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Found 18 results

  1. Just wondering if anyone has seen a special offer anywhere given that there are still hundreds of seats available?
  2. Natalia Osipova: Pure Dance. Opening Night, Tuesday 22nd Oct, 2019 As I walked along Rosebery Ave towards the Sadlers Wells main entrance, I saw a man sat on the steps of one of the adjacent terraced houses, engrossed in his phone. It was only David Hallberg! I couldn't resist interrupting to say hello and talk briefly about Manon, but at least I managed to stop myself asking for a photo! For an opening night featuring two world-famous classical dancers and two amazing contemporary dancers, the fact the auditorium only seemed about two-thirds full was a bit disappointing. Perhaps this was partly because the majority of the dance pieces were those from last year; there was one new piece (Left behind) and one that had been extended (Six Years Later). The Leaves are Fading (Antony Tudor). I've never seen the original, but the programme notes say this is an arrangement of the main PDD. It provided a wonderful introductory showpiece for the partnership of Osipova and Hallberg - that they have a definite affinity for each other was left in no doubt. Their billowing, pastel pink/white costumes added to sense of fluidity in their movements. Left behind: This was an intriguing piece, choreographed by Kittelberger and danced by him and Osipova. As a contemporary piece, he was dressed in a green shirt and trousers, she in black pants and a long brown t-shirt. The music was Rachmaninov's Elegie. The only prop on stage was a regular door, set in a frame, placed to the left of centre and at an angle. This formed a physical and metaphorical device to separate the dancers from each other but also allow them to join each other, for the piece (according to the programme) deals with the lingering impact of people that are no longer there (and relationships that are over?). The choreography played to their respective strengths; Kittelberger doing a fair amount of floor-level moves and partnering Osipova with total confidence (at one point she leapt from her perch on top of the door into his arms), and Osipova repeatedly crossing the contemporary boundary by throwing in her signature classical spins. Like much contemporary dance, there was a lot of latitude for interpretation. As such, I was quite engaged by it, but didn't get that much from it - though for the upcoming Friday and Saturday performances I'm fairly confident it will grow on me. That confidence didn't extend to the next piece, Flutter. I've seen it a number of times now, and I remain rather flummoxed by it. In trying to 'get' something from a piece, I need something to grab hold of to help extract some sort of meaning. The programme notes suggest Flutter is an exploration of the unknown; that's fine by me, but successful exploration of the unknown means it then becomes known - this piece just seemed to remain 'unknown' (to me, at least). This may well have been deliberate, in which case the piece does have a meaning/message - albeit a frustrating one - that it's hard to understand things that lack substance/structure, though it's something we still try to do (there! I've just tried to do that myself! QED!). The unstructured/insubstantial nature of the piece was reflected in the costumes, choreography and music. The costumes were white, gauze-like, almost transparent shirts and trousers; they were hardly there (underwear, thankfully, was). The choreography gave the impression of frenetic, ad hoc, 'half-moves'; the main 'structure' to the choreography was the use of the dimly-lit back of the stage to 'hide', followed by Osipova and Jonathan Goddard running to the brightly-lit front. The music was mainly based around the sung/spoken word - in this case 'random' numbers - along with synthesiser. Perhaps this is what Philip Glass' Knee Play 3 ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PL9Rjn7EiRw ) would sound like after taking LSD? Well, as has happened to me before, trying to explain something has helped me understand it! I now think the chaotic, fractured, insubstantial nature of the piece is what it's all about. I guess the clue was in the name all along; the piece flitters and flutters along, defying attempts to pin it down. In fact, just like a butterfly, pinning it down will ruin it. I will now go to the next performance armed with a different viewpoint! As an aside, it was great to see Jonathan Goddard on stage with Osipova again, but he has such a distinctive look that I couldn't help but think back to the 'ferryman' sequence in The Mother.😱 After the interval, Hallberg did his solo piece - In Absentia. The staging is minimal but superbly effective. He is sat on a chair to the left, looking at what seems to be a TV between him and us. The light from the TV bathes him and cast a huge shadow of him on the back wall of the stage. When he gets up and moves around the stage, exploring and testing various ballet moves, his shadow acts in concert - growing and shrinking according to where he is. I always thought the piece was about his enforced absence from the stage due to injury, with him passing the time (unsatisfactorily) by watching TV and trying to both remember and look forward to returning to the stage. The programme notes suggest not, but I like the poignancy of my interpretation, so I'm sticking to it! If I see him on the street on Friday I will ask him! This was followed by Six Years Later, danced by Osipova and Kittelberger to the Moonlight Sonata and the old pop song Reflections of My Life. I really liked this piece when I saw it last year. It's supposedly about the relationship between two people six years after some sort of 'event' in their lives. It's a puzzle-piece that has no answer, but it has enough substance to hook one's imagination into. I just loved the bit where, in time to the music, they are facing each other, very close together, moving alternate shoulders, 'hitting' each other as they move around the stage. Is it an argument? Is it playful? Who knows? And does it really matter? That ambiguity extends to another interaction where Kittelberger is stood back, facing off to Osipova, talking at her, a smile on his face. But was it friendly or taunting? What was he saying? (and, yes, he was actually speaking) The ending last year only added to the ambiguity, to the lack of resolution. There is a lyric in Reflections of My Life that goes 'Feel I'm dying'; last year at that point the lights went out, the music stopped and the piece was over - very effective. This year, the song continued until the end and the piece segued into a song by Handel. This was accompanied by slower, more intimate choreography (with a lot of intertwined hands/arms) until the finish. Personally, I liked the version that finished abruptly, but that might change with repeated viewing. The penultimate piece was Osipova's solo, Ave Maria. This ended the show last year, and is perhaps the most personal piece I have seen her do. I have never seen her give a performance of anything where she has not tried to be 100% honest with herself, the piece itself or the audience. Here, to use the old football cliche, she is 110% 'honest'. For me, that's what makes her the superlative dance-actress she is. The final piece was Valse Triste, choregraphed by Ratmansky and danced by Osipova and Hallberg. Putting this at the end instead of Ave Maria worked for me. Solo pieces are fine, but dance is at its best when it explores relationships. That she has special professional and personal relationships with the other three men in the show adds an extra dimension. To bookend the evening with Osipova/Hallberg pieces underlined the special relationship they have, and I was overjoyed not only by their wonderful timing/musicality, but also when he did a huge and prolonged lift of Osipova over his head towards the end of Valse Triste - the very lift he was having problems with recently. When Osipova, Hallberg, Kittelberger and Goddard appeared at the end of the evening, they appeared as friends who had spent the evening in the company of other friends - us, the audience, who rightly gave them a rapturous reception.
  3. Details are out now. Includes a new programme from Alina Cojocaru, new work from Crystal Pite, Ballet Boyz, final Richard Alston performances, new Khan for ENB, Northern Ballet, Rambert with DV8's Enter Achilles and lots more.
  4. I have booked tickets for the Ballet Cymru triple bill at the Lilian Baylis Studio, Sadler's Wells in November. I'm not familiar with the area and wondered if anyone could suggest somewhere decent, but not too pricey to eat before or after the performance. Also, I'll be staying in Bermondsey, any tips regarding public transport would be welcome. Thank you !
  5. I’ve just seen that the TodayTix App has a 24 hour offer of stalls and first circle tickets from £15 for all 3 Alvin Ailey programmes at Sadlers Wells for the rest of the run.
  6. Sadler's Wells Wednesday, May 29, 2019 – 7:30 pm Program A Shostakovich Trilogy Choreography: Alexei Ratmansky Music: Dmitri Shostakovich Conductor: Martin West Symphony #9 Jennifer Stahl, Aaron Robison Dores Andre, Joseph Walsh Wei Wang Chamber Symphony Ulrik Birkkjer Sasha De Sola Mathilde Froustey Yuan Yuan Tan Piano Concerto No. 1 Sofiane Sylve, Carlo Di Lanno Wona Park, Angelo Greco Learn More Buy Tickets Thursday, May 30, 2019 – 7:30 pm Program A Shostakovich Trilogy Choreography: Alexei Ratmansky Music: Dmitri Shostakovich Conductor: Martin West Symphony #9 Mathilde Froustey, Luke Ingham Sasha De Sola, Esteban Hernandez Hansuke Yamamoto Chamber Symphony Aaron Robison Jahna Frantziskonis Dores Andre Jennifer Stahl Piano Concerto No. 1 Yuan Yuan Tan, Tiit Helimets Isabella DeVivo, Vitor Luiz Learn More Buy Tickets Friday, May 31, 2019 – 7:30 pm Program B Conductor: Martin West The Infinite Ocean Choreography: Edwaard Liang Music: Oliver Davis Violinist: Cordula Merks Sofiane Sylve, Tiit Helimets Yuan Yuan Tan, Vitor Luiz Snowblind Choreography: Cathy Marston Music: Amy Beach, Philip Feeney, Arthur Foote, and Arvo Pärt Piano: Mungunchimeg Buriad Ethan Frome: Ulrik Birkkjaer Zeena Frome: Jennifer Stahl Mattie Silver: Mathilde Froustey Björk Ballet Choreography: Arthur Pita Music: Björk Gudmundsdottir, Alejandro Ghersi, and Sjón Carmela Mayo Dores Andre Elizabeth Powell Joseph Walsh Luke Ingham Ulrik Birkkjaer Learn More Buy Tickets Saturday, June 1, 2019 – 2:30 pm Program B The Infinite Ocean Choreography: Edwaard Liang Music: Oliver Davis Conductor: Martin West Violinist: Cordula Merks Sofiane Sylve, Tiit Helimets Yuan Yuan Tan, Vitor Luiz Snowblind Choreography: Cathy Marston Music: Amy Beach, Philip Feeney, Arthur Foote, and Arvo Pärt Conductor: Ming Luke Piano: Mungunchimeg Buriad Ethan Frome: Ulrik Birkkjaer Zeena Frome: Jennifer Stahl Mattie Silver: Mathilde Froustey Björk Ballet Choreography: Arthur Pita Music: Björk Gudmundsdottir, Alejandro Ghersi, and Sjón Conductor: Ming Luke Miranda Silveira Dores Andre Elizabeth Powell Joseph Walsh Luke Ingham Ulrik Birkkjaer Learn More Buy Tickets Saturday, June 1, 2019 – 7:30 pm Program B Conductor: Martin West The Infinite Ocean Choreography: Edwaard Liang Music: Oliver Davis Violinist: Cordula Merks Sofiane Sylve, Tiit Helimets Yuan Yuan Tan, Vitor Luiz Snowblind Choreography: Cathy Marston Music: Amy Beach, Philip Feeney, Arthur Foote, and Arvo Pärt Piano: Mungunchimeg Buriad Ethan Frome: Ulrik Birkkjaer Zeena Frome: Jennifer Stahl Mattie Silver: Mathilde Froustey Björk Ballet Choreography: Arthur Pita Music: Björk Gudmundsdottir, Alejandro Ghersi, and Sjón Carmela Mayo Dores Andre Elizabeth Powell Wei Wang Luke Ingham Ulrik Birkkjaer Learn More Buy Tickets Sunday, June 2, 2019 – 4:00 pm Program A Shostakovich Trilogy Choreography: Alexei Ratmansky Music: Dmitri Shostakovich Conductor: Martin West Symphony #9 Jennifer Stahl, Aaron Robison Dores Andre, Max Cauthorn Lonnie Weeks Chamber Symphony Joseph Walsh Isabella DeVivo Elizabeth Powell Sasha De Sola Piano Concerto No. 1 WanTing Zhao, Vladislav Kozlov Wona Park, Angelo Greco Learn More Buy Tickets Wednesday, June 5, 2019 – 7:30 pm Program C Bespoke Choreography: Stanton Welch Music: J.S. Bach Conductor: Martin West Violinist: Cordula Merks Mathilde Froustey, Sasha De Sola, Jennifer Stahl Wona Park, Isabella DeVivo, Ellen Rose Hummel Angelo Greco, Carlo Di Lanno, Jaime Garcia Castilla Esteban Hernandez, Alexandre Cagnat, Lonnie Weeks Hummingbird Choreography: Liam Scarlett Music: Philip Glass Conductor: Martin West Piano: Natasha Feygina Sasha De Sola, Angelo Greco Yuan Yuan Tan, Luke Ingham Dores Andre, Joseph Walsh Hurry Up, We're Dreaming Choreography: Justin Peck Music: M83 Dores Andre, Joseph Walsh Elizabeth Powell, Luke Ingham Gabriela Gonzalez, Ulrik Birkkjaer Learn More Buy Tickets Thursday, June 6, 2019 – 7:30 pm Program D Your Flesh Shall Be a Great Poem Choreography: Trey McIntyre Music: Chris Garneau Benjamin Freemantle Isabella DeVivo, Sasha De Sola, Jennifer Stahl Steven Morse, Jaime Garcia Castilla, Alexandre Cagnat, Esteban Hernandez, Lonnie Weeks Bound To Choreography: Christopher Wheeldon Music: Keaton Henson Conductor: Martin West Dores Andre, Jennifer Stahl, Yuan Yuan Tan, Sasha De Sola, Isabella DeVivo Jaime Garcia Castilla, Lonnie Weeks, Carlo Di Lanno, Angelo Greco, Benjamin Freemantle Anima Animus Choreography: David Dawson Music: Ezio Bosso Conductor: Martin West Violinist: Cordula Merks Wona Park, Sofiane Sylve Joseph Walsh, Carlo Di Lanno, Luke Ingham, Wei Wang Elizabeth Powell, Skyla Schreter, Kamryn Baldwin, Elizabeth Mateer Learn More Buy Tickets Friday, June 7, 2019 – 7:30 pm Program D Your Flesh Shall Be a Great Poem Choreography: Trey McIntyre Music: Chris Garneau Benjamin Freemantle Isabella DeVivo, Sasha De Sola, Jennifer Stahl Steven Morse, Jaime Garcia Castilla, Alexandre Cagnat, Esteban Hernandez, Lonnie Weeks Bound To Choreography: Christopher Wheeldon Music: Keaton Henson Conductor: Martin West Dores Andre, Jennifer Stahl, Yuan Yuan Tan, Sasha De Sola, Isabella DeVivo Jaime Garcia Castilla, Lonnie Weeks, Carlo Di Lanno, Angelo Greco, Benjamin Freemantle Anima Animus Choreography: David Dawson Music: Ezio Bosso Conductor: Martin West Violinist: Cordula Merks Wona Park, Sofiane Sylve Joseph Walsh, Carlo Di Lanno, Luke Ingham, Wei Wang Elizabeth Powell, Skyla Schreter, Kamryn Baldwin, Elizabeth Mateer Learn More Buy Tickets Saturday, June 8, 2019 – 2:00 pm Program C Bespoke Choreography: Stanton Welch Music: J.S. Bach Conductor: Ming Luke Violinist: Cordula Merks WanTing Zhao, Sasha De Sola, Jennifer Stahl Wona Park, Thamires Chuvas, Ellen Rose Hummel Esteban Hernandez, Steven Morse, Jaime Garcia Castilla Wei Wang, Alexandre Cagnat, Lonnie Weeks Hummingbird Choreography: Liam Scarlett Music: Philip Glass Conductor: Ming Luke Piano: Natasha Feygina Jasmine Jimison, Steven Morse Lauren Strongin,Vitor Luiz Isabella DeVivo, Jaime Garcia Castilla Hurry Up, We're Dreaming Choreography: Justin Peck Music: M83 Ellen Rose Hummel, Wei Wang Isabella DeVivo, Henry Sidford Norika Matsuyama, Hansuke Yamamoto Learn More Buy Tickets Saturday, June 8, 2019 – 7:30 pm Program C Bespoke Choreography: Stanton Welch Music: J.S. Bach Conductor: Ming Luke Violinist: Cordula Merks Mathilde Froustey, Sasha De Sola, Jennifer Stahl Wona Park, Isabella DeVivo, Ellen Rose Hummel Angelo Greco, Carlo Di Lanno, Jaime Garcia Castilla Esteban Hernandez, Alexandre Cagnat, Lonnie Weeks Hummingbird Choreography: Liam Scarlett Music: Philip Glass Conductor: Ming Luke Piano: Natasha Feygina Sasha De Sola, Angelo Greco Yuan Yuan Tan, Luke Ingham Dores Andre, Joseph Walsh Hurry Up, We're Dreaming Choreography: Justin Peck Music: M83 Dores Andre, Joseph Walsh Elizabeth Powell, Luke Ingham Gabriela Gonzalez, Ulrik Birkkjaer
  7. As well as San Francisco Ballet, lots of other ballet and dance performances for Spring 2019 have been announced by Sadler's Wells: http://newseason.sadlerswells.com/?utm_source=wordfly&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=MKTEB181016&utm_content=version_A&sourceNumber=2560
  8. Casting is now up on the BRB website for the performances of La Fille Mal Gardée (November 1 - 3) https://www.brb.org.uk/whats-on/event/la-fille-mal-gardee#dates-and-times I've listed the casts below in the following order: Lise; Colas; Widow Simone; Alain Thursday Nov 1: Momoko Hirata; Mathias Dingman; Michael O'Hare; James Barton Friday Nov 2: Samara Downs; Yasuo Atsuji; Kit Holder; Tzu-Chao Chou Saturday Nov 3 (Mat: Maureya Lebowitz; César Morales; James Barton; AitorGalende Saturday Nov 3 (eve) Céline Gittens; Tyrone Singleton; Rory Mackay; Kit Holder
  9. Casting is now up for BRB's Romeo and Juliet at Sadler's Wells next week https://www.brb.org.uk/whats-on/venue/sadlers-wells Tuesday June 12 Juliet Momoko Hirata Romeo César Morales Mercutio Tzu-Chao Chou Tybalt Rory Mackay Benvolio Yasuo Atsuji Wednesday June 13 mat Juliet Nao Sakuma Romeo Chi Cao Mercutio Lachlan Monaghan Tybalt Valentin Olovyannikov Benvolio Edivaldo Souza da Silva Wednesday June 13 eve Juliet Jenna Roberts Romeo Tyrone Singleton Mercutio Max Maslen Tybalt Yasuo Atsuji Benvolio Brandon Lawrence
  10. Casting just announced: https://www.ballet.org.uk/production/voices-of-america/#cast-section
  11. This has been going on for a while already, apparently, but just be aware that buses to Sadler's Wells from Islington are on diversion: https://tfl.gov.uk/status-updates/major-works-and-events/upper-street-works?cid=upper-street-works That means that you can't hop on one outside Angel tube, and nor can you pick up a southbound one outside the theatre at the moment.
  12. Birmingham Royal Ballet and Sadler's Wells are joining forces for a major new development programme for classical choreographers. The scheme will support large-scale commissions by emerging choreographers as well as offer mentoring from major ballet companies. Ballet Now is specifically for choreographers who have taken a classical route but have not had the opportunity to work on the largest scale. It will also work with composers and designers. The programme is being funded by £1.1 million from Oak Foundation, with BRB looking to match fund the same amount again. Ballet Now will support two commissions each year, helping a total of six artists – one choreographer, composer and designer for each commission. They will create work that will premiere at either BRB or Sadler's Wells in London. BRB currently performs at Sadler's Wells for one week a year, but this will be doubled to accommodate the commissions created for Ballet Now. The programme will also offer the selected artists mentoring from BRB director David Bintley and the company’s music director Koen Kessels. Bintley, who is behind the plans, said the idea had come from a realisation that there is choreographic talent being nurtured through a classical background that is not being used. "If you work in a classical vein it is very hard, if you are not permanently allied with a company, to get work,” he said. Sadler's Wells artistic director Alistair Spalding added: "There seems to be an issue particularly with the development of new talent coming from ballet itself. There is a big trend for contemporary choreographers to go into the ballet situation, and this is trying to address the fact that it needs to also come through ballet itself." The programme will also have an international element, with BRB partnering with ballet companies across the globe to seek out the talent chosen for Ballet Now. This process will be overseen by a creative consortium, made up of experts from across world ballet. They will also provide mentoring opportunities for the selected artists. The programme begins later this year and is planned to run over five years, allowing the work created by Ballet Now to become the "artistic calling cards" needed to forge careers around the world. Bintley went on to describe international collaboration as "very much the way forward" for ballet companies such as BRB, adding that it would be an important element of ballet's future. The creative consortium met for the first time on April 27. https://www.brb.org.uk/post/ballet-now
  13. Scottish Ballet also start a brief run of their new A Streetcar Named Desire at Sadler's Wells tonight, so please use this thread for discussion. BTW, does anyone know the running time? The SW website is unhelpful in that respect.
  14. Sadler's Wells staged their annual Press Conference this morning, with lots of live Tweeting from Bruce Marriott and Graham Watts. By far the most significant announcement is that ENB will become the theatre's first Associate Company. ENB have released the following: http://blog.ballet.org.uk/sadlerswells-englishnationalballet-newrelationshipandwork/ And the Standard's Lyndsey Winship has been quick off the mark: http://www.standard.co.uk/goingout/theatre/dances-new-double-act-sadlers-wells-and-english-national-ballet-form-new-partnership-9837741.html Not yet the end of performing at the Coliseum for ENB, it seems, but an interesting development in light of earlier discussions here about that relationship and its longer term viability. And the prospect of a new Giselle for the Company from Akram Khan is tantalising.
  15. A Sadler’s Wells Production Sylvie Guillem & Russell Maliphant PUSH LONDON COLISEUM Tuesday 29 July - Sunday 3 August Performances: Tue, Wed, Fri & Sat at 7.30pm, Sun at 2.30pm. No performance Thur Tickets: £12- £90 Ticket Office: 0844 412 4300 or www.sadlerswells.com After sell-out seasons around the world, Sadler’s Wells’ critically acclaimed production PUSH returns to the London Coliseum from 29 July - 3 August 2014, featuring Sadler’s Wells Associate Artists Sylvie Guillem and Russell Maliphant. PUSH showcases four works choreographed by Maliphant and is made up of solos and duets performed by Maliphant and Guillem, who first collaborated in 2003 with Broken Fall. Two and Solo are dazzling solos performed by Guillem; Push is a duet for Guillem and Maliphant; and Shift is Maliphant’s seminal 1996 solo. The works are complemented by stunning lighting by Olivier Award-winning lighting designer and Sadler’s Wells Associate Artist Michael Hulls, and accompanied by music from Andy Cowton, Carlos Montoya and Shirley Thompson. Since its debut in 2005, PUSH has received four major awards: an Olivier Award, a Time Out Award, Best Choreography (Modern) at the National Dance Awards and the South Bank Show Dance Award. Sylvie Guillem was born in Paris and trained in gymnastics under the instruction of her mother, a gymnastics teacher. In 1977 she began training at the Paris Opera Ballet School, and in 1981 joined the company's corps de ballet. She was promoted to the rank of "Etoile" by Rudolf Nureyev at the age of 19. Guillem has performed all the leading roles of the classical repertoire with the world's leading companies including the Royal Ballet, Paris Opera Ballet, Kirov, Tokyo Ballet, Australian Ballet, American Ballet Theatre and La Scala. Guillem’s awards include the Officier de la Légion d’Honneur, Officier dans l’Ordre National du Mérite, Officier des Arts et Lettres, and, in Britain, an honorary CBE. Russell Maliphant trained at The Royal Ballet School and graduated into Sadler’s Wells Royal Ballet before leaving to pursue a career in independent dance. He danced with DV8, Michael Clark, Rosemary Butcher and Laurie Booth. He formed his Company in 1996. He has also collaborated with renowned companies and artists including Robert Lepage, Isaac Julian, Balletboyz and Lyon Opera Ballet. In 2011 Maliphant was awarded an honorary doctorate of arts from Plymouth University. He became an Associate Artist of Sadler’s Wells in 2005. Maliphant’s most recent Sadler’s Wells production, Still Current, is touring internationally.
  16. Part of Sadler’s Wells’ series =dance Stopgap Dance Company Artificial Things Lilian Baylis Studio, Sadler’s Wells Tuesday 13 & Wednesday 14 May 2014 Performances at 7.45pm Tickets: £6 - £12 Ticket Office 0844 412 4300 or www.sadlerswells.com Minicom Number: 020 7863 8015 “Stopgap Dance Company is a deeply felt affirmation of dance” Sunday Express Next month, Sadler’s Wells presents the start of =dance, a new series featuring some of the most exciting and innovative work created and performed by deaf and disabled artists. Presenting work by both established and emerging inclusive dance companies, =dance also includes a programme of workshops, discussions and professional development opportunities alongside each performance. The series runs from May 2014 - March 2015 in the biggest presentation of inclusive dance ever programmed by the theatre. The first company to present work in =dance is Stopgap Dance Company. Made up of disabled and non-disabled dancers, Stopgap performs the London premiere of its latest work Artificial Things, following a critically acclaimed UK and European tour, on Tuesday 13 and Wednesday 14 May 2014. Artificial Things looks at five individuals who are slowly suffocating in each other’s company. They seek escape through riotous rock-n-roll, but their wild disorder descends into playground politics to reveal some uncomfortable truths. This bold and evocative production comes in three contrasting sections, with each piece examining our attempts to live with one another. Artificial Things is the debut production by Stopgap’s new Artistic Director Lucy Bennett, whose reputation is growing as a leading expert in integrated choreography. Since her appointment in 2012, Stopgap ceased being a repertoire company and began devising original productions as an ensemble. Artificial Things has a cast including dancer David Toole, whose prominent solo in the London 2012 Paralympics Opening Ceremony marked a historic moment for dance and disability. The cast also includes dancers Chris Pavia, Laura Jones, Amy Butler and David Willdridge. Under Bennett’s direction, they have devised a poignant production that connects with the widest possible audience, shifting perceptions about integrated dance. Stopgap Dance Company runs its Responsive dance practice and integrated choreography workshop on Wednesday 14 May 2014 from 11am - 5.45pm. This day long intensive workshop aimed at professional dancers and teachers offers a chance to experience, reflect and discuss creative dance for mixed ability groups. Lucy Bennett, Artistic Director of Stopgap Dance Company says “We are thrilled to be presenting Artificial Things as part of =dance. The production has some of the best disabled and non-disabled dance artists who have a deep understanding of working together. We have combined experience of over 60 years in integrated dance, and our devising process has raised many new questions about dance and inclusion both artistically and technically. We spent much of the last two years consolidating our practice from a repertoire company into one that makes original productions. Artificial Things is the end result of our efforts so far.” Notes to Editors: =dance listings information: Stopgap Dance Company Artificial Things Tuesday 13 & Wednesday 14 May 2014 Performances at 7.45pm Tickets: £12 (£6 conc) Workshop on Wednesday 14 May from 11am - 5.45pm; Tickets: £20; suitable for professional dancers and teachers DMD+ Hear! Hear! Sunday 28 September 2014 Performance at 5pm Tickets: £12 (£6 conc) BSL interpreted post show talk Workshop on Sunday 28 September from 2pm - 3.30pm; Tickets £4; suitable for young deaf people aged 12 - 25 Candoco Dance Company Curious Encounters Sunday 16 November 2014 Performance at 3pm Tickets: £6 Workshop on Sunday 16 November from 4.30pm – 6pm; Tickets £10 (including ticket for the performance); suitable for disabled and non-disabled dancers aged 13+ BSL Interpreted Candoco Dance Company Close Encounters Monday 17 November 2014 Performance at 7pm Tickets: £12 (£6 conc) Free pre-show dress rehearsal and discussion for ticket holders BSL Interpreted =dance Statement Pieces Thursday 11 December 2014 Performance at 7.45pm Tickets: £12 (£6 conc) Free BSL interpreted post-show discussion for ticket holders Magpie Dance Flying High Friday 16 January 2015 Performance at 7.15pm Tickets: £12 (£6 conc) Workshop on Friday 16 January from 3.45pm - 5.45pm; tickets £4 suitable for aspiring dancers with learning disabilities aged 18 - 30 Lilian Baylis Studio, Sadler’s Wells Ticket Office 0844 412 4300 or www.sadlerswells.com Minicom number: 020 7863 8015 The inaugural =dance series continues with further productions, workshops, debates and discussions until March 2015, with further details to be announced shortly. About Sadler’s Wells Access Scheme Sadler’s Wells runs an Access for All Register for people with physical, sensory or cognitive disabilities. Patrons can apply to the scheme, which enables them to use our new online disabled booking service and free access to the theatre car park. They may also be entitled to concessionary tickets if they are in receipt of disability-related state benefits. The scheme entitles a reduction in the cost of their ticket and a companions ticket, limited to one per production and a reduced booking fee. For more information on the Access Scheme and to apply please visit the Sadler’s Wells website: http://www.sadlerswells.com/page/access-scheme About Sadler’s Wells Sadler's Wells is a world leader in contemporary dance, committed to producing, commissioning and presenting new works and to bringing the very best international and UK dance to London audiences. Under the Artistic Directorship of Alistair Spalding the theatre’s acclaimed year-round programme spans dance of every kind, from contemporary to flamenco, bollywood to ballet, salsa to street dance and tango to tap. Since 2005 it has helped to bring over 80 new dance works to the stage and its international award-winning commissions and collaborative productions regularly tour the world, including Sutra, zero degrees, and PUSH. Sadler’s Wells also provides a home to 16 world class Associate Artists and 3 Resident Companies including Sylvie Guillem, Akram Khan, Hofesh Shechter, Crystal Pite, Wayne McGregor | Random Dance, Matthew Bourne’s New Adventures and ZooNation. The theatre also supports and nurtures the next generation of talent through its National Youth Dance Company, Summer University programme, Wild Card initiative and its New Wave Associates. Located in Islington in north London, the current theatre is the sixth to have stood on the site since it was first built by Richard Sadler in 1683. The venue has played an illustrious role in the history of theatre ever since with The Royal Ballet, Birmingham Royal Ballet and English National Opera all having started at Sadler’s Wells. About Stopgap Dance Company Stopgap Dance Company creates exhilarating dance productions of international standard. It employs disabled and non-disabled artists who find innovative ways to collaborate. Stopgap values a pioneering spirit and is committed to making discoveries about integrating disabled and non-disabled people through dance. “Difference is our means and our method” As a charitable organisation Stopgap openly shares skills and knowledge through performance, professional training, community outreach and publications. It creates works for the widest possible audience to shift perceptions about difference and inspire everyone to achieve their potential. Stopgap is a British company and works in partnership with Arts Council England as a National Portfolio Organisation. It is a resident company of Farnham Maltings, The University of Surrey and an associate artist of Zinc Arts. About Lucy Bennett Lucy graduated from Doreen Bird College with a first class degree in Dance and Theatre Performance. Immersed in Stopgap’s work for ten years as a dancer and choreographer, Lucy closely observed the dynamic interaction of distinctly different dancers. Choreographing with these dancers has shaped Lucy’s artistic practice, which is to encapsulate and express remarkable human stories through dance. As the resident choreographer and since 2012, the Artistic Director of the company, Lucy takes leadership over creative processes and is developing Stopgap into a company that can conceive original ideas. In recent years she has choreographed: Chris et Lucy (2007); Tracking commissioned by Without Walls consortium, Shape Arts and Liberty Festival (2009); Extra Ordinary, Guest Choreographer for David Toole and Lucy Hind (2010); and SPUN Productions, commissioned for the Cultural Olympiad (2012).
  17. The Mark Morris Dance Group is at Sadler's Wells for a short season of two programmes this week: please post about performances here. I've had emails from Sadler's Wells giving what appears to be very short running times for each bill: my guess is that intervals may not have been included, as with Stuttgart Ballet last week.
  18. 13 Mar 2012 – 15 Mar 2012 Now with Putrov and Polunin joint-headlining, and a different cast and programme http://www.sadlerswe...n-Men-in-Motion Lifted straight from the website: "Following the sell-out run of Ivan Putrov’s Men in Motion earlier this year, the former Royal Ballet Principal returns to Sadler’s Wells with an evening of works showcasing the athleticism and beauty of the male form in motion. For this exciting programme Putrov will be joined by some of the world’s finest dancers including Sergei Polunin (former Royal Ballet Principal), Tim Matiakis (Royal Ballet of Denmark), Clyde Archer and Isaac Montllor (Spain's Compañía Nacional de Danza). The evening will include Nacho Duato’s modern trio Remanso and a new piece choreographed by Polunin himself. Also on the bill will be Leon Jacobson’s Vestris – a solo originally choreographed in 1969 for a young Mikhail Baryshnikov after he won the International Ballet Competition in Moscow. Other highlights include one of the most famous works ever created for the male dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky’s L'après-midi d'un faune set to Debussy’s beautiful music." (which involves half-a-dozen women, or should do, of course) Edit: clashes with BRB at the Coliseum, but coincides with a couple of "dead" nights at the ROH.
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