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Cluelessmomma

Brexit, EU citizenship and job opportunities

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Following a discussion on a currently hidden thread about the possible impact of Brexit on job opportunities, I was wondering if anyone has any insight, opinion or experience on the merits of dual citizenship? My dd, about to enter her graduate year, is entitled to claim Irish citizenship. This is a fairly long and not inexpensive process, but  in the current climate, especially with the delays and uncertainties surrounding Brexit, would it be worth exploring? I would be especially interested to hear from people who have been through the company audition process this year.  Thank you in advance to anyone able to comment, whether that be on here or via direct message. I understand it might be an impossible question to answer! 

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Welcome to the forum, Cluelessmomma (love the name!).

 

All I can say is that in my field (which does perhaps have closer links to the EU than many others) I get the feeling that pretty much all the Brits who are able to (which doesn't include me, sadly) are taking dual citizenship, to keep their job/domicile/pension/retirement etc. prospects as broad as possible.

 

I trust we can discuss this without it becoming overly political :) 

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Thank you Alison for your welcome and your experience. Yes, please no politics - I don’t want to cause controversy with my first post! 😉

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This is nothing specifically to do with dance, just a couple of practical tips. I haven’t “used” my dual citizenship yet, but have been through the processes of claiming Irish citizenship through the Foreign Births Register and subsequently obtaining an Irish passport. Each half of the process took a full 4 months from application to issue of the document - and for the duration of the passport application process I was without my British passport as it was one of the supporting documents with my application. However I understand from another forum member that one can get around this by visiting the Irish Embassy Passport Office (Cromwell Road, London SW7) in person and getting them to certify and return your supporting documents while you wait.

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Many thanks Ruth that is really very helpful advice! I wonder if ‘citizenship pending’ would be something that she could put on her applications - the criteria is pretty straightforward so no issue of being rejected but the timescale looks very tight! 

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Hi, I am in the process of doing this for my 15 year old daughter for the exact same reasons. She isn't even at upper school yet, let alone looking for a job, but I wanted her to have the security of EU membership before she applies to upper school and shuts down other career options, especially as she is keen on applying to Europe for vocational school. 

It took me 6 months to get my passport and we are currently 8 months into waiting for her nationalisation. Passport will be another 6 months so I'm glad we did this well in advance. It's long-winded and complicated and expensive - but I did keep my passport by sending in a notorised copy. It's also worth it to keep her career options open in and out of dance. Good luck!

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Not dance related from us either, but we are looking at my husband getting citizenship of his mother's country of birth, so that our children potentially could then do the same and have more options in the future. I think if there is a reasonable chance of them wanting to live and work in the EU in the future it is likely to make things a lot easier to have nationality of an EU country. 

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My DD has 3 citizenships (one includes EU) just in case, so we are hoping that they will open her the doors when applying for companies worldwide. Definetly go for it!

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We are doing the same, my husband is Irish, so my dd although born here is automatically an Irish citizen, we currently have the passports form completed just waiting to be witnessed and sent, we think this is all that is needed along with my husbands birth certificate and our marriage certificate, in this scenario for dd’s Irish passport. My dd has just finished 1st year of us, so not looking for jobs yet, but I have looked at some adverts and they say, entitled to work in the EU, I’m presuming after Brexit this won’t apply to British Citizens , but I’m not sure, presumably it will require some sort of visa, suspect this will form part of any withdrawal agreement. 

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23 minutes ago, Loulou said:

suspect this will form part of any withdrawal agreement. 

 

If it doesn’t - and it would have to be reciprocal - I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s trouble when a huge number of British citizens with dual citizenship try to take advantage of free movement. Especially in the case of a bad tempered no deal exit, which is apparently becoming government policy. 

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Many thanks to everyone for your really helpful replies - hopefully we can get stup  1 completed before the audition process gets fully underway! We really do appreciate people taking the time to share their experiences and insights - I truly am clueless and not just about ballet! 😉

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Loulou said:

entitled to work in the EU, I’m presuming after Brexit this won’t apply to British Citizens

 

I think that is very much what will be the case. If we're not EU citizens, we're not EU citizens. However, I know that in Germany, for example, they are planning to ease things as much as possible for UK citizens after Brexit. But I gather (from a family member who lives & works there) that will chiefly apply to those already resident in Germany - and Germany is probably extra-sensitive about welcoming migrants, given their 20th century history.

 

Under current UK employment law around citizenship, I'm told by my HR department when recruiting (not for a dance job, though!) that if we have two otherwise equal candidates, and one is an EU citizen and one is not, we give preference to the EU citizen (UK or non-UK EU). 

Edited by Kate_N

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