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Buddy

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On 28/09/2019 at 17:56, Buddy said:

 

 

Whether you like ballet/dance or not, you might find this rather touching.

Oh Buddy thank you for sharing this... I was moved to cry tears of absolute joy watching the video. When bogged down as a mum with all the trials & tribulations of vocational training/auditions etc this was such a beautiful reminder of exactly what dance truly is about! 💜

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Posted (edited)

You’re very welcome and thanks for your very kind comment. It is a heart touching video that I’ve watched and will watch over and over.

 

For those here who aren’t particularly interested in the details of ballet/dance Balletco.’s “Dance Links - reviews, news & features” still might be very interesting and touching. One thing that we could look for is articles about individual dancers. These sometimes Super-stars of their profession can very often be very modest and sympathetic individuals, who perhaps are largely doing what they’re doing mainly for their love of their art. If you might want to get an insight into often very lovely and dedicated individuals this could be a place and it’s certainly meaningful for getting a sense of what might be motivating our dancing children. If I find a particularly nice article I’ll try to post it.

 

I remember an article by one dancer saying that if she didn't try to be as good a human being as possible, how could she expect the audience to believe what they were seeing when she tried to portray it during a performance.

 

 Tamara Rojo, when she became Artistic Director of the English National Ballet said in an interview that her primary concern should be for the dancers as human beings and secondly for their performances.

Edited by Buddy

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I think watching dance is a key component to training as a dancer.... it is amazing how  few performances those in training may actually get to.... would love to see schools (vocational & regular & ‘local’ dance schools) making more effort to get group trips organised to live dance/cinema screenings/workshops/events 

There’s so much going on out there.... & if course the internet does add in much more too with opportunities fir live streaming & watching historical performances too... no idea how I have time to do anything other than watch dance!! I wish... 

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The internet is by far the easiest access for dance viewing and learning. It should probably be encouraged by dance instructors. But nothing replaces a live performance.

 

Here’s one internet series that I find interesting. It has capsule descriptions by dancers of the New York City Ballet of various ballets and what’s involved in performing them. They can be found by clicking on the “nycballet” logo (then clicking on “video” at the site) on the following video. I’m sure that the Royal Ballet has similar videos.

 

This video quickly excerpts and discusses what I consider to be one of the most beautiful duets (referred to as a pas de deux (‘pah duh duhr’) in the video) in all of dance. It’s from George Balachine’ s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUH20r1DJKU

 

Here’s one more video that might be interesting to students and parents who want some insight into the professional world of dance. It’s an interview with the new directors of the New York City Ballet. If you start at 12:35 it begins with a quick discussion of the need for healthy human relations and health considerations at at a dance company.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=DABC5xU_PCg

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

As a followup to my previous post mentioning George Balanchine’s “A Midsummer Night's Dream” here’s a video of the duet that I consider to be one of the most sublimely beautiful performances that I’ve ever seen. It’s performed by Allegra Kent and Jacques d'Amboise. The video quality is not very good at all, but it’s still worth hanging in there. It’s posted by a former Balanchine star dancer whose posts have always been allowed to remain on the internet so I assume it’s okay to post here.

 

If you’re really not interested in this sort of thing or can't handle the visual quality --

 

 at least fast forward to the ending at 5:35.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7lAnKm3S-Y

Edited by Buddy

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Fans of old musicals may also remember Jacques d’Amboise as Ephraim in the film version of “Seven Brides for seven brothers”.

 

Buddy, you are correct in thinking that the Royal Ballet also has a library of videos.  I find their insight videos particularly interesting and sometimes link to the RB’s “Ballet Glossary” videos here in Doing Dance if someone has a technical question.  

As nice as it is that you are clearly keen to share your love of dance, I think we need to be a little careful not to accidentally patronise other forum members or assume that they are “uneducated” purely because they don’t post in “Performances Seen” or don’t know a particular Russian Ballerina.  🙂

Many of our Doing Dance members are busy parents, perhaps with more than one child and/or children with other extra-curricular activities.  They might pop on here with a question about finance/audition photos/shoes and then rush off again and that is what we’re here for.  It doesn’t mean they never take their child to see a live performance or that they don’t know what a pas de deux is but even if they don’t, that’s fine.   

 

Doing Dance might not cross over much or at all but it is very different to the other areas of the forum.  When my daughter was learning to swim I might have joined a parents’ forum to ask about swimsuits or lessons but I certainly wouldn’t have had the time and inclination to start learning about famous swimmers and life as a professional athlete.  If any Doing Dance regular starts reading or posting in Performances Seen or Ballet News then that’s wonderful.  But equally, I would hate anyone to think they ought to, or that only lurking/reading/posting in Doing Dance is in any way failing their child or not taking an interest.  We are here for everyone with any question. ☺️

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Anna C said:

 

 

2 hours ago, Anna C said:

 

Doing Dance might not cross over much or at all but it is very different to the other areas of the forum.  When my daughter was learning to swim I might have joined a parents’ forum to ask about swimsuits or lessons but I certainly wouldn’t have had the time and inclination to start learning about famous swimmers and life as a professional athlete.  If any Doing Dance regular starts reading or posting in Performances Seen or Ballet News then that’s wonderful.  But equally, I would hate anyone to think they ought to, or that only lurking/reading/posting in Doing Dance is in any way failing their child or not taking an interest.  We are here for everyone with any question.

 

Thanks very much for your comments, Anna C. I certainly will keep them in mind and try to give them all the consideration possible. 

 

I am a grandparent of a MT performer and I very much care about our children/grandchildren. I hope that I can learn from and share with this forum. 

 

By the way, here's something that my daughter sent me that you might enjoy. I changed it slightly.

 

A little ballet student told her instructor that she was cold.

The instructor told her to stand in the corner.

"Why,?" asked the little ballet student.

"Because it's 90 degrees," said the instructor.

Edited by Buddy

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Posted (edited)

I once mentioned that, for folks who are interested, and there do seem to be a fair number here, interviews of dancers found at Balletco.’s “Dance Links - reviews, news & features” might be a nice way to get a further glimpse into these dancers, often being very fine and interesting individuals, and the profession. DanceTabs is somewhat related to Balletco. and also has interviews.

 

The 20th century choreographer, George Balanchine, was one of the greatest. Suzanne Farrell was one of his greatest dancers. This DanceTabs interview goes back a few years, but might be of interest, as Suzanne Farrell talks about teaching and her students.

 

What qualities do you look for in your students when they audition for this program?

 

I look for their willingness to explore. The dancers always want to dance correctly, but you can be correct but be not interesting, so I want my students to find different facets of movement.….I want them to see how artists use color and texture and perspective in different ways to make paintings come alive.

 

https://dancetabs.com/2015/10/interview-suzanne-farrell-artistic-director-2/

 

Edited by Buddy

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Posted (edited)

As a quick followup to the Suzanne Farrell interview, my previous post, the George Balanchine style can be physically extreme and his classes were considered the same, very demanding on the body. Suzanne Farrell seems to accept this, even encourage it. As a parent, I personally would have to disagree with this approach. But the interview does imply that as a teacher she does have many fine qualities and ideas that could be a fine example for others.

Edited by Buddy

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Please allow me one more quick followup to good teaching ideas expressed in the Suzanne Farrell interview.

 

The author of the interview begins by saying.

 

Suzanne Farrell’s classes have a transcendent yet collaborative atmosphere.

She has a perceptive yet affectionate style of teaching.

She’s kind, respectful and reassuring.

In a way her classes are like a big experimental lab.

 

Suzanne Farrell has this to say.

 

That first of all, you should be kind.

She likes it when students are willing to explore.They shouldn’t be afraid of making mistakes. That if you don’t try, you won’t succeed.

She likes to use analogies to illustrate a lesson, rather than just making technical corrections or telling a student that she or he is wrong.

She encourages them to go beyond just dancing correctly, to be interesting as well.

That sometimes she has her students create their own dances.

She likes to take them to an art museum so that they can think creatively beyond the classroom.

She likes small size classes for individual attention.

 

And could I please add a personal point of view. Dancing should be made as healthy as possible.

 

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The first picture in the article with the girl with forced turnout, rolling feet made me wince! I must admit when a teacher says they want inventive, thinking, interesting etc dancers and you look at the classes and the pupils are all the same height, weight, build, look, is this really the most important thing they look for? Perhaps there is a large enough pool of people in the US to get all of these attributes. 

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This is from an interview with a famous Russian ballerina, now instructor, from a famous ballet family, that goes way beyond my limited knowledge of ballet history. I think that it’s a lovely quote.

 

“I think our corps de ballet [Mikhailovsky Ballet Company] is just about beginning to come into its own. The girls are so lithe, graceful, and energetic! Our girls have good form. I work hard on them, but without shouting. I go up to them, talk, and explain how I used to do it. And I feel that bit by bit I am winning them over. Being strict is all well and good, but you have to love them.”

 

https://mikhailovsky.ru/en/press/media/interview/tatiana_legat_interview/

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