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trog

Misplaced ear worms

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In response to :

"Who's got a head like a pingpong ball?" (Sung round a scout/guide campfire)
 
And anyone else know "Oh father, look at Uncle Jim, diving in the bathtub, learning how to swim" ? That's the one that really gets me.
 
(Perhaps these misplaced earworms need their own section, so people don't alight on them unexpectedly and get caught!!!)


I know it's a bit early in the year but

While shepherds washed their sox by night
All seated 'round the tub
A bar of Sunlight soap came down
And they began to scrub.

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I've just had to go on Wikipedia and look up what an ear worm was. It sounded gross. I'm always getting songs in my head, just like my mother used to. Usually it's the theme tune to Family Guy.

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Mary had a little pram

Its wheels were perfect squares

And everywhere that Mary went

The baby said its prayers

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Oh dear, earworms with Mondegreen complications.

 

Sounds nasty...

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The version I know is

 

Oh Jemima, look at your Uncle Jim,

in the duckpond learning how to swim.

First he does the breast stroke and then he does the side,

now he's under the water swimming against the tide!

 

My school has just had its annual performance - certain pieces of music became impossible to get out of my head after a concentrated rehearsal!  

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Melody:  As a Scot, I do wonder about the 'Mondegreen' business and was quite surprised when I first came across it as a phenomenon for I'd never been in any doubt concerning those words of "The Bonnie Earl O' Moray."  And as it's now ringing in my ear, excuse me whilst I assume a suitable heldentenor pose to declaim:

 

Ye Hielands and Ye Lowlands,

O whaur hae ye been?

They hae slain the Earl O' Moray

And ..... Lady Mondegreen????

 

Surely not?  Is 'laid him on the green' so impenetrable?  (But there are words that probably need footnotes later on!)

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The version I know is

 

Oh Jemima, look at your Uncle Jim,

in the duckpond learning how to swim.

First he does the breast stroke and then he does the side,

now he's under the water swimming against the tide!

 

My school has just had its annual performance - certain pieces of music became impossible to get out of my head after a concentrated rehearsal!  

 

The version I know has two verses!

 

Oh Jemima, look at your Uncle Jim,

He's in the duckpond learning how to swim.

First he does the breast stroke and then he does the crawl,

Now he's under the water and he can't be seen at all!

 

 

Oh Jemima, look at your Uncle Jim,

He's in the duckpond learning how to swim.

First he does the back stroke and then he does the side,

Now he's under the water swimming against the tide!

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Interesting - as I typed it out, "breaststroke" came automatically, but later I wondered if it should have been "backstroke".  Obviously at some point the two verses were blended!  And to do it properly you have to do the movements at the same time!

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Melody:  As a Scot, I do wonder about the 'Mondegreen' business and was quite surprised when I first came across it as a phenomenon for I'd never been in any doubt concerning those words of "The Bonnie Earl O' Moray."  And as it's now ringing in my ear, excuse me whilst I assume a suitable heldentenor pose to declaim:

 

Ye Hielands and Ye Lowlands,

O whaur hae ye been?

They hae slain the Earl O' Moray

And ..... Lady Mondegreen????

 

Surely not?  Is 'laid him on the green' so impenetrable?  (But there are words that probably need footnotes later on!)

 

Well, I think it was an American writer who claimed her sister had misheard it - maybe she didn't know what a green was.

 

We have a small reindeer toy thingy as well as a life-size-ish one among our Christmas decorations; after hearing the wonderful mondegreen in Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer, we've taken to calling the small one Olive ("Olive the other reindeer, laughed at him and called him names...") Sad, really, but there it is.

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This used to be a popular feature on certain radio programmes back in the day, Noel Edmund's daily Radio 1 show for example.  I remember well 'It's a hard egg, nothing but a hard egg' and that all-time favourite 'Oh, Oh, my ears are alight'.

 

Linda

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I remember Paul Young's song - Everytime you go away, you take a piece of meat with you.

There was also Abba's Gimme Gimme Gimme ( a man until/after midnight). I always heard the line Take me through the darkness as Take me to the doctor's at the break of the day. 

S'pose either could be right. :)

Edited by Jacqueline
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Mine was Dusty Springfield singing "You don't have to say you love me, just because I'm tanned". It was a long time before I found out the truth!

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I was at primary school when Grease came out. None of us had seen the film yet and only  a very lucky few had the double album. But we all used to sing Olivia Newton John's song as Hope He Divorces You !!

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Current tv ad earworms for me are "Easter cr*p" at insert supermarket name here. They must be saying Easter crack, as in eggs. But it doesn't sound like it. Come to think of it, neither version sounds too good.

The other ad is for a brand of fabric conditioner which will provide "comfort in tents." Must be powerful stuff as that is quite a big ask, unless you are glamping perhaps.:huh:

 

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The Cream song Badge - what I think is actually "Now he's married to Mabel" I always thought was "No he's not a tomato"!

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for me, Adele's James Bond theme song goes "is it trifle? is it crumble?"

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58 minutes ago, Quintus said:

for me, Adele's James Bond theme song goes "is it trifle? is it crumble?"

Isn't it trifaw, cwumbaw? Our Adele being the queen of estuawee English? :rolleyes:

Then there's that famous ditty by Billy Jo Spears - Blanket on the Ground. For years I thought she was singing Just because we are married, don't mean we can't sleep around.

Funny, that's exactly what I thought marriage did mean. I have since discovered, having heard the song again recently, she was actually singing  We can't SLIP around. Presumably a reference to the possibility that despite being married, folks can still have fun. With the person to whom they are married. Oooh I see.:)

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Funny that people have bumped this thread all of a sudden.  I was just doing the washing up when I realised that it's over a month now since I went to see An American in Paris, and I still have "I'll Build a Stairway to Paradise" intermittently on the brain!

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On 17/05/2016 at 16:16, trog said:

In response to :

 

I know it's a bit early in the year but

 

While shepherds washed their sox by night
All seated 'round the tub
A bar of Sunlight soap came down
And they began to scrub.

 

Very posh, Trog.  We used to sing the last two lines:

 

The angel of the Lord came down,

And gave their bums a scrub. 

 

And while we are on the subject of Christmas carols, when We Three Kings was being sung, my brother used to sing:

 

We 4 kings of Liverpool are,

George in a taxi, Paul in a car,

John on a scooter, beeping his hooter,

Following Ringo Starr.

 

That may have to be explained to the youngsters on here!

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I always remember a song that came out in 1989 called "who's in the house" and I was convinced it was "Bugs in the house" and could not be persuaded otherwise for years!

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A week on from Good Friday and I'm still with Bach's "Herr, unser Herrscher etc ..." when I need to be making headroom for John Adams' "On the Transmigration of Souls."  Looks simple on the page but it's proving far from that, I fear.

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Years ago there was a programme on the BBC World Service, presented by Gordon Clyde, where you could send in requests for music. A man wrote in asking for an aria from Rigoletto which his very young son persisted in calling 'elephant's ears'. It was "La Donna e' mobile", and I've never been able to get it out of my head since. 

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On 14/04/2017 at 01:26, alison said:

I was just doing the washing up when I realised that it's over a month now since I went to see An American in Paris, and I still have "I'll Build a Stairway to Paradise" intermittently on the brain!

 

Currently ousted, since the BBC Young Dancer final, by "If I Didn't Care".  Aaaagh!

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When you swim in the sea

And an eel bites your knee

 

That's a moray

 

 

That's been going round in my brain since the weekend!!!!

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Dave you really need to keep off the sauce....!!  :lol:

 

My ear worm since last Friday night is the Giselle Act 2 pdd music.  This happened to me last run of Giselle too;  the music just never went out of my head.  I even had Led Zeppelin on my headphones on my to work this morning, and Giselle is still going round my brain.  Luckily I love it!!  :)

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Lucky you, Sim!  One performance of Giselle, it turned out, wasn't actually enough to evict various bits of La Sylphide, which keep coming back - the reel in particular!

 

Not to mention that yesterday morning, or possibly the day before, I had the Brotherhood of Man's "Save All Your Kisses For Me" on the brain (for our younger readers, UK 1976 winner of the Eurovision Song Contest!) - I have no idea where that came from!

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Thanks for starting this thread, Dave - I could have sworn we already had one, and was intending to post about La Sylphide anyway.

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