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Does anyone know how long it takes RBS to review video auditions? Do they wait for all the in-person preliminary auditions to run and then fill only from the video pool if they have space left over?

 

I should probably have asked this months ago, but our deadline was January 8th, so my kid is beginning to get ants in her pants.

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The email confirmation that we received after submiting our video stated

“If you have submitted a video audition, these will be viewed together when the video selection panel convene and results will be emailed in January.”

so the results should be coming this week? 

Edited by Knh
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How did I forget this information may have appeared on the confirmation email?! I have been scouring the portal today trying to figure out what had made me think 'three weeks-ish' and that must be it!

 

/smacks forehead

 

Thank you (and good luck to your kid/s!)

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We heard back today (from our RBS video audition). It was a “no” for my DD, but it is fine as she is the type that is motived to train harder with each rejection (though we are fairly new to this) 🙂 

I just wanted to post that the letter included stats that some members seem to be interested in from time to time— 200 video applicants and 1200 in-person applicants. So very competitive indeed!

Good luck to your DCs with prelim auditions this weekend and finals in a few weeks! 

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It was not explicit in the letter but I believe it is for WL and CG combined.

(We applied for WL but the letter came from the Admissions Office of RBS and there was no mentioning of WL in any part of the letter. )

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Hi

 

DS reached finals for Elmhurst Yr 7 last year, he auditioned again this year for Yr 8 but didn't reach finals. 

 

He attended the Hammond boys' day last week and we received an email inviting him to audition as the vocational staff confirmed he showed real potential for full time vocational training. 

 

Obviously the wording of the email has really cheered DS up but I'm sure they probably send such emails out to a lot of the boys. He was also unsuccessful for a YBSS scholarship this year so has had his fair share of knocks. We know it's a tough industry and I am in awe of his resilience and passion, but it's such a young age to deal with this. 

 

Fingers crossed this time is his time.

 

How do you help your dcs cope with rejection? 

 

 

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Remind him that the kids who get knockbacks have more experience and resilience than those that seemingly sail through. The ability to pick yourself and carry on is as important as the performance and technique. Our DD got finals for both WL & Elmhurst year 7, auditioned again in year 8 for Elmhurst and got to finals, still no place. Tried again in year 9 and got in. It's been hard but that work ethic has helped her catch up. It's also surprised me how high the drop out rate from year 7 entries has been so that's no guarantee of success either.

 

It's not over until it's over or they give up.

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Sounds like your Dd has much to be proud of!

Getting a scholarship to YBSS is pretty rare and mostly given to full time, vocational students. Persistence is the name of the game and having it in bucketloads! In my experience, those who have it, together with some talent and a fair amount of natural ability  often go further than those with precocious talent and amazing facility, but little persistence.

Magic happens when a students technical ability and strength, plot on a graph at exactly the same point as their confidence and self belief. For some, yr7, for others years 9 or 10 and so on.

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Anyone else reaching a state of auditions fatigue? I’ve had enough now! Think dd has too she didn’t enjoy her rbs audition yesterday. Glad to have a break now until March! 

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Yes Dopedeedoo I know what you mean! Can be quite a draining process. Sorry to hear your dd didn't enjoy her RBS audition yesterday, from my experience with dd though you just never can tell, as at times has had her best outcomes from auditions she enjoyed least, and negative results from what she thought were the best auditions that she enjoyed most! I've given up trying to guess what any of it means 😂

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Which group was you in Dopedeedoo? I'm tired from the travelling but DD has bounced into school this morning. She loves it - the auditioning, the travelling, dancing in other studios, meeting other dancers etc. It leaves me drained! LOL. Oh to have their energy.

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Tiaramum group 4 at the end of the day which didn’t help. Up till now she’s enjoyed it and been bouncy but I think this one felt more daunting....having said that she woke up fine this morning and is looking forward to ballet later 😀 I think the after affects stay with the parents longer!!

Edited by Dopedeedoo
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Today my beautiful boy received an invitation to the White Lodge finals.

I am so proud of him.

Good luck to anyone else who is waiting. 

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23 minutes ago, Motomum said:

Today my beautiful boy received an invitation to the White Lodge finals.

I am so proud of him.

Good luck to anyone else who is waiting. 

Wow what a year he is having! Congratulations to him 🎉🎉🎉

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Thankyou MAK.

He has had an absolutely phenomenal year. Everything he has auditioned for he has been offered. 18 months ago it all started with a local EYB audition, and he hasn’t looked back since.

He will be happy either way with the finals outcome, we weren’t planning to apply for WL, but his JA teacher said it would be a missed opportunity.

 If it’s a no he will be over the moon if he is offered MAs.

He is having such a wonderful time at the moment.

 

I on the other hand find it all very stressful. 😩

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4 hours ago, Motomum said:

I on the other hand find it all very stressful. 😩

 

I know the feeling!  DD told me the other night that she was quite relaxed about audition results.  Read that as "Mum stop stressing"!  

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My wife and I are new to all this, and in particular to the world of private education of any kind. We have significant reservations about the value of paid-for education in general, and neither my wife nor I nor any of our four children have had anything other than state-funded education. I qualified for the bar and had all my tuition at school, university, and vocational level paid for by the state, and I also had grants to support my living expenses when I needed them. My wife went to Oxford and became a solicitor in similar fashion, and our first three children went to university having had a state education at school. Of course the increasing privatisation of the tertiary system is ruining things, but university is still just about a public good. You will have guessed, after this lengthy preamble, that our fourth child is different, and you would be right. He didn't dance a step before the age of eleven. Since then he has danced like a maniac, and I am not best placed to judge but he seems to be very good. He has been dancing in the evenings for three years and is currently dancing six days a week. He has been offered a place at Tring and at Hammond. I sympathise very much with what is said above about being caught up in an unstoppable and inexorable series of events - our son has auditioned, has been successful, and we have now realised it is going to be very difficult to tell him that he can't go to boarding school, which he is thinking will be something like Hogwarts. He will probably go to Hammond, but the question I have for anyone inclined to answer it is whether the large amount of cash we will be investing in his education will necessarily provide returns that would not be provided by his current regime of state secondary school and private dance classes in the evenings and weekends. Our son wants to join the Royal Ballet, and will certainly audition when he is a little older. Will going to the Hammond maximise his chances at sixteen, or will his raw talent be recognised by the Royal Ballet regardless of where he gets his dance education in the next two years? He works very hard at the moment. We will miss him dreadfully if he goes away, but would not for a minute deny him his opportunity in the world of dance if boarding school was going to give him that unique chance.

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This is a real "how long is a piece of string" question.  Much depends on the quality of his local dance school.  If he can get excellent training locally, supplemented by Associate classes, and Intensives during the holidays then he would stand a good chance of going to a good Vocational course after GCSEs. Things change radically as young people go through adolescence and may no longer be suited either physically or mentally to a career in dance.  I am now going to say something very unpopular - if the vocational school is giving you some form of scholarship or bursary then yes they believe in you.  If not, then there is always the danger that you are there just as ballast to make up the numbers.

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Firstly, congratulations to your son on his achievements and determination so far. There's probably no clear answer as to whether the money you pay out is worth it to give him a step up and greater opportunities. He will undoubtably enjoy training full-time with like-minded students and get intensive tuition and improved confidence etc. On the other hand, he won't have your close everyday parental support going through adolescence with all its challenges, and the balance of 'normal' life at home with friends who maybe have very different hobbies and interests. The Royal Ballet company is incredibly hard to get into - see other discussions on this forum as to how few British students are actually selected - but I guess being at vocational school might give some perspective on the range and reality of opportunities, as well as expert help preparing for auditions. A lot would depend, as Pas de Quatre says, on the quality of his current dance school and whether they could provide similar support. Have they advised him one way or the other? It's easy to get caught up in the dazzle of future ambitions and hopes, but lose sight of the long-term benefits of solid, regular practice, exam work and performances, along with solid academic qualifications for later life, if the dance career is shorter than expected due to injury or change of plans. Good luck with some difficult decisions!

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I too would have never considered a private education for my daughter, she is now in her second term at Hammond. I can’t say what the future holds for her, but I can already see the benefit of both the vocational and academic classes. She works hard, but is very average academically so the smaller class sizes benefit her greatly. I feel she would get lost in the average comp, as bobs along in the middle of the class.

Dance wise she has improved so much, she only took her Grade 3 last April but is already taking her IF exam in March. I think being with likeminded children has helped spur her on too. It seems to be working for us at the moment, but  I do miss her! 

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On the other hand we took up our place at a selective school

and have a really great local dance teacher. It’s a lot and tiring but dd is really happy which is all I can go by. We turned down a place at a great Vocatinal school with a 50% bursary it still was too expensive and dd decided she wanted to live at home. We will re explore her options when older. 

Edited by Dancer123
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For us WL was never going to be an option until I was asked by my sons JA teacher why he wasn’t auditioning and found out he could be a day attendee and that his teacher felt it was important he should have the opportunity to audition and suggested I contact RBS and chat with them. I did, hence the finals outcome.

 

My sons place would be on a full bursary, and he has SEN which would have to be fully supported. RBS are aware of all this and said, let him audition, let’s see what happens, then we can have a conversation about what happens  next.

 

He is currently Home Educated, has been for three years, so the educational support package from RBS would have to be really, really good if they want him, and for us to give up what he currently has access to. 

I have been assured by the RBS powers that be, everything is about the child’s dancing potential and ability, so we shall see.

 

For my son he is very happy to be spending a day at White Lodge doing what he loves, and it is for me to weigh up the pros and cons afterwards should he be offered a place.

 

I have many misgivings and concerns about the whole process of auditioning. For now though I just want my son to enjoy this experience alongside his dancing peers.

Edited by Motomum
Missed out words.
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There are very few non vocational schools in the UK that can provide a suitable training for someone thinking of a classical career or rather starting at a classically focused school at 16.

However, there are a few, and who knows, you may be lucky enough to live near one. If that was the case then you would have reassurance that your son was receiving the type of education you wish whilst being able to support him in his training at home. It is impossible to predict which one would have the better outcome because it will depend on your sons personality and whether he is more motivated by being at home or by being away. Some kids get lost in these big institutions while others thrive. One of the issues most people find with the latter set up is that the homework becomes too difficult to cope with whilst undertaking the sort of intense training needed to achieve a place at 16. Vocational schools balance the homework with the training but obviously there’s a price to pay. I empathise with your difficult decision. We have moved twice so that my Dc can be a day pupil at vocational schools.

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1 hour ago, Dancer123 said:

On the other hand we took up our place at a selective school

and have a really great local dance teacher. It’s a lot and tiring but dd is really happy which is all I can go by. We turned down a place at a great Vocatinal school with a 50% bursary it still was too expensive and dd decided she wanted to live at home. We will re explore her options when older. 

11 minutes ago, valentina said:

There are very few non vocational schools in the UK that can provide a suitable training for someone thinking of a classical career or rather starting at a classically focused school at 16.

However, there are a few, and who knows, you may be lucky enough to live near one. If that was the case then you would have reassurance that your son was receiving the type of education you wish whilst being able to support him in his training at home. It is impossible to predict which one would have the better outcome because it will depend on your sons personality and whether he is more motivated by being at home or by being away. Some kids get lost in these big institutions while others thrive. One of the issues most people find with the latter set up is that the homework becomes too difficult to cope with whilst undertaking the sort of intense training needed to achieve a place at 16. Vocational schools balance the homework with the training but obviously there’s a price to pay. I empathise with your difficult decision. We have moved twice so that my Dc can be a day pupil at vocational schools.

 

And if I remember correctly from previous threads Dancer123 is one of those lucky rare exceptions and the teacher her dd goes to is on a par with any vocational school.

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