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Neil Armstrong - we are all part of his walk......


Anjuli_Bai
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I've just seen on the news that Neil Armstrong - the first human to walk on a sphere other than the Earth - has died. Though he walked on the moon - he is a son of the Earth.

 

Certainly, the landing on the moon was one of the more positive events of a century littered with the horrors of what our species is capable of.

 

For those of us who were alive and watched it breathlessly as it unfolded on black and white TV - a slightly fuzzy picture, it was a moment not to be forgotten. It was the culmination of many strands of expertise coming together and the brave few who actually carried out the adventure.

 

Out of it much science and innovation has come and it is a reminder that we do much better when we cooperate than when we threaten.

 

Rest in Peace Neil Armstrong and thank you for the wonder of it all.

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I was 11 when that happened and was part of a very small group allowed to watch it at junior school. We were chosen by who they thought would get the most from it but it was really unfair. All the kids should have seen it. RIP, Neil Armstrong. You inspired us for generations and for generations to come.

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A man, and others, with the 'right stuff.' I have a particular memory of the Apollo 11 days in that I was passing through California and across the Pacific to Hong Kong on a training flight over the period prior to the launch, and I remember encountering a variety of very exotic-looking variants of the C-135 (Boeing 707) operated by NASA in support of the mission. We got to Bahrain by lunar landing time and I think I heard it on the BBC World Service - a remarkable time.

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I remember going to school and all those who had parents at home, were sent home so we could all watch it. The school only had one TV and trying to get 950 people around it just wasn't going to work. I sat there glued to the screen with a little scrap book we had all been given. We had to collect drawings printed in the paper in the week prior to the landing. I still have the book.

book1.jpg

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I was living in my first flat at the time of the moon landings and remember several of us crushed up on the one sofa to watch it. I well remember the sense of awe we all felt, but it really wasn't until yesterday with the reports of Neil Armstrong's death that I was struck with the full significance of both the event itsle and of Armstrong's extraordinary qualities as a man. There can't be many left like him, and as one commentator said last night, one can only wonder what effect he might have left on world history had he been in politics rather than astronautics. I truly don't think that's putting it too highly.

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Last night I went outside and looked up at the moon and after all these years since the event, it was still a wonderment to think - that the imprint of a human footstep is still there....and will be ......

 

Separate from the event was the man. He didn't live off his fame but went steadily and quietly about his life.

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I was a month old at the time of Apollo 11 but I've been fascinated by the Apollo missions ever since my first visit to Kennedy Space Centre as a teenager. What I find really sad is that in a few years, there will be nobody left alive who walked on the moon.

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