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  1. Does anyone know the names given to the five fairies (ie excluding the Lilac Fairy) in the first performances of The Sleeping Beauty in St Petersburg in 1890, or is able to refer me to a webpage or whatever that gives the names. I've tried to find out and have come across the following names for fairies one to five: the Tender fairy, the Playful, the Generous, the Brave, the Carefree (presumably these names relate to the gifts they brought, ie tenderness, playfulness, etc), but I need to know whether these names are correct. Thank you.
  2. This program of The Sleeping Beauty prologue and Abrazo, a premiere by Nayon Iovino, got me wondering if, at a time when dancers' faces must be partially covered, choosing repertory that leans more toward control than abandon is such a prudent choice. More thoughts here in my review.
  3. The Bluebird in The Sleeping Beauty Although my only qualification is enthusiasm, I lead a ballet appreciation group and recently sent the following to members. Thought it might interest Forum members. In the last Act of The Sleeping Beauty Puss-in-Boots and Little Red Riding Hood appear, these characters being from Charles Perrault’s fairytales, published in 1697. The Act also includes the Bluebird and Princess Florine. Although I’ve seen the ballet many times I’ve not understood why a Bluebird and a Princess Florine appear. Having watched various parts of the recent streaming by the Royal Opera House ­– I enjoyed Fumi Kaneko’s performance as Aurora – I turned to the internet to find out about these two characters, having only come across bluebirds flying over Judy Garland’s rainbow. Evidently, in mythology, the bluebird is a sign of happiness, prosperity, good health, and the arrival of Spring, the blue plumage being associated with the sky and eternal happiness. I found what I consider a possible connection between a bluebird and the ballet in Wikipedia’s ‘The Blue Bird (fairy tale)’. This fairy tale was published by Baroness d’Aulnoy in 1697 (the same year Perrault published his stories), the Baroness being the person who in 1690 first coined the phrase ‘fairytale’. Very briefly the plot is: widower King, who has beautiful daughter Princess Florine, marries not very nice widowed Queen who has ugly, selfish daughter Truitonne. Visiting the kingdom, Prince Charming falls in love with Florine, Queen and daughter do all they can to prevent Prince Charming and Princess Florine marrying so that he marries Truitonne instead, and as a last resort Truitonne’s fairy godmother turns the Prince into a bluebird. But all ends happily ever after for the Prince and Princess Florine. So, perhaps an explanation of why the Bluebird and Princess Florine appear in the ballet. As a child Aurora would have known this story along with those of Puss-In-Boots and Little Red Riding Hood. To round off, back to Judy Garland’s song, the second verse: Somewhere over the rainbow Bluebirds fly. Birds fly over the rainbow, Why then, oh why can’t I? If happy little bluebirds fly Beyond the rainbow, Why, oh why can’t I? In the film The Wizard of Oz, Dorothy is told by her Aunt to find a place where she won’t get into more trouble. Dorothy muses, ‘is there a place where there isn’t any trouble?’. Thinking there must be, but you cannot get there by a boat or a train, she imagines such a place being ‘far, far away ... beyond the rainbow’. At their wedding to their Prince, both Princess Florine and Princess Aurora would of course be ‘over the rainbow’ with happiness.
  4. An unexpected (given their scheduling) pleasure to have O'Sullivan/Hay dance the General Rehearsal today I didn't catch all the cast changes, can anyone confirm who danced the Fairy of the Crystal Fountain ?
  5. I know that this run still has a week to go before opening night but I thought some may enjoy reading my interview with Delia Mathews as she prepares to make her debut as Aurora alongside Brandon Lawrence. http://tothepointemagazine.wixsite.com/tothepointemagazine/single-post/2018/01/27/ToThePointe-Meets-Delia-Mathews xx
  6. There's a very interesting sub-discussion developed in the current Royal Ballet Sleeping Beauty thread, and I don't think it deserves to get swallowed up in there, so here are some of the highlights: Betterankles posted an excerpt of the Lilac Fairy from Maina Gielgud's production here - I couldn't persuade it to copy over:
  7. Please PM me and leave a message here if you can help. Thanks
  8. I’ve a spare SCS (D29) for Sleeping Beauty (Naghdi/Ball) Thursday 14/11 available. Paper ticket but I’ll be there both Weds & Thursday to hand it over. £11 DM me if interested.
  9. If you have a spare SCS ticket for this performance I’d love to buy it. thanks
  10. Hi if anybody has 2 tickets for Sleeping Beauty 9th November @ 7:30pm I would be very interested!
  11. Hi, Anybody got any tickets available for Sleeping Beauty? Monday 2nd December @ 7:30pm Thursday 12th December @7:30pm
  12. Apologies if this information has already appeared elsewhere on the Forum but the discovery is perhaps important enough to warrant its own topic. Drawings of Sleeping Beauty Act III PDD by the first Prince Désiré, Pavel Gerdt, were discovered in Moscow in 2018. Some of the drawings have since started to come into circulation as they were recently used by Ratmansky for the latest revival of his Sleeping Beauty reconstruction for ABT. Thanks to others I have found a few links which show a little of this new found treasure: https://tinyurl.com/yxdvku3o https://petipasociety.com/2018/12/16/sketches-by-pavel-gerdt-released-by-the-bolshoi-theatre-museum/?fbclid=IwAR1hn4B3T_1tvEUnCE5fLLVoPUksOqCm0gw9FvIbvWorrEiPzoOxTEGdL_I http://oteatre.info/petipa-ps/ It would be great if the full set of drawings was properly online somewhere, does anyone know if this has been done? The last link (the Russian one) apparently credits one snapshot to otzyv.ru but that doesn't seem to lead anywhere (however I may well have misunderstood) Any further information very gratefully received. Short of a video from 1890 (!) this is as good and as early as has been discovered to date when it comes to at least one part of this ballet.
  13. I took 2 children aged 7 and 5 to a performance of ENB's My First Ballet: the Sleeping Beauty at Richmond Theatre. They loved it - so job well done. I didn't love it quite so much although I love the concept of these ballets. The ballet was narrated throughout, which was excellent and it also mirrored the mime happening on stage, which I really appreciated. Not sure any of the children did, but never mind. I learned quite a lot about mime. The story of the Sleeping Beauty was changed quite significantly. No spinning wheel (old fashioned I assume), so Aurora is pricked by a rose, not a spindle. This negates the need for the Rose Adagio (as she would have been pricked), but a version of that dance was still presented, but not to the right music! Surely if you are introducing children to the Sleeping Beauty ballet, the most famous dance of all should be represented with the right music which is so famous and so beautiful. Nothing nasty really happens, so Carabosse turns into a good fairy, and the kiss to wake Aurora up is turned into a hug. Oh well, nice for children to think the world is a happy place. The quality of the dancing did not overwhelm but the dancers deserve great credit for keeping their concentration through a noisy audience experience.
  14. Hello! Please excuse my english - it is not my native language. I don't know anything about ballet, but the other day I stumbled across some videos on youtube and somehow I got hooked. Especially this performance by Baryshnikov of the prince's variation in Sleeping Beauty. (I hope it is okay to post the video here...) Now I want to know what the steps are called and in which order he makes them... I googled a list of ballet steps and I think I recognize some, but I want to be sure. Could someone perhaps please help me? I'm rather curious about this performance. I also hope this was the right place/forum to post this question.
  15. If anyone is interested in seeing live the Australian Ballet's production of Ronald Hynd's The Merry Widow, it is part of their July 2019 appearance in Les Étés de la Danse at La Seine Musicale. Performance dates 10-13 July. From 3-6 July they will be performing David McAllister's production of The Sleeping Beauty.
  16. I was unable to be at the London Coliseum tonight for the first night of ENB's Sleeping Beauty (Kenneth MacMillan production), but I know a lot of forum members were, so I'm looking forward to hearing your thoughts! Our coverage of the previous run can be found here:
  17. It struck me this afternoon while watching English National Ballet's production of Sleeping Beauty that the UK is fortunate to have 3 very fine productions of The Sleeping Beauty, of similar provenance: Birmingham Royal Ballet's, English National Ballet and the Royal Ballet, all of which have been seen in various parts of the country in the past couple of years. Leaving aside the dancers in this case, what do you think are the good (and maybe bad) points of each production, and which do you rate the best?
  18. Principal casting for The Sleeping Beauty at the London Coliseum in June is now on the ENB Website https://www.ballet.org.uk/production/sleeping-beauty/#cast-section Wednesday 6 June, 7.30pm Alina Cojocaru* and Joseph Caley* Thursday 7 June, 2pm Erina Takahashi and Aitor Arrieta* Thursday 7 June, 7.30pm Maria Alexandrova*† and Aaron Robison* Friday 8 June, 7.30pm Alina Cojocaru and Joseph Caley Saturday 9 June, 2.30pm Jurgita Dronina* and Isaac Hernández* Saturday 9 June, 7.30pm Erina Takahashi and Aitor Arrieta Tuesday 12 June, 7.30pm Maria Alexandrova† and Aaron Robison Wednesday 13 June, 7.30pm Erina Takahashi and Aitor Arrieta Thursday 14 June, 2pm Alina Cojocaru and Joseph Caley Thursday 14 June, 7.30pm Jurgita Dronina and Isaac Hernández Friday 15 June, 7.30pm Maria Alexandrova† and Aaron Robison Saturday 16 June, 2.30pm Shiori Kase* and Cesar Corrales* Saturday 16 June, 7.30pm Jurgita Dronina and Isaac Hernández *Debut in role with English National Ballet †Guest Artist
  19. Use the promo code OLTENB onlineor call 020 7845 9300 and quote "Official London Theatre"£60.50 tickets now £46.50* £46.50 tickets now £31.50* Balcony tickets (normally £20.50 or £15.50) now £11.50*Valid for Tuesday – Thursday performances*Prices include booking fees
  20. Something to look forward to, depending of course on which cinemas are taking part: three Australian Ballet productions will be broadcast to 500 cinemas worldwide in October. The ballets are Ratmansky's redesigned Cinderella, David McAllister's jaw-droppingly lavish Sleeping Beauty and Peggy van Praagh's much-loved Coppelia. http://www.screendaily.com/news/cinemalive-partners-with-australian-ballet-on-trilogy-of-productions/5104519.article I'd happily pay to see all of them! I was on the verge of booking to see Cinderella at the London Coliseum next month when fate decreed that I'll be moving house on the only day I could have gone...
  21. If anyone went to see The Golden Age today and wants to discuss, please use this thread. Thanks.
  22. The line up for the Bolshoi cinema broadcasts is as follows 2016 16 October - The Golden Age 6 November - Bright Stream 18 December - Nutcracker 2017 22 January - Sleeping Beauty 5 February - Swan Lake 19 March - Contemporary Evening (Hans Van Manen (Frank Bridge Variation); Sol León & Paul Lightfoot (Short Time Together); Alexei Ratmansky (Russian Seasons)) 9 April - A Hero of Our Time Furtehr info http://www.pathelive.com/programme/the-bolshoi-ballet#programme
  23. Foteini Christofilopoulou was at the rehearsal for the Royal Ballet's 'The Sleeping Beauty', which opens at ROH on the 21st Dec. The photo call was of Sarah Lamb and Vadim Muntagirov in the Act 3 grand pdd. The performances opened now (from 21st Dec) Vadim Muntagirov, Sarah Lamb © Foteini Christofilopoulou. Courtesy of DanceTabs / Flickr Vadim Muntagirov, Sarah Lamb © Foteini Christofilopoulou. Courtesy of DanceTabs / Flickr See more... Set from DanceTabs: RB - The Sleeping Beauty (Act 3 gpdd) Courtesy of DanceTabs / Flickr By kind permission of the Royal Opera House
  24. Well, for anyone just back from the AB cinema broadcasts, here's your chance to discuss it. I wondered how Sleeping Beauty was going to come in at 2 1/2 hours - significant cuts to Acts II and III is the answer. The credits rolled through so quickly that I couldn't spot who all the dancers were, and there were no casts sheets: can anyone tell me who were Bluebird and Florine? I can probably guess if I go and haul this summer's programme out. And I'm guessing the fairy of musicality would have been the canary one?
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