Jump to content

Recommended Posts

9 hours ago, Fonty said:

Not that it makes it any less irritating, but it might explain it.

 

It might explain it, but it doesn't excuse it. Sorry if that sounds harsh, but if you know your child (of whatever age) might have difficulties understanding the plot, why not prepare your child - maybe for a couple of days before going - by telling them the story. Then explaining it won't e talking or singong, but they'll tell the story through their bodies. And that in order for everyone to enjoy the performance, and to become engaged and lost in the dreamworld, we all need to be quiet and focus our concentration on the stage. 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Kate_N I completely agree. 

 

Sorry but if a child is incapable of being silent for a whole performance and appreciating it, they shouldn’t be there (same applies for an adult!). I am willing to give a child slightly more leeway on some talking, but the parent/carer should be aware of their behaviours and moderate as appropriate. In this case it was more the mother encouraging the behaviour therefore the child must have thought it was ok to talk. 

 

The same way if an adult’s behaviour (talking, phones etc) detracts from a performance, a child’s behaviour is similarly distracting. 

 

@Fonty similarly whilst I have a lot of understanding for the situation you describe, I also think this shouldn’t have occurred. I know Saddler’s Wells do audio described performances; I don’t think ROH do but even so I think talking during a performance is very disruptive - no matter how noble the cause might be. Perhaps ROH should offer audio performances, or provide audio description via headphones which would enable them to attend any performance? Although the risk of this is that the headphone noise would leak out so the controls would need to be appropriately set as to not be excessively loud. 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last year at ROH for Nutcracker, sitting in the very back row of the Orchestra Stalls where I should have had a good view, I had a family with two young children - definitely school age but still young enough to sit on knees - right in front of me.  The one child in particular was passed along the relatives and sat on one knee or another all through the show.  At one point the mother moved seats so that the two girls could then sit together.  I am all for children in the theatre and maybe I have been lucky as DD has always just sat mesmerised by whatever has been on stage but it spoiled my evening.  Rant over - I have been holding this in for a year so it's time I let go!  :angry: ;)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing worse than badly behaved parents!  A great pity, because I have been in a theatre so many times with young children in the audience, who were impeccably behaved.  

 

18 minutes ago, Dancing Kitty said:

Last year at ROH for Nutcracker, sitting in the very back row of the Orchestra Stalls where I should have had a good view, I had a family with two young children - definitely school age but still young enough to sit on knees - right in front of me.  The one child in particular was passed along the relatives and sat on one knee or another all through the show.  At one point the mother moved seats so that the two girls could then sit together.  I am all for children in the theatre and maybe I have been lucky as DD has always just sat mesmerised by whatever has been on stage but it spoiled my evening.  Rant over - I have been holding this in for a year so it's time I let go!  :angry: ;)

 

Did you actually say anything to them? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Fonty said:

Did you actually say anything to them? 

 

Can recall exactly what I said but I did say all the moving around was distracting and I did get a reluctant sorry but it continued.  I kept thinking it would stop which it did for a bit then started again.  I would have asked to move if there had been any spare seats.  It was a last minute booking and DD was elsewhere and we were going to swap but I let her stay where she was.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe for very popular performances, the ROH could put on a 'relaxed' matinee for all the people who want to make noises or move around.  Then other audience members would at least be pre-warned this might happen.  I've been lucky in that I have been amazed at how well-behaved the kids have been within my own audience experience, but maybe I'm just not noticing because once I'm drawn into a performance I do tend to shut out everything except the stage from my consciousness, and in VERY good performances I don't even notice things at the periphery of the stage - I seem to almost become part of the ballet in spirit.  My partner on the other hand is very observant of all details from audience to auditorium to scenery and minor characters.  It's interesting how different minds work. I also find if I am reading a book, once really into it I don't hear noise in the room - and almost have to be awakened from a trance-like state to be spoken to!  Does anyone else experience that?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/12/2019 at 13:05, maryrosesatonapin said:

Maybe for very popular performances, the ROH could put on a 'relaxed' matinee for all the people who want to make noises or move around.  

 

I think that 'relaxed' performances are designed to help people who, for a variety of reasons, need to move around, express themselves freely and find concentration difficult.

It's a wonderful initiative. [Incidentally, the first screening of the R&J film at Sadlers Wells was advertised as 'relaxed' and with an interval inserted.]

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎10‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 13:05, maryrosesatonapin said:

Maybe for very popular performances, the ROH could put on a 'relaxed' matinee for all the people who want to make noises or move around.  Then other audience members would at least be pre-warned this might happen.  I've been lucky in that I have been amazed at how well-behaved the kids have been within my own audience experience, but maybe I'm just not noticing because once I'm drawn into a performance I do tend to shut out everything except the stage from my consciousness, and in VERY good performances I don't even notice things at the periphery of the stage - I seem to almost become part of the ballet in spirit.  My partner on the other hand is very observant of all details from audience to auditorium to scenery and minor characters.  It's interesting how different minds work. I also find if I am reading a book, once really into it I don't hear noise in the room - and almost have to be awakened from a trance-like state to be spoken to!  Does anyone else experience that?

 

 

When I watch a live performance I am quite good at ignoring noises and phone flashes but get irritated by people in front of me moving about. As for reading a book, I have to have complete silence :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Royal Opera House premiere for me last night: at the end of the first interval two young ladies returned to their seats (Upper Slips) with a large glass of red wine each, along with a plastic cup of water each. They got refills in the second interval, by which time the fashion was spreading. Couldn’t see the whole row but any number of drinks were being taken, from all manner of glasses and containers. 

 

Given the drop from the lower row of the Upper Slips - which is where these thirsty patrons were sitting - this seems not only against the rules and discourteous to others but positively dangerous. A glass dropped from that height could do real damage. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Mary said:

Did you tell an usher Geoff?

 

 

I would have done so if there was time but it all happened in the last moments before curtain up and I would have had to push past a whole row to get out. In the second interval all I could have said was to report something which had happened, rather than what was happening (I wasn’t to know they and others would return - again at the last minute - with yet more drinks).

 

Plenty of people saw and were near the door so could have said something but maybe there wasn’t an usher around that entrance, I didn’t see anyone (as a result my ticket wasn’t scanned).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it can be tricky. Perhaps they need to give us all a text number as they do on the trains these days- 'If you see something that doesn't look right..text the ushers...'

!

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Mary said:

Yes it can be tricky. Perhaps they need to give us all a text number as they do on the trains these days- 'If you see something that doesn't look right..text the ushers...'

!

 

 

The Royal Opera House Police...🤔 as they charge down the aisle giving it the full blues and tutus on the way to the scene of the incident 🚓 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Rob S said:

 

The Royal Opera House Police...🤔 as they charge down the aisle giving it the full blues and tutus on the way to the scene of the incident 🚓 

 

They could borrow the costumes from the Mayerling tavern scene. :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Geoff said:

 

I would have done so if there was time but it all happened in the last moments before curtain up and I would have had to push past a whole row to get out. In the second interval all I could have said was to report something which had happened, rather than what was happening (I wasn’t to know they and others would return - again at the last minute - with yet more drinks).

 

Plenty of people saw and were near the door so could have said something but maybe there wasn’t an usher around that entrance, I didn’t see anyone (as a result my ticket wasn’t scanned).

It might be an idea to write to the ROH and let them know that this happened, and that they should remind the ushers that this isn't allowed as it is very disruptive and potentially dangerous.  The ushers are usually very punctilious about telling people not to have even a cast list on a ledge, nor to bring any cups/glasses into the auditorium.  This was clearly an unusual breach of procedure. 

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ROH currently is the only theatrical haven where you can be certain you won’t be drenched by a fellow audience member’s glass of wine. I certainly hope they won’t change their policy.

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From my stalls circle position last Saturday night I saw someone carrying a glass back into the auditorium and two people eating ice creams in their stalls seats.  Is this allowed now?  I know people used to be allowed to eat ice creams in the auditorium during a Welcome Performance/Paul Hamlyn Welcome Treat, but I’ve never seen it otherwise. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It certainly isn't supposed to be: and I've seen people relieved of such things only recently.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All of this suggests to me that some people who attend live theatre and the cinema see it as an extension of their living room so they can and do behave as they like. My eldest daughter talks non stop over T.V. in a way she would never do and does not do in the theatre or the cinema. Perhaps people should be reminded that they are not at home and cannot behave in the way they would do there. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lizbie1 said:

Puts things into perspective:

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/dec/16/lawyer-repeatedly-punched-royal-opera-house-seat-dispute-court

 

Sounds like the couple both behaved rather badly!

 

I read about it earlier today...surely somebody else witnessed whether the coat was thrown on the floor or placed on the woman's lap not that either sounds very good, particularly if you then intend to sit next to the person for hours

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Rob S said:

 

I read about it earlier today...surely somebody else witnessed whether the coat was thrown on the floor or placed on the woman's lap not that either sounds very good, particularly if you then intend to sit next to the person for hours

 

If it was put on her lap I don't see that she'd have any real cause for complaint. From other reports it sounds like the coat might have been deliberately placed on the spare seat to deter the designer from sitting there again: the lawyer thought it "bad form" for the designer to appropriate the seat - but not apparently for him and his wife to disturb other members of the audience by swaying to the music and fidgeting loudly.

 

I'm not sure where I stand on people granting themselves a free seat upgrade in an otherwise crowded theatre, and had the spare seat been paid for by them (it wasn't) I'd have had some sympathy, though not with the punching bit! On balance though - even setting aside the fracas - I'd judge them to be more in the wrong than him.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm no expert on these things - but we might have to be a little careful about discussion of alive Court case.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Ian Macmillan said:

I'm no expert on these things - but we might have to be a little careful about discussion of alive Court case.

 

Even if we await only the sentence? Genuinely curious!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK - I see that a conviction has been established.  I had seen an earlier report, before the case got to that stage.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am puzzled as to why the fashion designer was the one who was subsequently arrested and then banned from the ROH.  

 

And I have no sympathy at all over the woman's coat.  There is a perfectly good, free cloakroom for coats.  If you take it in with you, you must be prepared to either have it on your lap or stuffed under your seat if someone wants to sit next to you, irrespective of whether the other person has, or hasn't, booked that particular seat.

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This afternoon, in the tight confines of the amphi,  the tall and broad man behind me had his very large and bulky coat on his lap- it bashed into me repeatedly as he settled down and I put up with it for a while then turned and smiled and indicated the problem- he seemed unconcerned but shifted it a bit. Then in Concerto it slid forward and settled heavily round my shoulders- I had to turn and try to indicate that he needed to move it..and he did eventually pull it back.

In Enigma, blow me but he did it again..the whole coat suddenly slid onto my head and almost over my face! This time I pushed it back rather sharply, as you would.

In the interval I said a quiet word and I thought he had got the message...

Imagine my amazement and annoyance when in Raymonda...the b. coat once again slowly descended onto my shoulders!  it would ALMOST have been funny but it really wasn't as I wanted to watch the ballet, not wrestle with some strange man's outerwear.

 

Some people don't seem to notice there is anyone else in the world around them....

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...