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CRod117

How effective are Ballet Turnout Discs?

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Hey there everyone. Ive been battling with very annoying and painful biomechanical issue with my femur. I have an internally rotated femur and assuming i produced the issue by not properly stretching and targeting the externally rotators of the hip. With that being said, with major research, I found that ballet dancers focus on turnout or femoral turnout during dance (I am not a dancer myself) but I came across the turnout discs online. I wanted to know how EFFECTIVE the turnout discs really can be and do they really help with femoral turnout? 

Any help you give will be greatly appreciated :)

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It's not something I've ever heard of, and I'd be extremely wary of using something like that without qualified professional supervision. Most ballet dancers tend to have the sort of hips where turnout is a natural facility anyway.

 

I'd suggest you speak to either a specialist dance physio or a pilates instructor familiar with dancers and dance injuries. They would be able to come up with appropriate exercises for you.

Edited by taxi4ballet
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The turn out disks are very effective in working the gluteus muscles which, when strengthened in the appropriate way, effectively ‘ hold’ the turnout of the legs in the outward position. 
Many dance based Pilates and gyrotonic teachers use them for this purpose.

I  don’t know where you’re based but if you can find a Pilates or gyrotonic teacher who has a dance background then they can supervise you in using them as it’s very important to maintain the correct posture while using them.

It will also save you buying them, as they are fairly pricey!

I can recommend a place in London and Glasgow if this is of any help.

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33 minutes ago, valentina said:

The turn out disks are very effective in working the gluteus muscles which, when strengthened in the appropriate way, effectively ‘ hold’ the turnout of the legs in the outward position. 
Many dance based Pilates and gyrotonic teachers use them for this purpose.

I  don’t know where you’re based but if you can find a Pilates or gyrotonic teacher who has a dance background then they can supervise you in using them as it’s very important to maintain the correct posture while using them.

It will also save you buying them, as they are fairly pricey!

I can recommend a place in London and Glasgow if this is of any help.

Oh it's okay I'm just trying to figure if they're any good. I NB found some on Amazon if they're not any good I'll return them to get some good ones. But I've been watching video on them. Thank you though :)

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Welcome to the forum, CRod117, and good luck with getting your problem sorted.

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On 18/01/2020 at 00:21, CRod117 said:

Hey there everyone. Ive been battling with very annoying and painful biomechanical issue with my femur. I have an internally rotated femur and assuming i produced the issue by not properly stretching and targeting the externally rotators of the hip. With that being said, with major research, I found that ballet dancers focus on turnout or femoral turnout during dance (I am not a dancer myself) but I came across the turnout discs online. I wanted to know how EFFECTIVE the turnout discs really can be and do they really help with femoral turnout? 

Any help you give will be greatly appreciated :)

 

It isn't clear what has contributed to the intial complaint, and as such, I would guard against trying to self-diagnose and therefore to self-treat.

 

Having said that, for anyone who is interested, rotating discs are very helpful for dance students to engage the deep hip rotators to externally rotate the head of the femur at the hip joint. 

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