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Being muslim at ballet


Nadya
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Hello everyone,
 
I am a young woman of 16 years old, and - I say it because it will be important for understanding the rest of my message - a practicing muslim. I wear the hijab and try to live accordingly to the precepts of my faith as much as I can.
Nevertheless, I have always found ballet being inspiring and beautiful, but I never had the opportunity to dance it myself. Now the opportunity is offered to me to start ballet lessons. Of course I don't plan to become a professional dancer, but I would still like to learn!
 
But before starting it, I still have some doubts. First, I wonder how I will be welcomed by the other dancers... It seems to me that ballet is a world with mostly white and christian girls. I know that a few great ballet dancers aren't, but most of them are... I am afraid some of my classmates might not accept my difference. From your experience, how tolerant a teen ballet class can be?
 
My other doubts are much more trivial, but still quite important to me: as a muslim, I wear hijab and always dress modestly to not show my skin (long skirts, covering tops...). I heard that girls of my age are asked to wear uniforms that look like one-piece swimsuit with tights (which is something far more revealing that what I am used to), and I don't know if my hijab would me accepted in class...
 
Thank you for your answers (it wasn't really easy for me to write down those doubts, but I hope it will help me make up my mind), and blessings on you all!
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Hello, nadya, welcome to the forum - and thanks for plucking up the courage to post.  I'm sure I won't be the most helpful person to answer, but I believe I have noticed the odd hijab-wearing young woman in ballet classes before, although I can't remember where.  You're mentioning uniforms - are you actually thinking of enrolling at a school which has them, or is this a more relaxed place?  If it's a particular school, and it does have a uniform, then I'd approach them and see what they say.  Otherwise, I think places tend to have guidelines rather than a particular uniform protocol.  For example, I do my classes in leggings and a baggy T-shirt, although you can get long-sleeved leotards, thick footless tights made of the same sort of material as the leotards, and even wraparound knee-length or calf-length skirts, if that would help.  The thing with ballet is that your teacher needs to be able to see in particular your legs sufficiently well to be able to spot if you're doing things wrong and causing a potential injury.  If you do find the uniform regulations are too strict for your tastes, I'd think you are probably old enough to join an "adult" ballet class for beginners anyway.

 

As for the tolerance of teenage girls, well, they're teenage girls, I guess.  Do you normally get problems with lack of tolerance from the ones around where you live (assuming you're doing class locally)?  I'd hope it wouldn't be much different from school, although imagine you might cause a bit of a stir at first until they get used to the idea!

 

Also, I'm assuming you'll want to make sure it is an all-female class and a female teacher - boys do do ballet as well :) 

 

 

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Also thinking, Islam (or certain branches of it) tends to look rather askance at dance in general, doesn't it?  Are your family okay with the idea, or haven't you got as far as discussing it with them yet?

 

Another thought: Googling on "hijab-wearing ballet dancers" produces some interesting hits which may or may not be of help.

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Hi hun,

Great that you’ve been given this opportunity. I think dance should be available to everyone.

As regards uniform I’d ask the class teacher, some schools have very set ideas about leotards and tights but yours might be more flexible. Obviously the teacher has to be able to see the shapes you are making with your limbs so she can give you corrections.

I’d just check with the teacher about boys. My DS is the only boy in his class of 11+12 year olds, but still maybe your parents wouldn’t be happy with boys in the class?

Hope you can figure something out, you’ll love it! 👍👍👍👍👍

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I think if you turned up at our school - which doesn't really have a class at your age group for various reasons - you'd probably be directed towards the adult class, where the uniform wouldn't be an issue.

 

Talk to the teacher, is, as very often, the only useful advice here.

 

Hijab + reasonably closely fitting leggings/top with a mid-thigh to knee length skirt should be ok, though I have no idea how you'll survive a hard class in that without melting! As Alison says, searches throw up images of covered dancers and this coverage in particular:
 

https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/worlds-first-hijabi-ballerina-is-forging-a-path-fo/

 

and this lady:

 

https://www.instagram.com/engyelshazlyy/?hl=en

 

 

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Hello Nadya,

 

first of all I think it is great that you are thinking about ballet lessons - it is a wonderful thing, especially if you already like it from the "outside"!

 

Regarding the tolerance by teenage girls: well, I don´t think it is something which you can generalize. I am sure there are teenagers who are very open minded and then there will be teenagers who are maybe more intolerant. It is probably like at your normal school or at different clubs or associations you are visting. It is true that there are a lot of white girls (though not necessarily christian) out there in the ballet world, but I think also a ballet school reflects the area where you live. As an example I - occasionally - teach or have workshops at a school, which lies in an area, where a lot of different ethnicities are living. There are still a lot of white girls/women at this school, but also a lot of other people from all over the world, from Asia (South Korea, India, Phillipines), Caribean, Africa and also some from Egypt, Turkey and the Lebanese republic. It is a wonderful mix and since there are clashing so many cultures there is also a lot of open mindedness. The three girls/women from the last countries are also all Muslims (though they practice their faith differently strict). So maybe you wouldn´t be necessarily the first muslim girl at your school!

 

Regarding the clothing issue: like Alison already wrote, it is unfortunately important to see some lines so the teacher can see if you use the right muscles and technique. I had a friend at my balletgroup before my vocational school who started to dress up more and more in the ballet classes. At the end it was really difficult to see the body, it was all very "baggy" and very wide and the teacher couldn´t see anymore if she was doing something wrong.

But one of the women I was talking about is a good example for you (the other 2 aren´t as strict as the third one, they do not wear any hijabs and wear - long- sleeved and legged clothes, but very tight, so probably not comfortable for you). The young woman I mean wears above her (long sleeve) leotard a loose fitting shirt and has always a short and a skirt, which ends shortly above her knee. It covers her breasts and hips/bottom/lower belly more but the teachers still can see  lines and muscles. When she started ballett she actually wore a burkini and now her clothes have the same fitting. She wears during class not a classical hijab but a turban hijab so she has more free movement (meaning you can see her neck because the "scarf" is missing) - I am not sure if this is something for you or if this to open. Also I apologize if I use the wrong terminology.

 

Remember that you maybe need an extra layer for the way to/back from the dressing room/Studio, because even when your class is only women/girls (something to consider: not every ballet school has class only for the female gender) there might be partners/fathers/boyfriends from the other students waiting for them in the corridors.

 

 

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Hello everyone,
 
That's a lot of answers, thank you everyone for your feedback!
 
As I don't live in a very big city, I don't have a lot of choice concerning the school where I can take ballet classes. Fortunately, there is a "beginner teen/preteen" class where I can go (the adult class doesn't match with my planning, sadly), but from what I've heard, they require "the traditionnal ballet uniform". I guess that means bodysuit and tights?
I understand the part about the teachers being able to see the lines and correct the positions, but I think there is an in-between from baggy clothing to being nearly naked (which is how I see some dance outfits). The most important to me is to be modest and preserve my decency: I don't want to show my skin or inordinately reveal my body.
 
Of course I plan to go to a class with only women! Those classes seem to be the norm around here... The boys tend to not be very interested into dancing and consider that it's a "girl thing". And I will make sure to cover myself between the dressing room and the studio! But I would be even more comfortable knowing that my ballet attire might not be considered improper if I met any partner/father/boyfriend of the other girls...
 
Concerning tolerance, I have been confronted to insults or remarks about my ethnicity or religion. It is rare, fortunately, as most of my friends are also muslim or at least have known muslim people for a long time. But these people I know best don't practice ballet, so it will be a new world for me when I will enter the dance studio...
 
5 hours ago, Colman said:

Hijab + reasonably closely fitting leggings/top with a mid-thigh to knee length skirt should be ok, though I have no idea how you'll survive a hard class in that without melting! As Alison says, searches throw up images of covered dancers and this coverage in particular:
 

https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/worlds-first-hijabi-ballerina-is-forging-a-path-fo/

 

and this lady:

 

https://www.instagram.com/engyelshazlyy/?hl=en

 

 

 

Thank you for making me discover the "hijabi ballerina", Stephanie Kurlow! She is truely inspiring. And it makes me very happy to see that a ballerina wearing hijab can be successful despite the bias and discriminations that still exist... She also seems very confident in herself, much more than I am! I like most of her outfits and how she styles her headscarf with it, even if I would not feel comfortable showing my legs as much as she sometimes does 😅
 
2 hours ago, alison said:

It occurs to me to wonder what you've been doing for P.E. at school (they haven't eliminated that from the curriculum yet, have they?!), and whether this will be vastly different?

 

I have done athletics, badminton, table tennis, and a few other things... All of them are sports that I can practice in a comfortable tracksuit. Those sports are about physical performance but don't require you to expose your body.

 

16 hours ago, alison said:

Also thinking, Islam (or certain branches of it) tends to look rather askance at dance in general, doesn't it?  Are your family okay with the idea, or haven't you got as far as discussing it with them yet?

 

I have discussed it with my family - I wouldn't dare to do this if I didn't have their approval! - and also with my imam. He told me that some traditionalists consider that music and dance are haram (which means "forbidden" in Islam), but those traditionalists are the kind of people that say everything is haram even when the Curan says otherwise. Dance is halal (allowed) as long as it is done with moderation and modesty, not to provoke desire in men, and that it doesn't divert you from your faith. Hence my concerns.

 

Finally, thanks a lot @Esmeralda for all your advices and kind words! It was interesting to read how the different women you knew adapted... A burkini might be an option for me, but I doubt it could be considered a "traditionnal ballet uniform". And don't apologize about the terminology, your whole message was very clear, and it's really nice of you to try to understand my problems as you do :)

 

Blessings on you all.

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Nadya, I wish you all the best! Speak with the ballet teacher and explain her your problems, maybe she understands you better as you think at the moment! If she is not open minded and can´t help you - I know you will be sad, but don´t give up! Maybe there will be another opportunity, maybe now isn´t the perfect moment for you, but I am sure that someday you can and will do this! Amel, the woman I was talking about in my post, wanted to dance ballet since she was four years old, but she did have to wait for this chance until she was 25 years old. She is always super motivated and has so much fun and it is fantastic to see her progress. Good luck and please tell us, how it worked out!

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The reason that ballet clothing is so tight-fitting is that the teacher will need to see your posture closely in order to explain to you how to adjust your positioning, so that you can learn to do the exercises correctly. There is no cultural-specific reason. The teacher can see your placement and which muscle groups you are using. I'm sure that a long slim-fitting black t-shirt and black leggings would enable them to do that. My dd had a school friend who was muslim and she did GCSE dance wearing those. I'm sure any dance teacher would be happy to accommodate your requirements re uniform.

 

Best of luck :)

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You bring up a topic that has long been a bug bear of mine whenever anyone talks about increasing diversity in the performing arts. 

 

Having seen friends of my daughter have to give up ballet past the age of 7/8 and having noticed that despite living in an area with a significant population of people of Pakistani/Bangladeshi origin when I look at local dance schools and youth theatre companies none of these girls are represented. 

 

Other minority groups are talked about, initiatives put in place etc but in the general conversation on increasing BAME participation no-one seems to want to address this fundamental issue that traditional ballet uniform and perception of it prevents participation of Muslim girls past puberty & if adaptations to the uniform were made It would open the door for wider participation.  

 

 

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Incidentally, the Royal Academy of Dance - which I think is the biggest examining body - uniform rules say:

 

“Candidates may wear a headscarf or hijab, provided that this does not obscure the line of the head and neck, and may wear long-sleeved leotards, provided this does not obscure the line of the arm.” 

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, alison said:

It occurs to me to wonder what you've been doing for P.E. at school (they haven't eliminated that from the curriculum yet, have they?!), and whether this will be vastly different?

most  current PE  dress codes  allow  baggy kit  and/or base layers to cover arms  etc ... 

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3 hours ago, Picturesinthefirelight said:

You bring up a topic that has long been a bug bear of mine whenever anyone talks about increasing diversity in the performing arts. 

 

Having seen friends of my daughter have to give up ballet past the age of 7/8 and having noticed that despite living in an area with a significant population of people of Pakistani/Bangladeshi origin when I look at local dance schools and youth theatre companies none of these girls are represented. 

 

Other minority groups are talked about, initiatives put in place etc but in the general conversation on increasing BAME participation no-one seems to want to address this fundamental issue that traditional ballet uniform and perception of it prevents participation of Muslim girls past puberty & if adaptations to the uniform were made It would open the door for wider participation.  

 

 

I think colman is right that this is wrthy of topic in it;s own right 

 however when it comes ot  certai nSouth asian communities there;s a  load of stuff to unpack over participation  ( we've seen a lot of it in relation to Nursing  over  the past 20 -30 years ) 

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Hello, and welcome! It sounds like you’re really keen to try out ballet class and that’s brilliant. Any good teacher will be understanding of your concerns about uniform, and any serious ballet student will be there only to learn and progress and will have no reason to judge anyone else in class. 

Could I ask, just out of curiosity, why the traditional ballet uniform is considered to be inappropriate? 

I’m not a ‘usual’ ballet student either - I started as an adult and I’m also overweight. But I haven’t let that stop me and I’m making good progress so far. I love it so I have persevered and made it work. 

I hope you enjoy your classes when you start 😊

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I think a compromise definitely can and should be reached. If the teacher is accredited with any of the major organisations then they should be following their equality policies. However be prepared they may not have considered this issue before. The big issue will be attitudes of other students. Is the class going to be full of people who are used to going to school with and working with Muslim girls who won’t bat an eyelid or are you going to be gawped at?  If the latter then it’s a great opportunity to educate your fellow classmates but that will take confidence and resilience at the same time as you are trying something new. 

 

I really hope it goes well for you. 

Edited by Picturesinthefirelight
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My experience of the teenagers I teach is that they will ask questions as an adult I would be cautious about asking. I teach someone with a prosthetic limb which I know seems completely irrelevant to your question but myself and other teachers initially tried to make as little fuss as possible but my other students sat and asked her lots of questions and ultimately we all left feeling considerably more educated! It may be unusual for you to wear a different uniform at first and the other girls may ask questions but take that as an opportunity to educate others and engage in an open discussion. More often than not issues arise where there is a lack of education. 

There are dance wear shops that sell catsuits/unitards with long sleeves, legs and a high turtle neck, I would consider that plus maybe a mesh overlays dress like what Bloch sell or a wrap over skirt, a perfectly acceptable uniform. There are lots of beautiful wrap skirts available and I am sure some of the independent skirt makers would also be able to create a matching hijab so that it did truly feel like your uniform for dance class. 

 

Good luck! 

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Bluebird22 - absolutely relevant.  I had a blind gentleman on my team for a while.  He encouraged people to talk and be open about his blindness and their queries.  One day one of his colleagues said about a situation - "It's like the blind leading the blind".  There was a horrified silence from everyone except for the blind gentleman who couldn't stop laughing and said the he often used that expression himself.

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I think we should all be far more child like in our approach to things we don’t know about or don’t understand. I have witnessed so many parents leap in and apologise for their child’s questions and then scold the child for being rude! As I’ve mentioned before I have virtually no voice and I speak no louder than a whisper, I include it in my introductions to new people more often than not as it eliminates them feeling awkward about asking me what’s wrong, or worse still whispering with me! 

 

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9 minutes ago, Jan McNulty said:

Bluebird22 - absolutely relevant.  I had a blind gentleman on my team for a while.  He encouraged people to talk and be open about his blindness and their queries.  One day one of his colleagues said about a situation - "It's like the blind leading the blind".  There was a horrified silence from everyone except for the blind gentleman who couldn't stop laughing and said the he often used that expression himself.

 

 having worked with  people with spinal cord injuries for a number of  years, the use of various  comments and  turns of phrase  related to such things was common ... 

topped  off   by one of those individuals who remains  a friend commenting   ' it takes balls to do that'   when i came out as trans ... 

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12 hours ago, DeveloppeD said:

Hello, and welcome! It sounds like you’re really keen to try out ballet class and that’s brilliant. Any good teacher will be understanding of your concerns about uniform, and any serious ballet student will be there only to learn and progress and will have no reason to judge anyone else in class. 

Could I ask, just out of curiosity, why the traditional ballet uniform is considered to be inappropriate?

 

It can be considered inappropriate mainly because it is extremely skin-tight and body-revealing. The key concept when you dress and are a muslim is modesty, which translates in two things :
- your body should not be displayed as an object of desire to other people, especially men, because it coult tempt them into unwanted feelings : jealousy, lust...

- you should not feed vanity or vainglory about your appearance as it would be disrespectful towards yourself, others, and Allah (Glory upon him)

 

Concretely, it is considered decent for a muslim woman to have her whole body covered in loose and non-sheer clothing, except for hands, face and feet. Hair is considered especially important and should be kept covered when outside of your family circle. I'm sure you can understand why some ballet uniforms, like this, are not considered modest: you can clearly see the shape of the body (especially the bottom) ; arms, neck and hair are on display, and the legs are only covered with a very sheer material! For me, it's not very far of being naked ^^'

 

If you want to continue this discussion in private message DeveloppeD, I would be glad to answer your questions! I am surely not an ulama (scholar of the faith), but I would be happy to help someone understand Islam better 😊

 

16 hours ago, Picturesinthefirelight said:

You bring up a topic that has long been a bug bear of mine whenever anyone talks about increasing diversity in the performing arts. 

 

Having seen friends of my daughter have to give up ballet past the age of 7/8 and having noticed that despite living in an area with a significant population of people of Pakistani/Bangladeshi origin when I look at local dance schools and youth theatre companies none of these girls are represented. 

 

Other minority groups are talked about, initiatives put in place etc but in the general conversation on increasing BAME participation no-one seems to want to address this fundamental issue that traditional ballet uniform and perception of it prevents participation of Muslim girls past puberty & if adaptations to the uniform were made It would open the door for wider participation. 

 

I totally agree with you! I know ballet is deeply rooted in Western traditions, but think a lot of those traditions make it difficult for a muslim young woman to decide to practice it, despite its beauty. Uniform is the main example of that! It will be hard for a muslim girl to hear that "the teacher must be able to see the lines of her body": what if the teacher is a man? It contradicts a lot of things she have learnt since her young age.

 

The beauty of ballet is not simply tied to clothes or a uniform, it is something that can and should be universal 😃

 

2 hours ago, Bluebird22 said:

There are dance wear shops that sell catsuits/unitards with long sleeves, legs and a high turtle neck, I would consider that plus maybe a mesh overlays dress like what Bloch sell or a wrap over skirt, a perfectly acceptable uniform. There are lots of beautiful wrap skirts available and I am sure some of the independent skirt makers would also be able to create a matching hijab so that it did truly feel like your uniform for dance class. 

 

Good luck! 

 

Yes, I think layering clothes is a good idea... A long-sleeved top with trousers, and a long skirt worn over to give it more a ballerina look. I am very inspired by this outfit of Stephanie Kurlow, do you think it could be allowed in class?

Also, I'm glad to learn that hijab is more and more accepted in uniform rules!

 

11 hours ago, Picturesinthefirelight said:

I think a compromise definitely can and should be reached. If the teacher is accredited with any of the major organisations then they should be following their equality policies. However be prepared they may not have considered this issue before. The big issue will be attitudes of other students. Is the class going to be full of people who are used to going to school with and working with Muslim girls who won’t bat an eyelid or are you going to be gawped at?  If the latter then it’s a great opportunity to educate your fellow classmates but that will take confidence and resilience at the same time as you are trying something new. 

 

I really hope it goes well for you. 

 

This is also what I think : it will be a great opportunity to promote tolerance in the class. Most of the girls there might be in the same high school as me, so it would not be the first time they meet a muslim or see a hijab, but maybe they could be suprised to find me in ballet? What I fear the most would be a reaction of "this is not made for you, go back home!". Of course I know this would not be true, but it would be harsh words to hear...

 

I thank you once again for your help! You help me answer a lot of questions. If I can also help you by answering some interogations, do not hesitate to ask!

 

Blessings on you all.

Edited by Nadya
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Nadya, I really hope you can find a way to enjoy learning ballet and feel part of a group. Thank you for drawing our attention on this forum to the issues of being a Muslim and participating in ballet. For the clothing, I imagine it is something you would both need to feel modest but also enable you to cope with the physical exertion of ballet - girls often come out of class sweating as much as if they'd run 5,000 metres! As for the attitude of other girls in class, I would trial some classes first and see where you felt most comfortable. Feeling accepted and encouraged by the others in the class will really add to your enjoyment of ballet. I wish you all the best and please let us know how you get on!

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Hello Nadya, a belated welcome to the forum from me.  

 

Your question about whether something like Stephanie Kurlow’s outfit would be permitted in class will depend upon your teacher.  It’s easily put together although wearing a leotard over the top of a turtleneck could be quite hot if the class is strenuous.  Several dancewear manufacturers make long sleeved turtleneck leotards (here’s one by Capezio):  https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B001GBIX2Y/ref=asc_df_B001GBIX2Y56984722/?tag=googshopuk-21&creative=22122&creativeASIN=B001GBIX2Y&linkCode=df0&hvadid=218046489762&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=15309735837398710782&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=t&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1007198&hvtargid=pla-372182629363 over which you could wear black leggings (Stephanie’s look a little loose at the bottom but she may be wearing legwarmers).  

 

As Bluebird says, there are lots of lovely wraparound dance skirts available.  These should really be sheer (made of chiffon or similar) for beginners but if you wear opaque leggings underneath the skirt then hopefully that will comply with the requirements of your faith.  With the turtleneck leotard you might then only have to cover your hair and the line of your neck can still be seen by the teacher (or examiner should you choose to take a ballet exam in future).

 

You will notice that we talk about “line” in ballet, as does the RAD (Royal Academy of Dance) in its uniform requirement.  “Line” simply means the positions and movements of the limbs, body and neck.  When you go to watch professional ballet dancers, you go for the story, the music, the sets and costumes, the choreography but mostly for the beautiful shapes the dancers make with their bodies.  Some dancers have a very graceful style with long limbs and “beautiful lines”.  I’ll try to find an example of what I mean.

 

The most important thing for the teacher when teaching a beginner to dance is teaching the basic technique and ensuring that the student is using the correct muscles because ballet has a very specific posture and this posture must become muscle memory.  When a student’s legs, arms and neck can be seen, the teacher can see whether the technique is correct and that the right muscles are being used.  This is partly to prevent bad habits which can make a student prone to injury.  An example is “turnout”; working turned out is at the very heart of ballet and the turnout MUST come from the hips, thighs and glutes, NOT from the knee.  

So the traditional ballet uniform of sheer tights (socks and bare legs for little children) and leotards does allow the teacher to see in detail which muscles are working.  In my daughter’s advanced associate classes (preparing dancers for full time training at 16) even the teenage ladies in the most senior classes had to wear a leotard and tights with no skirt so that their “lines” could be clearly seen.  I just wanted to explain the reasoning behind it for you so that if a compromise has to be reached, you will know that there’s no immodesty intended, if that makes sense!

 

So if your teacher can see your “lines”, your muscles working and your posture through opaque leggings, a long sleeved high necked leotard and a long but sheer skirt then there is no reason why you shouldn’t wear that to class with your hair covered, providing that you and your parents are happy.  (Here’s an example of a long (sometimes called “rehearsal length”) chiffon skirt.  Ones like this are worn for RAD Grades 6, 7 and 8):  https://www.movedancewear.com/tutus_and_skirts_dance_skirts-freed_repertoire_georgette_dance_skirt/1627/

 

Does that help at all? Good luck! 

 

PS Don’t worry about whether the teacher is a man - in “recreational” ballet classes for teenagers it’s still quite unusual to have male ballet teachers for girls’ only classes.   But you’ll be able to ask who the teacher is when you try the classes. 🙂

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