Jump to content

Dance Training Abroad


anondancer_15
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello!

 

My dance teacher suggested I look at dance training overseas (still in europe though probably rather than like america) bc the fees are cheaper and the training is supposedly of a higher standard than here in the uk. I was just wondering if anyone had any experience about this, or knew of anywhere of interest i should have a look at? thank you!

 

Edited to add: by this i mean training post 18, i.e. university/vocational school equivalent!!

Edited by anondancer_15
Link to comment
Share on other sites

probably more contemporary based! yes definitely applying in the uk - my current list is laban, london contemporary, northern contemporary, i'm also looking at edge hill uni, liverpool institute for performing arts and middlesex... 

 

i'm thinking going abroad will most likely not happen at all but i guess its worth a look to see what the options are? however i literally have no idea where to start looking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

just to clarify - i'm not trying to put a downer on the training here in the uk, i'm just trying to consider all of the options possible! 

 

I am considering rambert though it is so prestigious and very technical i'm concerned they're looking for a certain body type and physicality etc. also the £60 for application without even a guaranteed audition is slightly off putting...I would love to train at Rambert.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have no inside info on Rambert but I don't think they're looking for a certain body type any more than any of the other contemporary schools (if anyone knows differently, please correct me!) I agree that the Rambert application fee is off putting though, especially with no audition guarantee but if that's the training you want I guess there is no way around it.

 

You are wise to consider all options including schools abroad, but keep in mind that the top schools in Europe are also very prestigious with a high technical standard and are extremely competitive to get in to.

 

Have you looked at London Studio Centre?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My dd only auditioned for ballet courses so I'm not sure what body type Contemporary schools would be looking for. I wouldn't think it's *as* particular in terms of long legs/long neck/slim/small head etc. being desirable for ballet, but I would think physically strong would be a good starting point, and with a solid background of ballet or contemporary training. If you aren't already at full-time school, then having attended a good Associate scheme, CAT scheme or youth dance company like ENB YouthCo would be good to put on the application.

 

For dance degrees at Uni I would think it's less prescriptive and here's where UCAS points from Vocational exams, along with good solid A'Level results would be most useful. You will still need stamina and strength though as dancing every day does come as a shock to the system.

 

Have you looked at photos on the course websites? That might show you current students and give you an idea of the "look" each school likes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I should think that if Rambert is looking for a particular 'body type' then so are most other properly professional training programmes. I think you need to be very careful, and also very realistic about what you're auditioning for, and what you want to achieve through three years of professional-level dance training (I work in a university performing arts context).

 

laban, london contemporary, northern contemporary, i'm also looking at edge hill uni, liverpool institute for performing arts and middlesex.

 

Of those, I'd say that Laban, LCDS, Northern, and also Rambert are going to give you really intensive top-notch contemporary training. Frankly Edge HIll & Middlesex, not so much. They will offer you a three year BA (Hons) in Dance, but not necessarily at a training intensity - nor standard of entrants frankly - to be really fully equipped for work as a professional dancer.

 

But they will give you an all-round arts degree, which is also very useful for developing a career, just maybe not as a full-time dancer (there are always exceptions). And if you decide to take the University degree option, rather than the intensive professional training as at Laban or The Place  (although they also offer degrees), then I wouldn't be looking at Edge Hill or Middlesex. They're not highly ranked in the field: Roehampton or Surrey universities are far more demanding courses, with a better all round education.

 

Do you know how you perform in relation to others at your age/education level? I think you need to audition for a few places such as Laban or LCDS, to see how you go, and whether a career as a dance professional is realistic for you.

 

As for training elsewhere in Europe (remember we are European too!) Yes, there are not the equivalent of £9k pa tuition fees (although the actual cost of a performing arts degree in the UK is nearer to £12k pa) but sometimes you really do get what you pay for!

 

Other European countries rarely have the mix of academic and conservatoire studies that we have in the UK. The ability to study for a degree level qualification in dance at Laban etc is unique. Other European education systems tend to separate out training into conservatoires, and higher education into universities.

 

OK, so you won't pay fees in other EU countries. You also will have difficulty getting a loan or maintenance grant to live on, and you won't always be able to study in English. Do you have family elsewhere in Europe? Do you have another language? Are you comfortable going to another city in another country and finding a flat or house share? Most other EU countries don't have the standard hall of residence style of student accommodation - students either live at home and commute  (like my French family) or flat share as young working adults (like my German family).

 

These are just things you need to think about and be confident you'll be OK about! It's a big & complex set of decisions. Good luck!

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Netherlands have several well known contemporary dance companies including Nederlands Danse Theatre and Introdans. Looking at the dancer biographies would give you an idea of the background they have come from.


The arts ( and arts education) are well supported by the Dutch government and consequently the facilities and tuition are excellent. The Bachelor degree fees for European students are around 2 000 Euros per annum and most of the dance courses are taught in English. It is necessary to have a University entrance qualification to enrol in a degree course so most students are a minimum of 18 years at the start of the first year.


Here are some links for Bachelor courses in the Netherlands: Fontys, Tilburg http://fontys.edu/Bachelors-masters/Bachelors/Dance-Academy.htm ;Codarts, Rotterdam http://www.codarts.nl/programmes/dance/dance/ and Amsterdam University of the Arts (de Theaterschool), Amsterdam http://www.ahk.nl/en/theaterschool/study-programmes/?tx_solr[filter][0]=discipline:dans&tx_solr[filter][1]=discipline:dance


Edited by Lucinda
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is the website (English language version) of Palucca University of Dance (= Palucca Hochschule für Tanz) in Dresden, Germany. This school also offers Bachelor/Master programmes and has many international students.

 

http://www.palucca.eu/en/degree_programmes.html

 

From the FAQs:

 

"The Palucca University of Dance Dresden is a public body. It is a university of the arts with an integrated secondary school as a special feature."

 

(...)

 

"The Palucca University of Dance Dresden does not charge tuition fees for first degree courses."

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was told that Netherland Dance Theatre is considered one of the best contemp companies in the world. One of DSs friends has just got a contract there and is over the moon.

 

Re training in Amsterdam in case it helps with deliberation to know some practical details: costs for a bachelors program such as the theatre school are 1500 Euros a year. You can only get a student loan if you work (I think about 50 hours a month, and there are jobs classed as for students available). DS is staying at the student hotel (imagine the most uber cool hall of residence on the planet) costing about 680 euros a month so additional costs are then food and normal spending money (reduced of course if you get a job I guess, but DS is spending about 14 hours a day in the studio so its not possible for him!)... He bought a bike for 230 Euros so no travel costs. You can get shared rooms for less than the student hotel but housing is scarce so VERY hard to find esp if you aren't local...

So altogether expensive of course, but possibly less than university in the UK....?

 

NB I know also Palucca has scholarships available as DS was offered one, so others may also have...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As an educator, my view is that you should first of all seek out the best education for you, then look at how you're going to pay for it, rather than choose simply because something is cheaper. UK education is not expensive - it's tremendously good value for money amortised over a lifetime, if you choose the right programme for you. My US colleagues would confirm this (where bog standard degrees at rather unimpressive universities generally start at around $20k per year, before bed & board).

 

Obviously how you pay for it comes into the equation, but choosing simply on low cost is a potentially bad value for money decision. Think of it as investing in your future, and the costs come into proportion & focus.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I completely agree that a further education course should not primarily be chosen because it is cheaper. However tuition costs can significant and it is a fact of life that some European countries subside higher education costs considerably more than the UK.

In Germany for example, there are no tuition costs even for non Europeans and as stated before The Netherlands heavily subsidises higher education tuition.

Edited by Lucinda
Link to comment
Share on other sites

thank you all for your responses and advice!!

 

i am aware that university dance degrees are going to be very different to vocational schools such as laban, but i am visiting and possibly applying for both to keep my options open. I'd ideally like to be a professional dancer in some kind of company and have always been leaning more towards vocational training, however I have been convinced more recently to apply for uni as well or at least look at the different options. Edge hill was recommended to me by my dance teacher who said that it was one of the better dance courses and had more of a vocational feel than others. (I have eliminated multiple choices of uni as the courses only seem to prepare you to go into dance education in schools etc, which is not my main objective)

 

I also completely understand that choosing a course based on fees is not something i should do and neither is it one that i was going to, but obviously fees do come into the picture! i have to be somewhere that can offer a loan, so for example BTUKS went out the window when i realised there is absolutely no funding help. 

 

and Kate_N, as for how I perform against others, I'm predicted an A in A Level Dance, I did a CAT scheme last year and do various youth dance companies outside of school also :) 

 

i've had a look at a couple of schools abroad and none of them are particularly grabbing my attention, i don't really think it's going to be feasible!

think i've replied to everything there!!! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BTUKS does have some scholarships and help available. Have you auditioned there?

 

I also meant to ask whether you are or have been an Associate or on a CAT scheme?

I went to the BTUK open day earlier this year and did class there (all the other girls had already got places for this year so it was super awkward' and loved the school but my mum was very put off by the funding. I think they only give out a couple of scholarships but other than that there's not a whole lot of help compared to say, getting a student loan.

 

I did the Hertfordshire CAT scheme last year and im continuing training where I did that, I'm also auditioning for tring CBA this year. I also do a couple of youth dance companies and do RAD Ballet twice a week.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you seen that The Hammond in Chester now offer a BA Honours degree course (applications through UCAS and university of Chester). It is musical theatre rather than just dance. You would need to look for more detail on the course to see if it offered enough dance for you.

thanks, im looking for more of a dance course though. much as I love MT I can't sing for toffee!!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I don't speak Dutch, but German, and if you click on the "Jeugd"  (youth) menu, you'll see the list of classes. There seem to be 3 locations - so you'd probably need to pick the one closest to where you are in Amsterdam.

 

But you could telephone them: most Dutch people speak excellent English (at least, far better than most English people\s Dutch!).

Edited by Kate_N
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...