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Bluebird22

Sewing help!

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That’s how I sew them too. 

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I sew them on 3 sides to the canvas (using a short hemming stitch that doesn't go all the way through to the satin but which links the ribbon and canvas every few mm), and then catch the top to the inside top of the fabric cover of the drawstring, with a second strengthening row of similar stitches parallel; to these but at the bottom of the drawstring casing. Nothing goes through the fabric to the outside of the shoe.

 

I'm also a 'chain stitcher' for the front of the shoe, completely covering the satin on the end and the linking fabric down to the sole, in continuous hoops worked in opposite directions until the two 'ends' get close enough together for a continuous tear-drop shaped spiral.

 

I was taught to sew by my mother, who learned from my grandmother, and made all my own clothes except school uniform from the age of about 10 (I was better at it than my mother, and buying ready-made was too expensive for us at that time). progressed through ballgowns at university to costumes for DD, though i do draw the line at making 'normal' clothes these days, partly becuase - as others have said - it is now cheaper to buy ready made than make your own. DD can also sew - did Textiles GCSE, has made some of her own clothes  and is much better at e.g. machine freestyle embroidery than me - but is less good at hand sewing so I do her pointe shoes.

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I had the luck to go to two schools that apart from having high academic expectations also taught us domestic science including sewing, so I have tried to pass these skills onto my youngest two daughters. The older girl did not have any instruction but went on to study Fashion Design at UWE, so if it is hand- dyed drapped silk with lots of trappings, Alexander Mc Queen style or  St. Laurent Paris catwalk stuff, she's your girl, except she is now in management on Bond Street and spend more time on the Eurostar to head office managing stock and events than designing. Unfortunately that hasn't helped with pointe shoes. practice skirts or tutu decorating..... that's all me and now the DD, whose eye for design and machine skills are improving all the time. We made four practice skirts just this week. Three for her and one for sale. We have ten more to do in our 'factory' line plus two tutus, and three neo- classical and contemporary outfits to finish in the next two weeks. We won't be putting Just Ballet out of business any time soon. It is more for learning and having Mum and DD time together. Plus we have a good source of lovely printed fabrics.

I did manage to find online a very old paper pattern for tutus of all lengths, and when I get enough time I plan to get it out. Until then I buy a plain new one and decorate. I started when I was helping out our local school and find it satisfying.  I need a proper manikin now that I can set to my DD's measurements so that when she is a 1000 miles away I can carry on working, or I only have the holidays to plan the next costumes.  

So  for those starting out, your skills and speed will improve but best of all don't get caught doing it all....Pass the skills on.  

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On 19/08/2019 at 23:04, ParentTaxi said:

I sew them on 3 sides to the canvas (using a short hemming stitch that doesn't go all the way through to the satin but which links the ribbon and canvas every few mm), and then catch the top to the inside top of the fabric cover of the drawstring, with a second strengthening row of similar stitches parallel; to these but at the bottom of the drawstring casing. Nothing goes through the fabric to the outside of the shoe.

 

I'm also a 'chain stitcher' for the front of the shoe, completely covering the satin on the end and the linking fabric down to the sole, in continuous hoops worked in opposite directions until the two 'ends' get close enough together for a continuous tear-drop shaped spiral.

 

I was taught to sew by my mother, who learned from my grandmother, and made all my own clothes except school uniform from the age of about 10 (I was better at it than my mother, and buying ready-made was too expensive for us at that time). progressed through ballgowns at university to costumes for DD, though i do draw the line at making 'normal' clothes these days, partly becuase - as others have said - it is now cheaper to buy ready made than make your own. DD can also sew - did Textiles GCSE, has made some of her own clothes  and is much better at e.g. machine freestyle embroidery than me - but is less good at hand sewing so I do her pointe shoes.

Next stop Great British sewing bee?

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On 19/08/2019 at 23:04, ParentTaxi said:

 

I'm also a 'chain stitcher' for the front of the shoe, completely covering the satin on the end and the linking fabric down to the sole, in continuous hoops worked in opposite directions until the two 'ends' get close enough together for a continuous tear-drop shaped spiral.

 

This sounds lovely - any chance of a picture? 😊

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* Next stop Great British sewing bee? *

 

Would love to - but I'm not good enough at tailoring / adapting patterns to fit....

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Aw I miss sewing dd’s shoes. I used to darn them and sewing ribbons was always straightforward but I did experiment with different darning techniques and preferred using curved needle. 

 

Unfortunately even at age 10 she was very stubborn and insisted on spending two days sewing her own ribbons on rather than let me do it in 15 min! Haha 

 

and talking of guys en pointe have you seen the Connor Mckenzie video ... wow! It was done in response to Lizzo asking for someone to do a ballet to her song as a #boysdancetoo celebration 

 

 

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