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Miko Fogarty

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I think she is studying medicine.

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I'm not sure whether on this thread or on another related thread but I posted about Miko not dancing professionally any more and taking up studies to be a Doctor some months ago. However I am assuming it's to be a Medical  Doctor as just the word Doctor was mentioned and used on its own usually means Medicine!! She must have been doing this for at least a year now but have no idea how it's all going for her...as I'm not on Instagram or Twitter so have no idea what is going on in those worlds!! 

 

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Just checked her LinkedIn profile and it says she is an undergrad pre-med student at Berkeley:

Miko F.png

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Many thanks for the info Cara!

She also still has a toe  in Ballet!! She is teaching this coming August...2018...tips on technique and learning some of her variations under the San Jose Ballet International although one of the days seems to be near San Francisco. So is obviously keeping it up in some form!!

 

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21 hours ago, LinMM said:

Many thanks for the info Cara!

She also still has a toe  in Ballet!! She is teaching this coming August...2018...tips on technique and learning some of her variations under the San Jose Ballet International although one of the days seems to be near San Francisco. So is obviously keeping it up in some form!!

 

I see she's actually listed as the Conservatory Director of Dance International San Jose, where she's giving the Masterclasses. See: https://www.sjdanceinternational.org/ It says in her bio that "She started teaching in 2016 and has held workshops in Thailand, Japan, and Australia" and she's also offering private lessons. 

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I think this really shows that those young trainees who work intensely from a young age, dancing in local galas here and there and taking part in national/international competitions, aren't mentally well prepared by the time they are of an age to join a professional company. They grow up believing they are already stars but once they join a company they are "nobody", they have to start out as a corps de ballet dancer, they are not used to dancing and rehearsing in a group and to not getting individual attention and adoration.There must be an element of burn out too as they seem to lack the immense drive needed to climb up through the ranks.

 

It must have been psychologically very difficult for the young lady mentioned here above, to have to be "one of many" in the BRB corps de ballet (having grown up believing she was a star, with many praising her on social media). From what I have read the same happened to  Australian Claudia Dean: she was individually trained and coached to dance solos at galas and at competitions, but when it came to thriving as a professional dancer in the RB corps de ballet she couldn't mentally adapt to dancing just corps roles, she wasn't mentally prepared to do her time in the corps. As a corps de ballet dancer she got a few solo roles as a test, and I think it must have posed a problem for her to accept that one day she could dance a solo role but on other days she had to return to being a corps de ballet dancer, as that was her rank after all, she wasn't a soloist. When she didn't get the promotion she thought she deserved she gave up. Surely there must have been other reasons why both young ladies stopped being a corps de ballet dancer.

 

This raises the question: what IS needed for a dancer to be able to climb up from being a corps de ballet dancer to becoming a soloist to ultimately - for the rare and highly exceptional dancer - becoming a Principal? Intensive early training, winning competitions and dancing solos at a young age doesn't prepare a young trainee for the physical and mental rigours of professional life as a successful dancer. 

 

Clearly, talent alone is not enough. 

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Xandra Newman said:

this really shows that those young trainees who work intensely from a young age, dancing in local galas here and there and taking part in national/international competitions, aren't mentally well prepared by the time they are of an age to join a professional company

 

I'd say we should be very careful to make any assumptions - particularly when there's the implication that somehow these young people are morally failing. Maybe Ms Fogarty simply burnt out? Maybe she had a change of heart? Maybe there is an injury she just doesn't want to speak about publicly? 

 

You might look at the career of Daniil Simkin - he was 'hothoused' in a similar way as Ms Fogarty, and dances with ABT, and is just going to the Berliner Staatsoper. 

 

Edited by Kate_N
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There must be an attraction from Ballererinas to swap thier tutu's for their white coats.

Another dancer that I know still occasionally returns to the studio to teach ballet whilst balancing studies in her 2yr at Medical school.

She's in her early 30's having graduated from RBS and then performed professioanlly for about 8yrs before changing career. 

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9 hours ago, Xandra Newman said:

 

 

 From what I have read the same happened to  Australian Claudia Dean: she was individually trained and coached to dance solos at galas and at competitions, but when it came to thriving as a professional dancer in the RB corps de ballet she couldn't mentally adapt to dancing just corps roles, she wasn't mentally prepared to do her time in the corps. As a corps de ballet dancer she got a few solo roles as a test, and I think it must have posed a problem for her to accept that one day she could dance a solo role but on other days she had to return to being a corps de ballet dancer, as that was her rank after all, she wasn't a soloist. When she didn't get the promotion she thought she deserved she gave up. 

 

Claudia Dean trained at RBS from the age of  15 -17 1/2  before entering into the RB Company. I believe that her decision to leave was in no way associated with her position in the company. She took the brave step, after the realisation that company life was not the life she wanted, of leaving and returning to her native Australia. She has found her calling in life in training the next generation dancers - she is generous with her time and experience in encouraging these young girls. I for one find her a breath of fresh air and would like to applaud her.

9 hours ago, Xandra Newman said:

 

 

 

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57 minutes ago, balletbean said:

There must be an attraction from Ballererinas to swap thier tutu's for their white coats.

Another dancer that I know still occasionally returns to the studio to teach ballet whilst balancing studies in her 2yr at Medical school.

She's in her early 30's having graduated from RBS and then performed professioanlly for about 8yrs before changing career. 

Yes it's interesting. I know of a few doctors who have danced professionally/been vocational ballet students including one who is training as a maxillo-facial surgeon, which is probably one of the hardest fields to tackle as you have to be dual qualified in dentistry and medicine before you even really start. We often say on here that dance training equips young people with lots of transferable skills even if a dance career doesn't pan out - tenacity and a great work ethic are certainly amongst them, which is obviously very good.

I do wonder though if ex dancers somehow "need" pressure as they have become used to it. It does seem quite common that they opt for other difficult paths on leaving the dance world.

 

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I think Claudia Dean in interviews I've seen had several reasons for wanting to return to Oz but one of them was definitely not getting that promotion. 

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Concerning Fogarty remember her mother in the movie First position...  The ballet mum cliché !  Awfully ambitious for her daughter, terrible result at the end !

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Well Miko has been very successful dance wise when you consider all the girls who don't make it at all!

so not a terrible result really.

Also she is now not only successfully pursuing another career but  still maintains contact with ballet in the way that she chooses too and now enjoys teaching. 

Overall she has done well in her life even if not a principal dancer with a Company.

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2 minutes ago, LinMM said:

Well Miko has been very successful dance wise when you consider all the girls who don't make it at all!

so not a terrible result really.

Also she is now not only successfully pursuing another career but  still maintains contact with ballet in the way that she chooses too and now enjoys teaching. 

Overall she has done well in her life even if not a principal dancer with a Company.

The life she wants ... BRAVO!!

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much ado about nothing to my eyes !

the life she wants yes, that's wonderful...

but was it really necessary to work so hard all those years to finally figure out it is not for you ?

no if you are well guided...

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I think it is very brave for someone who has had so much exposure as Miko to basically say "you know what, this isn't what I want to do". I think it's hard enough for a "regular" dance student or professional to change direction. They have put so much of themselves into it, know that others, particularly parents, have also made sacrifices, and often they haven't really considered other options or had a huge amount of exposure to alternative careers as they've grown up. So it's a step into the unknown which must be very scary. For someone like Miko who has had all that and more it must be even worse. I don't imagine it was an easy decision for her and I think it's admirable that she has chosen another path that will hopefully bring her fulfillment and happiness. 

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Posted (edited)

If you devote yourself to something at a young age , experience success and disapointments and then quit it in your 20's

I don't call that a failure.  I call that the Olympics!

 

Company life is not for Miko and so she has moved on.  Some will suck it up for years.  Others leave. 

The only lesson for me is - don't mortgage your house paying for this!

 

I expect Miko and Claudia Dean are very ambitious, driven people.  They make a decision about what they want in their lives and show that they can work for many years trying to achieve it.  

 

12 hours ago, Xandra Newman said:

Intensive early training, winning competitions and dancing solos at a young age doesn't prepare a young trainee for the physical and mental rigours of professional life as a successful dancer. 

 

I don't see it as a lack of 'mental rigour' when they choose not to do years in the Corp.   It will probably be harder and harder for the kind of dancer who can get into a ballet company to then enjoy being one of the corps of swans standing quite still for many minutes in Swan Lake.  As discussed ten years ago in the article: Often a Swan, Rarely a Queen

https://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/16/arts/dance/16sulc.html

 

Edited by DD Driver
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I've been reading this thread with interest, as Claudia Dean is very much 'flavour of the month' here in New Zealand, and parents of talented young dancers have been flying to Australia to do workshops with her (as well as begging her to come to NZ). She also appears to have a line of dancewear, as several young NZ dancers at the Asian Grand Prix tagged her in photos of them wearing her leotards to class. I've watched some of her YouTube videos, including the one about why she left the RB, and found her very personable and likeable.

But I don't think there is any comparison really with Miko. My son works in Korea, and says that there and in Japan it's quite normal for kids to go to one 'academy' after the other as soon as school finishes every day, to study English or ballet or gymnastics or a musical instrument. So I think Miko's mother would be considered favourably in those societies and it's just our Western opinion of 'Asian tiger mothers' that influences how we feel. Miko says she lost the passion, and seems to have found a new one. As my DD has also lost her passion and wants to study medicine, I think she's made a brave decision after investing so much in ballet.

Claudia seems to me quite a different kettle of fish, who is using her valuable dance experience to build a new 'empire'. She is obviously building her 'brand' successfully, and is gathering a good following of young dancers keen to benefit from her recent experience in the ballet world.

 

I'm not critical of either young woman. You take the good things ballet has taught you, and hopefully learn to deal with the not-so-good aspects. I say good for them both for starting a new path!

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3 hours ago, MAX said:

much ado about nothing to my eyes !

the life she wants yes, that's wonderful...

but was it really necessary to work so hard all those years to finally figure out it is not for you ?

no if you are well guided...

 

How dreadfully cynical.  Most people work hard for many years no matter what their sphere of life.  I’ve met many people over the years who have realised sooner or later that the path they chose at one or more points in their life has become a path they have no longer wanted to follow and have changed their direction.  I say good on them for having the courage of their convictions to change path.

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I don't think it's particularly surprising that the things you thought you wanted at 13 aren't necessarily what you want when you're 18. People change. Circumstances change. When I was 14 I wanted to be a pilot! I loved to fly and thought nothing could be better than doing that every day. As I got older and pursued my dream, I realised that the realities of a career in that industry just didn't suit me. I still love to fly and it's a great hobby to have, but I don't want a career in it because the idea of flying the same 3 hour route twice a day, every day for 5 years does not epitomise what I love about flying. Does that mean the time and money I spent between 14 and 17 was wasted? Absolutely not. It just wasn't the career for me.

 

It's the same with ballet. I love class, but I can't imagine any career worse than a classical ballet career! I think it's important to teach kids that just because you love something, doesn't mean it has to be your job... And that if you make the choice to pursue it as a career, and decide that after experiencing it it actually isn't for you, then that's okay. It's not because you're not tough enough, or unprepared for the mental rigours of the job, it's just not the right path for you. Dancing occasionally, teaching ballet, or packing it in completely doesn't make you a failure, it makes you someone who...isn't a professional dancer. Like the vast majority of people who take a ballet class in their life! We are the 99% 😝

 

Now, I do believe that hothousing, home schooling, 40 hour a week training and attending every international ballet competition under the sun is incredibly damaging and should be discouraged. I believe that physically and mentally you are setting these kids up to fail in a way. Life is about balance. But just because someone pursues ballet as a career and then changes their mind doesn't mean that there is some inherent failing in them, and I think we have to be very careful of the language we use to describe the people who have left ballet behind, for whatever reason.

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Posted (edited)

Embrace failure, it can be life's best guide

 

This article appeared in yesterday's Times, mainly prompted by Thursday's A level results.  It is an excellent read. Matthew Parris writes about his false starts in careers, and how finding out what hasn't worked clears the way for you to find the path that is right for you. 

Edited by Jan McNulty
Link - edited by JMcN to improve link
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Nothing in life is a failure, it’s just a step on the path of success - your own personal success.  Far too much judgement of others in this world at the moment.  To suggest either failed is ridiculous. Getting into a professional ballet company, let alone 2 of the very best in the world, is only open to about 0.01% of the population (goodness knows really, but it’s incredibly small).

 

Claudia is her own boss, using her wonderful talent to help others, probably very happy to be back in her own country with family and friends and I’m sure earning more money and working when she wants to, away from the daily bitchiness and competition that is inevitable in a highly competitive ballet company.,  As for Miko, clearly a very clever lady and what an amazing thing to be a doctor! 

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I believe I read somewhere that Claudia’s mother became seriously ill and as they had spent years apart and her mother had worked hard to help fund her, Claudia wanted to give something back. As for Miko, it must have taken considerable courage for her to step off the merry go round especially given her mother’s drive to make her a professional dancer.

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The title of the article was referring to particular exam results and is really just to grab attention. The rest of the article goes on to make that point Harwell.

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2 hours ago, Pas de Quatre said:

Embrace failure, it can be life's best guide

 

This article appeared in yesterday's Times, mainly prompted by Thursday's A level results.  It is an excellent read. Matthew Parris writes about his false starts in careers, and how finding out what hasn't worked clears the way for you to find the path that is right for you. 

 

A very great read, the basis of which could be life's mantra.  Thanks for the link PDQ.

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Samuel Beckett: "Fail again. Fail better."

 

I do think some of the speculation and critique here is quite inappropriately personal. We really don't know what goes on in other people's lives. What if Ms Fogarty or Ms Dean were to read some of these posts?

 

And I suggest again people look at the training of Daniil Simkin - similarly hothoused & danced in many competition, now enjoying a rich and fulfilling artistic life working between 2 of the world's best companies.

 

These are dual choices and I think it's difficult to draw broader conclusions about training from them.

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And don't forget Miko had two parents!! Yes Mum was ambitious for her girl and boy to be successful dancers ( it could have been something else) and initially both of them loved it.....so no problem.....it's very difficult to force children to do something they hate!!  But the dad in that film came across quite down to earth but supportive. As soon as Mikos brother lost interest because he didn't want to put in the practice he was allowed to give it up ....he was not as keen as Miko ....mum was sad about it but accepted it....as you have to in the end!!

Interestingly both children are now following more in Dads footsteps....not IT  but on the sciences side. 

 

I know less about Claudia apart from what she has already said publicly about herself on YouTube and in other interviews.

 

 

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