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Dancemom9
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May have the wrong section here, but what I am looking for is some advice my daughter is a dancer, but needs so,e help.

her posture needs work, leg extensions and also arches, could anyone please offer us some advice, or better still recommend a good class she could poss attend, we are based in the north of London.

i need a very go ahead teacher.

Any advice gratefully received 

thanks in advance.

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I would definitely recommend Sarah Toner in North London. She is superb at stripping things back to basics and works slowly and thoroughly. Especially good if you can afford one one/ private lessons. She is also lovely and instils confidence at the same time.

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My daughter is not in ballet, she is a multiple champion, but without the above corrections she will fall behind, I am looking to the ballet community for advice, as this is where  the skills in my opinion have been perfected most.

My daughter is 9years old,, how much would I expect to pay for private lessons, or could anyone recommend a very go ahead class.

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A multiple champion in what?

 

Ballet is often seen as the core/foundation of all dance and most serious dancers take ballet even if they specialise in other genres.  A good teacher will work on correct technique and alignment but these are not necessarily the things that win competitions.  Its slow and steady towards an end goal of excellent technique and musicality that can be sustained over a period of time.  For example it is preferred that a dancer has a lower leg but correct hip placement rather than the leg up by the ears which looks good.

 

I'm a lot further North but we paid around £30 an hour for private lessons for my daughter (plus the cost of studio hire) who was in a vocational school.  For my son who is a recreational dancer but a late starter I pay £20 per hourat his usual dance school.  But I would advise trying to find at least a weekly or twice weekly ballet class if possible.

Edited by Picturesinthefirelight
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23 minutes ago, Picturesinthefirelight said:

A multiple champion in what?

 

Ballet is often seen as the core/foundation of all dance and most serious dancers take ballet even if they specialise in other genres.  A good teacher will work on correct technique and alignment but these are not necessarily the things that win competitions.  Its slow and steady towards an end goal of excellent technique and musicality that can be sustained over a period of time.  For example it is preferred that a dancer has a lower leg but correct hip placement rather than the leg up by the ears which looks good.

 

I'm a lot further North but we paid around £30 an hour for private lessons for my daughter (plus the cost of studio hire) who was in a vocational school.  For my son who is a recreational dancer but a late starter I pay £20 per hourat his usual dance school.  But I would advise trying to find at least a weekly or twice weekly ballet class if possible.

You would expect to pay at least double this in London for an hour of expert tuition.

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My daughter, who is now dances professionally, attended (and very much enjoyed) Debra Bradnum's Ballettrain School from 5 to 11. 

 

She has a comprehensive website and you can get all the information you need from that.

 

Good luck 

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It might be sensible to do the exercises your daughter’s teacher advises following her assessment of her level and ability. 

 

To start exercises without advice and assessment might be more harmful than beneficial. 

 

Choose a school, take your daughter in, and see what they advise.

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The received wisdom about ballet training at a young age is that it is far better for a child to be in a group class. There are all sorts of advantages:

  • learning from others
  • learning how to learn with others
  • hearing teacher's corrections for others and applying them
  • learning spatial awareness in a group
  • learning consideration for others
  • learning how to dance with other people (a dance career is rarely just solos!)

I'm sure others more experienced than I am with 9 year olds can add to this list.

 

At 9,  and just starting the formal study of ballet, your daughter would need a year of basic grounding with children aged between 7 and 9. Serious ballet learning starts at around 7 or 8, and at that age, it's simple but foundational. Not tricks, turns or high extensions, but learning to locate and use the rotator muscles to keep the turn out working (turn out is an action not a position). Learning how to activate the back and abdominal muscles to develop the pulled up, extended deportment and carriage of the arms (port de bras) required for ballet. Learning how to mobilise and work the ankles, feet and toes. Learning the names and actions of the basic building blocks of ballet (plié, tendu, fondu, jeté and so on). 

 

Private lessons are usually for children a little older, who need some specific coaching (after injury say, or for a piece of repertoire for a ballet competition). 

 

A couple of private ballet lessons for a child who's trained in other dance forms won't do this, and ballet isn't a quick fix. A group class once a week will start to help in the way you want it to, but ballet is ballet, not a remedial form to create "arches" or leg extensions. Those come after several years of careful, focused, slow work..

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2 hours ago, Kate_N said:

The received wisdom about ballet training at a young age is that it is far better for a child to be in a group class. There are all sorts of advantages:

  • learning from others
  • learning how to learn with others
  • hearing teacher's corrections for others and applying them
  • learning spatial awareness in a group
  • learning consideration for others
  • learning how to dance with other people (a dance career is rarely just solos!)

I'm sure others more experienced than I am with 9 year olds can add to this list.

 

At 9,  and just starting the formal study of ballet, your daughter would need a year of basic grounding with children aged between 7 and 9. Serious ballet learning starts at around 7 or 8, and at that age, it's simple but foundational. Not tricks, turns or high extensions, but learning to locate and use the rotator muscles to keep the turn out working (turn out is an action not a position). Learning how to activate the back and abdominal muscles to develop the pulled up, extended deportment and carriage of the arms (port de bras) required for ballet. Learning how to mobilise and work the ankles, feet and toes. Learning the names and actions of the basic building blocks of ballet (plié, tendu, fondu, jeté and so on). 

 

Private lessons are usually for children a little older, who need some specific coaching (after injury say, or for a piece of repertoire for a ballet competition). 

 

A couple of private ballet lessons for a child who's trained in other dance forms won't do this, and ballet isn't a quick fix. A group class once a week will start to help in the way you want it to, but ballet is ballet, not a remedial form to create "arches" or leg extensions. Those come after several years of careful, focused, slow work..

Totally agree with the above. Private lessons are valuable for those who want to improve a certain aspect of their technique. A set of 4 or 6 can allow the teacher to fully assess the student and focus in on the particular element that needs improvement, giving support and strength exercises to compliment the tuition. If your Dd has not had any ballet training, then you may be wasting your money. 

However, good posture, is universal for all dance genres, and having some basic private tuition and support exercises for this,  will not do any harm although it would be much cheaper and more fun for your Dd  to find a reputable teacher who will incorporate this naturally into a general class.

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Thank you Katie (and of course to everyone else that has spent the time to kindly reply).

what you have replied makes total sense, I am happy for her to attend a class, but my lack of knowledge of quality ballet classes, leaves me a little unsure as to which one to attend, I have seen a could of classes, but they were mainly interested in local performances, and didn't put a whole lot of focus on the basics, which is my primary concern, if anyone could please advise me of a decent class to send her too I would be interested.

looking in the north/ north-west of London would be great, 

thank you once again

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