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56 minutes ago, Scheherezade said:

I don’t disagree, Balletfanp, just pointing out how much more balanced the amphitheatre audience was. With a balancing acknowledgment of my own that Osipova was, however, as others have pointed out, at the top of her game on Monday. I must say that there wasn’t any discernible bias in my part of the amphitheatre as whoops and claps were afforded to pretty much everyone. 

 

No criticism of your comment intended, Scheherazade 🙂 - I’m seeing that cast on Saturday and very much looking forward to seeing Osipova. Just pointing out that the one-sidedness of that section of the audience seemed rather miserable....

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1 minute ago, Balletfanp said:

 

No criticism of your comment intended, Scheherazade 🙂 - I’m seeing that cast on Saturday and very much looking forward to seeing Osipova. Just pointing out that the one-sidedness of that section of the audience seemed rather miserable....

 

As, indeed, it is.

Changing the topic somewhat, I noticed that the ushers, for the first time in ages  (or the first time that I’ve noticed), were instructing audience members at the front of the amphitheatre not to place anything on the ledge in front of them.

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Sorry to hear about the disruptive school party.

As a retired teacher I did take Junior age children ( 7-11) to the theatre including the ballet quite a bit at one time but can honestly say was pretty hawk eyed at any signs of disruptive behaviour! 

It is probably easier for a teacher of younger children to separate certain children from sitting together and we always had a teacher on either end of the row and in the middle too. I don't ever remember sitting next to another member of staff on these occasions. 

We looked after any  sweets ( luckily phones were not a problem in those days!) and gave them out just for the Interval ( and the journey home) but didn't encourage them to bring any. 

They were mostly well behaved I have to say .....occasionally getting a bit excited if they recognised bits we had rehearsed! 

I think Secondary children are more difficult in a way especially if haven't been prepared for a performance they are attending. 

But I do think the teachers if they had seen any problems should have intervened and at least apologised to those who had been disturbed .....though it looked from the post that they did in this instance. 

We only ever attended matinees so am assuming this was a matinee too? 

There are always more children attending matinees .....though of course from other posts here it's seems the adults can be just as disruptive on occasions!!

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3 hours ago, Scheherezade said:

 

Far more generous crowd in the amphitheatre, with much appreciation shown all round. Although, to be fair to Osipova, she was very good on Monday. 

 

Muntagirov was rather good, too ;) 

 

2 hours ago, Scheherezade said:

I don’t disagree, Balletfanp, just pointing out how much more balanced the amphitheatre audience was. With a balancing acknowledgment of my own that Osipova was, however, as others have pointed out, at the top of her game on Monday. I must say that there wasn’t any discernible bias in my part of the amphitheatre as whoops and claps were afforded to pretty much everyone. 

 

Standing in Stalls Circle, it was pretty noticeable to me that there were a lot of Osipova enthusiasts in the audience, at least at stalls level.

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 @LinMM my point was the teachers didn’t intervene and wouldn’t have spoken to us unless my son had made a point of speaking to one of them. They can’t have failed to hear him ask them to sit still during the second act, it’s a tiny theatre and the staff were on the row behind the pupils. My son is a young adult and got the attention of some of the audience himself at the end of the show for speaking up - some positive comments for doing what others felt unable to do. 

 

Edited to add there are more boxes in this theatre( Theatre Royal Bury St Ed’s) than others so if taking a group with pupils known to be disruptive why not book one and staff sit them? 

Edited by Jane
To add final sentence

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Last night, at Northern Ballet's Victoria, at Sadler's Wells, a woman (I think) in the centre of one of the front rows of the Second Circle seemed to be consulting her phone for quite a while, including the first pas de deux between Victoria and Albert - she was quite oblivious to the usher's attempts to get her to stop, or the fact that her screen was creating a pool of light which could be seen by ... whatever 90% of the capacity of the Second Circle is, I should think.  Really annoying :( 

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17 minutes ago, alison said:

Last night, at Northern Ballet's Victoria, at Sadler's Wells, a woman (I think) in the centre of one of the front rows of the Second Circle seemed to be consulting her phone for quite a while, including the first pas de deux between Victoria and Albert - she was quite oblivious to the usher's attempts to get her to stop, or the fact that her screen was creating a pool of light which could be seen by ... whatever 90% of the capacity of the Second Circle is, I should think.  Really annoying :( 

And selfish too the other audience members and cast. 

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Oh yes, because you can see to the back of the theatre from on stage - I don't know whether the stage lighting would prevent that, though.

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2 hours ago, alison said:

 

Muntagirov was rather good, too ;) 

Standing in Stalls Circle, it was pretty noticeable to me that there were a lot of Osipova enthusiasts in the audience, at least at stalls level.

 

But a friend has told me that some Osipova fans in her vicinity did not consider Muntagirov merited a clap at any juncture.

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Strange people.  Personally, I'd say I think he did even more than she did ;) 

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2 hours ago, capybara said:

 

But a friend has told me that some Osipova fans in her vicinity did not consider Muntagirov merited a clap at any juncture.

 

Obviously not real ballet fans, then. 🙂

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Surely paying members of the audience are free to express their approval or disapproval of a performance as they see fit? It's hardly a question of good or bad manners. Whether or not another member of the audience agrees with their reaction is irrelevant.

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Oh, absolutely, Douglas.

 

But anyone who doesn't think Muntagirov is worthy of applause must need to have their eyesight checked.  In my opinion, of course.........

Edited by Fonty
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Well where I was sitting there was enthusiastic applause for both - a beautiful partnership should be appreciated even more

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On 28/03/2019 at 18:00, Douglas Allen said:

Surely paying members of the audience are free to express their approval or disapproval of a performance as they see fit? It's hardly a question of good or bad manners. Whether or not another member of the audience agrees with their reaction is irrelevant.

To clap only one person and ignore everybody else is downright rude in my opinion.

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Last night at the ROH during near the end of the first scene of Act III of R&J, at a particularly dramatic moment (just as Juliet was in the throes of deciding to leave to see the Friar) someone walked along the back of the Stalls Circle, presumably to an exit, making an almighty clunking sound with each step. I can appreciate some problem may have necessitated their leaving but you would think they would at least have tried to do it quietly.

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On 29/03/2019 at 01:43, capybara said:

But a friend has told me that some Osipova fans in her vicinity did not consider Muntagirov merited a clap at any juncture.

 

 

Ha ha ha! This is reminiscent of the highly partisan "claques" of audience members in the height of the Romantic ballet in Paris in the 19th Century - scuffles and fights between auduence members over the relative merits of their favoured dancers were not unknown 😉

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17 hours ago, Richard LH said:

Last night at the ROH during near the end of the first scene of Act III of R&J, at a particularly dramatic moment (just as Juliet was in the throes of deciding to leave to see the Friar) someone walked along the back of the Stalls Circle, presumably to an exit, making an almighty clunking sound with each step. I can appreciate some problem may have necessitated their leaving but you would think they would at least have tried to do it quietly.

I  also  hate it when people start piling out whilst the performers are still taking a well deserved bow. Then I refuse to move. I recall Lesley Garret once responding  with ' have you lot got a bus to catch'. I don't like the drink being taken into the auditorium either, someone left leaving a plastic glass in front of their seat, which I inadvertently crushed when I left.

But its good to vent and have a good moan.

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17 hours ago, Kate_N said:

 

 

Ha ha ha! This is reminiscent of the highly partisan "claques" of audience members in the height of the Romantic ballet in Paris in the 19th Century - scuffles and fights between auduence members over the relative merits of their favoured dancers were not unknown 😉

 

17 hours ago, Kate_N said:

 

 

Ha ha ha! This is reminiscent of the highly partisan "claques" of audience members in the height of the Romantic ballet in Paris in the 19th Century - scuffles and fights between auduence members over the relative merits of their favoured dancers were not unknown 😉

That sounds like my kind of performance, can we reinstate it.

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37 minutes ago, ninamargaret said:

I believe opera audiences in Italy can be pretty vocal in making their opinions known!

 

They were renowned for that in the days of Maria Callas and Renata Tebaldi.

I got a sense of that too when I last saw performances at the Bolshoi and Stanislavsky Theatres in Moscow.

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I remember seeing a piece of straight theatre (an Ostrovsky play) once on one of my visits to Moscow, just after the dissolution of the USSR - about 1993/4 I think. The leading lady (wearing a sash with Soviet medals) entered, and before starting her dialogue., walked diagonally downstage and took a bow, then walked back upstage (without turning her back on us), and started the scene.

 

Wonderful!

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On 29/03/2019 at 21:31, Richard LH said:

Last night at the ROH during near the end of the first scene of Act III of R&J, at a particularly dramatic moment (just as Juliet was in the throes of deciding to leave to see the Friar) someone walked along the back of the Stalls Circle, presumably to an exit, making an almighty clunking sound with each step. I can appreciate some problem may have necessitated their leaving but you would think they would at least have tried to do it quietly.

I was standing nearby and it was very loud and very distracting.  Today I was standing in the same place and a woman coughed loudly all the way through Act 2 of DonQ.  People complained to the usher, and I told him it was like being in a Victorian TB ward. She should have done the decent thing and left the auditorium.  

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5 hours ago, Sim said:

I was standing nearby and it was very loud and very distracting.  Today I was standing in the same place and a woman coughed loudly all the way through Act 2 of DonQ.  People complained to the usher, and I told him it was like being in a Victorian TB ward. She should have done the decent thing and left the auditorium.  

 

Yes the clunking was very distracting and seemed rather weird just at that moment. But at least it was over quickly, unlike  having to suffer someone coughing through a whole Act - particularly such a  beautiful one.  Every sympathy, Sim !

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A couple of days before making a rare trip to London to see 'Akhnaten' at the Coliseum I developed the worst cough I've had for decades. Despite equipping myself with cough mixture, lozenges and bottled water I was terrified I'd become That Awful Person Who Coughs All the Way Through. Mercifully, other than a minor spasm near the beginning I remained cough-free throughout the performance - only to make up for it at the hotel, where my seal-like barking caused the woman in the next room to knock on my door and ask if I needed help!

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The worst things I have seen:

 

Playing with a big phone just surfing facebook for a while during the kingdom of shades.

 

I would say it is not only rude but a crime.

 

Yes it happened last year at La Bayadere opening night with Nela/Osipova/Vadim cast at RoH. I was at Row A Amphitheater(sitting at Amphi for the shades and music!) The women sitting next to me clearly has zero interest in ballet. She took out her phone and random played the apps. I was so astonished that I did not know what to say. Two gentlemen behind me knocked her and told her stop after several minutes. To save some face, she did not turn it off immediately but continued for a minute then turned off... 

 

Then they confronted her and criticized her during the interval. She did not come back. This kind of behavior is not associated with age or race. I am holding a young friend card and the gentlemen behind us were minorities. It was just so... appalling...

 

Usually if you attend the opening night and sit in front row, you will sit next to art lovers. I don't know what happens that day... 

 

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Big disturbance mid-aria at this afternoon’s Berenice when a lady with a sides standing ticket was asked not to sit on the standing platform with her legs over the side towards the stage (difficult to explain unless you’re familiar with the set-up). She was very angry about it - I gather she claimed to have been told by the box office that there were stools available.

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Sounds like one of those cases where there’s no right answer.

 

I’m probably more willing than most to intervene when someone near me is misbehaving, but when there’s nothing I can do about it - and this would have been such an occasion - I’ve become quite good at ignoring even quite large disturbances. I’ve said it before here, but two incidents occurring quite close together helped me to this state: the first when I, very wrongly, found myself getting annoyed about paramedics dealing with an incident within the auditorium for the best part of an act; the other was when I - politely! - mentioned a loudly ticking watch during a piano recital and it turned out that its owner had an artificial limb, which caused the extra resonance. (She said no-one had ever noticed it before - I choose to take that as a compliment to my hearing rather than a subtle dig at my rudeness!)

 

I also try to bear in mind that reverent silence during a performance is a relatively recent phenomenon.

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