ourselves and the world around us. In short, it makes life better. Between 2018 and 2022, we will invest £1.45 billion of public money from government and an estimated £860 million from the National Lottery to help create these experiences for as many people as possible across the country.www.artscouncil.org.uk   

About NatWest, Principal Partner of English National Ballet

NatWest serves customers in England and Wales, supporting them with their personal, private, and business banking needs. NatWest helps customers at all stages in their lives, from opening student accounts, to buying their first home, setting up a business, and saving for retirement.

Alongside a wide range of banking services, NatWest offers businesses specialist sector knowledge in areas such as manufacturing and technology, as well as access to specialist entrepreneurial support. 

About Cunard
Cunard is a luxury British cruise line, renowned for creating unforgettable experiences around the world. Cunard has been a leading operator of passenger ships on the North Atlantic, since 1840, celebrating an incredible 175 years of operation in 2015. A pioneer in transatlantic journeys for generations, Cunard is world class. The Cunard experience is built on fine dining, hand-selected entertainment and outstanding service. From five-star restaurants and in-suite dining to inspiring guest speakers, the library and film screenings, every detail has been meticulously crafted to make the experience unforgettable. There are currently three Cunard ships, Queen Mary 2, Queen Elizabeth and Queen Victoria with destinations including Europe, the Caribbean, the Far East and Australia. In 2017, Cunard announced plans to add a fourth ship to its fleet that will be launched in 2022.  This investment is part of the company’s ambitious plans for the future of Cunard globally and will be the first time since 2000 that Cunard will have four ships in simultaneous service. Cunard is based at Carnival House in Southampton and has been owned by Carnival Corporation since 1998. 

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Suffice to say that I am very disappointed the company are not coming to Liverpool in the 20/21 season.

 

(Even The Nutcracker again would have been preferable to no visit at all.)

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Very intrigued by the Raymonda 're-imagining'. As long as the score is not messed with, I'm in! 

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Very excited by this - 2 new productions in a single year! Also, despite living in London, I think it's the right decision to launch new productions in other parts of the country - specifically excited that Raymonda will premiere in Manchester, my former home. This is likely high on the Arts Council agenda but probably also plays into all of the bigger political conversations around not being so London centric. This is the sort of thing that makes me really want to support ENB.

Interested to see Rojo's take on Raymonda. It's a good choice - as she says, not fully in the repertoire of any company in the UK, but intrigued to see how the new story will fit and if we will retain the Hungarian stylised Act 3. 

Particularly looking forward to the Forsythe evening - can't wait to see Playlist in full and share this with some of his other works. Unfortunately feels like a very, very long wait until April 2021 and seems more like advanced notice for next season if Creature is part of this year's season.

Shame Janet about Liverpool, but at least Manchester is close by.

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2 hours ago, Blossom said:

Very excited by this - 2 new productions in a single year! Also, despite living in London, I think it's the right decision to launch new productions in other parts of the country - specifically excited that Raymonda will premiere in Manchester, my former home. This is likely high on the Arts Council agenda but probably also plays into all of the bigger political conversations around not being so London centric. This is the sort of thing that makes me really want to support ENB.

Interested to see Rojo's take on Raymonda. It's a good choice - as she says, not fully in the repertoire of any company in the UK, but intrigued to see how the new story will fit and if we will retain the Hungarian stylised Act 3. 

Particularly looking forward to the Forsythe evening - can't wait to see Playlist in full and share this with some of his other works. Unfortunately feels like a very, very long wait until April 2021 and seems more like advanced notice for next season if Creature is part of this year's season.

Shame Janet about Liverpool, but at least Manchester is close by.


Getting to and from the centre of Manchester is a total nightmare and it’s a mere 80 mile round trip!

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Just now, Jan McNulty said:


Getting to and from the centre of Manchester is a total nightmare and it’s a mere 80 mile round trip!

😭😱. I remember it taking us 30 mins to get to Liverpool from my family home just 10 mins from the Manchester city centre, but a lot has changed in terms of one way systems, restrictions etc. 

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5 minutes ago, Blossom said:

😭😱. I remember it taking us 30 mins to get to Liverpool from my family home just 10 mins from the Manchester city centre, but a lot has changed in terms of one way systems, restrictions etc. 

You’re telling me!

 

The last couple of times I drove there the city centre was gridlocked.  Fortunately I was meaning friends for a meal first so I didn’t miss the start of the performance.

 

More recently I’ve parked up at The Lowry and got the tram but that does make the journey longer (although reduces the stress levels).

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I’m fascinated to see what Rojo will do with the Raymonda story line! Looks like a complete re write! 
Playlist is one of the ballets I wanted ‘revived’ so will be happy with that programme. 

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A touch of the Cathy Marstons, if I may say so - the emphasis on a significant female character, and a twist on a familiar ballet tale.  Cathy started in Bern with a production of Firebird, set in the early 20th century Romanov court and with Rasputin as the Firebird.

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Well the Palace theatre suits me very well. Can get the train direct and it's only just across the road from the station. Just hope the return trains are OK. 

Tamara's take on Raymonda sounds intriguing. If ever there was a ballet story that could benefit from a sympathetic reconstruction I think it's Raymonda. Even by ballet standards it always seemed a particular non story with endless variations. The only interesting character being the villain! Looking forward to it and as a proud northerner thrilled it's being premiered here, hopefully with Alina on opening night. 

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Just now, jmhopton said:

Well the Palace theatre suits me very well. Can get the train direct and it's only just across the road from the station. Just hope the return trains are OK. 

Tamara's take on Raymonda sounds intriguing. If ever there was a ballet story that could benefit from a sympathetic reconstruction I think it's Raymonda. Even by ballet standards it always seemed a particular non story with endless variations. The only interesting character being the villain! Looking forward to it and as a proud northerner thrilled it's being premiered here, hopefully with Alina on opening night. 

 

The return trains being the potential issue!

 

And let us not forget that Akram Khan's Giselle premiered at the Palace Theatre too.  (But how I wish they would go to The Lowry - a much better venue.)

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It’s a bit like that in Brighton .. the Visiting ballet companies....not that many...usually go to the Royal ...a lovely old theatre .. but for ballet the Dome is much better really. 

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This is fantastic news from ENB. As others have said I think it's great Rojo continues to invest in new work - Creature, Raymonda, and the Forsythe bill shows a good mix of contemporary 'full length', classical, and shorter pieces. (Although unclear if Rojo's Raymonda will remain as a 'classical' work!) I agree the music for Raymonda should not be tinkered with too much. And pleased to see a focus on the regions too. 

 

Part of me wonders if Raymonda will be a farewell performance for Rojo herself...which would be rather bittersweet but could emphasise this 'next' stage moving in choreography similar to Acosta. But I'd love her to continue dancing for many years to come! Has Rojo done any choreography before?

 

I do think it's a bit of a shame that they're not bringing a revival in the strict sense to London in the Autumn and are just performing Creature again, but appreciate it is a big undertaking (both for the company and financially) to do new works so it does make sense. It just means that I probably won't be seeing any ENB for the latter half of 2020 which feels like a big gap! 

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While the idea of setting a ballet around the Crimean War and the nursing staff sounds intriguing, I am really struggling to see how that fits in with the original music score!  This is not a reworking, this is a completely new ballet, surely?  With a leading role featuring a woman who happens to have a rather unusual name.  In real life, I expect she would have insisted on being called Rosemary. 

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13 minutes ago, Fonty said:

While the idea of setting a ballet around the Crimean War and the nursing staff sounds intriguing, I am really struggling to see how that fits in with the original music score!  This is not a reworking, this is a completely new ballet, surely?  With a leading role featuring a woman who happens to have a rather unusual name.  In real life, I expect she would have insisted on being called Rosemary. 

 

?? Florence isn't (or wasn't) that unusual surely? (It was my mother's second name (and she became a nurse!)). I don't know Raymonda sufficiently to judge how this might work, but it does sound intriguing.

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7 minutes ago, bridiem said:

 

?? Florence isn't (or wasn't) that unusual surely? (It was my mother's second name (and she became a nurse!)). I don't know Raymonda sufficiently to judge how this might work, but it does sound intriguing.

 

Florence isn't, no.  But Raymonda surely would be.

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The thing is with Raymonda I think is that if you listen to the whole score for the ballet it does have that ‘Hungarian’ feel about it. 
Im not sure it would suit the themes Rojo seems  to be going to explore. 
But she has called it Raymonda and not given the ballet an entirely new name ...which is why I am intrigued!! 🤔

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53 minutes ago, Fonty said:

 

Florence isn't, no.  But Raymonda surely would be.

 

Oh, I get it! 😊

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Even if there is an underlying love theme and there is a ‘marriage’ after the ‘war’ is over I can’t see that wonderful solo in the final Act which Raymonda performs in the original fitting in with  everything so I’m assuming it will be reworked quite a lot!! 
Oh well just have to wait and see .... can see me being back at the Mayflower in Southampton sooner than expected after this weekend. 

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To be honest this sounds like a new ballet using Glazunov’s music, not Raymonda.

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47 minutes ago, Shade said:

To be honest this sounds like a new ballet using Glazunov’s music, not Raymonda.

 

But re-choreographing the whole ballet will be a huge ask for a relative newcomer to making dance. So my guess is that some of the Raymonda we know will be still be there. After all even Nureyev didn't really change it all when he mounted the ballet with POB.

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Mind you it’s a while since I’ve listened to the whole score probably the right time to have another listen ....maybe I’m missing something here! 
when I first saw Raymonda... I’m sure with Nureyev and Merle Park ....I fell in love with the music and was living in Acton at the time and discovered a very good library there where I got out the whole box set of LP’s for Raymonda 

Im sure the poor old neighbours there were heartily sick of Raymonda as I played it non stop for a few months ( before getting into Romanian folk music which probably brought on murderous thoughts for some) I am a lot more thoughtful these days! 

I wonder if the whole ballet is somewhere on YouTube I will have a search and kill two birds with one stone ( sorry about the imagery can’t think of another way of saying this) 

 

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3 hours ago, bridiem said:

 

?? Florence isn't (or wasn't) that unusual surely? (It was my mother's second name (and she became a nurse!)). I don't know Raymonda sufficiently to judge how this might work, but it does sound intriguing.

In the mid-19th century Florence was an unusual name. Your mother was almost certainly named that because the name became popular due to the nurse. Here's the history from the Oxford Dictionary of First Names:

Medieval form of the Latin masculine name Florentius (a derivative of florens ‘blossoming, flourishing’) and its feminine form Florentia. In the Middle Ages the name was commonly borne by men (as, for example, the historian Florence of Worcester), but it is now exclusively a girl's name. This was revived in the second half of the 19th century, being given in honour of Florence Nightingale (1820–1910), the founder of modern nursing, who organized a group of nurses to serve in the Crimean War. She herself received the name because she was born in the Italian city of Florence

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The clue is where it states that the Raymonda choreography will be "after Petipa".  This generally means that a lot of the original will be used with additions and reworkings by the new choreographer, in this case Tamara Rojo.

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I am fascinated by the plan to set Raymonda during the Crimean War.  A couple of years ago, I spent an absorbing holiday on the Crimean Peninsula, which is literally dripping with history, although the Russian authorities are more interested in the summer palace of Nicholas and Alexandra, the Second World War siege of Sebastopol and subsequent liberation of Crimea and the detailed trappings of the Yalta Conference, not to mention Chekhov's summer dacha not far from Yalta.

 

One wonders how Abderachman and his crew will fit into a Crimean Raymonda.  The Crimean war began with skirmishes between Russia and the Ottoman Empire.  France and Britain entered the war to prevent the complete defeat of the Ottomans.  So maybe Abderachman will be an Ottoman.  During the 15th century, the Ottomans ran their slave trade in the Black Sea basin from the Crimean maritime city of Feodosia, a trade which extended far into Europe.

 

The Crimean tatars, who are also Islamic by religion, were much depleted during the Soviet period and now constitute only 12% of the Crimean population.  They play a major role in the history of the Crimean peninsula and the Khan's sixteenth century palace at Bakhchisarai is a major tourist attraction, with its well-preserved harem.  The weeping fountain, with water seeping down its stonework, inspired Pushkin to write his poem, the Fountain of Bakhchisarai (1823) and later on the Soviet ballet (1934), which contrasts the Polish and Tartar cultures and highlights the jealousies of life in the harem.  Maybe Abderachman will emerge from the Tatars.

 

The Russians massively downplay the nineteenth century Crimean war, apart from a three-D panorama of the siege of Sebastopol, opened in 1905 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the siege.  We hunted high and low for the memorial marking the Charge of the Light Brigade (1854).  Eventually a taxi driver pointed us in the right direction.  We climbed over a fence and walked up through a vineyard.  The memorial was hidden within the vines.  It was re-dedicated in 2004 by the Duke of Edinburgh and descendants of the original cavalrymen (at a time when it was Ukrainian territory) - but has since been somewhat abandoned. 

 

We detected not a single mention of Florence Nightingale anywhere in Crimea, although her statue is prominent in London, adjacent to the massive Crimean War Memorial in Waterloo Place, Pall Mall. 

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Thanks for your fascinating post Li Tai Po.

 

The Florence Nightingale Museum is in Istanbul (on the Asian side) and can only be visited by prior arrangement because, if I recall correctly, it is within a military installation.  I believe the British troops were treated in the hospital there as well as in Crimea itself.

 

In the Bolshoi synopsis Abderakhman is described as a Saracen and the story is set during the time of the Crusades (so any time between 1099 and 1300).  According to the entry in Britannica.com the term Saracen was used to describe anyone who was a Muslim in what would become the Ottoman Empire and beyond so it would actually fit in quite nicely.

 

https://www.britannica.com/topic/Saracen

 

I know it's a bit off-topic but absolutely very interesting to try and imagine how the story might be moved forward to the 19th century.

 

 

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Apparently there have been a number of revivals  over the years including Australian Ballet in 2005 in which The Ballet was set in the 1950’s ...Raymonda was a Hollywood actress.. I don’t think any link between this version and the original was claimed 🙄

However the third Act which has the Grand Pas Hongroise was because in the original the Hungarian King was involved in the victory battle with Jean de Brianne so this was a tribute to that King ...hence the Hungarian flavour. 

So in that light it will be interesting to see how this Hungarian flavour in the final Act will be introduced ....if at all of course. 

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