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Prix de Lausanne 2019

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7 hours ago, Pas de Quatre said:

Prix de Lausanne list of participants

 

The list of participants names, nationalities and schools has just been published on the Prix de Lausanne website.

 

Thanks!

It always shocks me....only 7 video applications from the UK out of 363!   2 selected from UK 

71 candidates were selected from videos. There will be 80 in all, when you add in those pre-selected or invited.

 

Compare this with interest from other countries e.g Australia: 36 video applications - 9 selected.  

Meanwhile 14 selected from Japan, 13 from Sth Korea and 8 from USA via video applications. 

 

I understand that the finals clash with some UK school auditions but still I would expect more applications(?)

Last year many finalists were at the older end and looking for entry into a company e.g Shale Wagman (Princess Grace Academy) won his place  at ENB

 

https://www.prixdelausanne.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Nombre-de-candidats-PDL-2019_31oct18.pdf

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It’s disappointing but if you take away the very few top tier institutions in the UK such as RBS and ENBS which don’t send their dancers to P de L the provision of schools, at 16 especially, is actually quite light in the UK. For instance, London is a huge city on the world stage but where do you train in classical ballet only at 16-19 in London if you don’t get a place at RBS or ENBS and/or you don’t want Central? If you compare with say Florida in the States which we know well there is really high quality ballet provision in a number of towns across the State and not just in Miami. These schools are training students in a serious way- dancing the required hours and with top flight teaching - albeit the studios may be a bit grubby and not as nice as the lovely Floral Street. They may not have the brand name but that is not everything.

 

I feel in the UK to improve with these sorts of statistics we need to create more grass roots opportunities for more students. Just my view- others may disagree and feel there is a good selection of alternatives.

 

And of course query if there is a job at the end anyway if the provision were to increase...

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43 minutes ago, Flora said:

It’s disappointing but if you take away the very few top tier institutions in the UK such as RBS and ENBS which don’t send their dancers to P de L ......

 

Beatriz Kuperus a 3rd year student ENB is in the 2019 list of those competing.

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I feel better now about the 12-yr-old from out of town who beat DD and the rest of her age-group in the junior variations at a competition 2.5 years ago. She is the sole NZ representative – and is now what I call 'Balanchine tall'!

Edited by Cara in NZ
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On ‎31‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 23:35, DD Driver said:

Last year many finalists were at the older end and looking for entry into a company e.g Shale Wagman (Princess Grace Academy) won his place  at ENB

 

I think this illustrates exactly why there are not more UK applicants. Shale Wagman was only 17 years old when he won the PDL last year, and was in the older age category where dancers were competing for a place in a company. The UK upper school courses, obviously designed around the UK education system, train students from 16-19 years of age. Half of the 17 year olds training in the UK are still in their first year of upper school and would only have been there for a month or so at the time initial applications have to be submitted. They are not ready to enter companies at that point. It's not that they don't have the talent or potential, they're just not ready yet because of the way their training has been paced.

To enter in the younger category (15-16 years) British applicants MUST  be in year 11 at the time of their application so they would complete their GCSEs before starting upper school. I imagine that a high percentage of students at an appropriate level to enter the PDL are already in full time vocational training at schools which don't have the hours available in the timetable to allocate to competition preparation on top of GCSEs and US applications/ auditions.

That leaves year 11 students not already in vocational school. One young lady did it successfully a couple of years ago, but I wonder how many students there are out there who are both at the required standard in spite of not being trained full time, AND have access to the training provision to prepare for the competition. I suspect not many.

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56 minutes ago, invisiblecircus said:

 

I think this illustrates exactly why there are not more UK applicants. Shale Wagman was only 17 years old when he won the PDL last year, and was in the older age category where dancers were competing for a place in a company. The UK upper school courses, obviously designed around the UK education system, train students from 16-19 years of age. Half of the 17 year olds training in the UK are still in their first year of upper school and would only have been there for a month or so at the time initial applications have to be submitted. They are not ready to enter companies at that point. It's not that they don't have the talent or potential, they're just not ready yet because of the way their training has been paced.

To enter in the younger category (15-16 years) British applicants MUST  be in year 11 at the time of their application so they would complete their GCSEs before starting upper school. I imagine that a high percentage of students at an appropriate level to enter the PDL are already in full time vocational training at schools which don't have the hours available in the timetable to allocate to competition preparation on top of GCSEs and US applications/ auditions.

That leaves year 11 students not already in vocational school. One young lady did it successfully a couple of years ago, but I wonder how many students there are out there who are both at the required standard in spite of not being trained full time, AND have access to the training provision to prepare for the competition. I suspect not many.

 

Oh that is interesting. Definitely sheds some light on it for me!

 

The Prix did lower the age limit to 14 1/2 years old last year which helped some people.  As I say, it felt as though the older ones were more represented in the Finals but sometimes you can get what you want without reaching the last round.  Some of the elite international ballet schools like to take students at a young age, e.g. 15 and under, and don't have the same lower school/upper school distinctions you mentioned. 

 

In Australia, most school leavers are 18 but quite a lot will be 17.  Also you could leave school at 16/17 with ROSA, record of school achievement, and build on that (e.g. online) to get Higher School Certificate and tertiary qualifications later.

Edited by DD Driver
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8 hours ago, DD Driver said:

The Prix did lower the age limit to 14 1/2 years old last year which helped some people.  As I say, it felt as though the older ones were more represented in the Finals but sometimes you can get what you want without reaching the last round.  Some of the elite international ballet schools like to take students at a young age, e.g. 15 and under, and don't have the same lower school/upper school distinctions you mentioned. 

 

It wouldn't help British applicants because it would not be wise to try to enter US before completing GCSEs. Additionally, training tends to be slower paced in the UK so it is less likely that a 14 year old would be ready.

Actually, none of the 14 year olds who entered last year made it to the final although maybe some were picked up by schools anyway. I know that one had already received an offer from a previous competition.

 

I can't remember how many from each category were represented in the final last year but it does vary from year to year. Sometimes it's pretty equal but other times one group has more in the final. I remember one year that almost half the finalists were from the younger girls group, while only 3 senior boys were represented.
 

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I do believe there is a day after the final set aside for networking with schools etc so pretty much that day or within a couple of days....though some offers may be dependent on other things.

And not everyone takes up their prize offer so presumably that can be given to a second choice candidate but not sure of the time scale of that. 

 

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Yes, well, guess which day that RBS is holding its 2019 London upper school audition? I just checked. It is on the Sunday, the day after the Prix finals. Again.

 

You couldn't make it up.

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I'm hopefully going this year! Just as a spectator. I happen to be in Europe at the time so why not? Have just booked my hotel in Lausanne and now need to keep an eagle eye out for finals tickets. Very excited though! Two boys from my hometown are competing as well so fingers crossed for them :) 

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Sorry got the AD of RBS name wrong it's Christopher Powney not Kevin! Christopher  is the one who doesn't want to put young dancers at risk ......perhaps Kevin is the alter ego who doesn't mind the odd competition!! 

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More extensive live streaming from the Prix de Lausanne this year with both morning and afternoon sessions covered.

 

Schedule and links to both live streaming for 2019 and replays from 2018 here, I presume this is where the replays from 2019 will feature, too https://www.prixdelausanne.org/multimedia/live-streaming/

 

Live streaming in 2019 on Arte https://www.arte.tv/fr/videos/RC-014432/prix-de-lausanne/prochainement/   (I don't know whether they'll drop the word "prochainement" from the link come 4 Feb).

 

 

 

 

Edited by Duck
more details on link to replays
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the easy access to home schooling here in australia  and 'normality' of it at times from age 11 for dancers  probably makes it easier over here for them to access competitions  possibly, each city has at least a few schools offering 'full time training ' from age 11 ...obv they do home schooling but the hours they put in on ballet and contemporary and competition work is  substantially more compared to the girls doing after school dance  in the same city and they put in more hours than i found in uk ..... plus the access we have to competitions here is enormous  so preparation starts young  . Cant wait to watch  this covertly at work this week ! x

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live streaming also works from PdL Facebook site, if anyone is interested in. I was surprised to see that the girls were again rehearsing "Chroma" (by W. McGregor), same contemporary piece as in 2018. ahhh the memories with incomparable Shale Wagman...

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FB works fine for me as well. On a PC. Sometimes I have issues with my tablet during live feed. 

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Watched 4 boys rehearsing "Chroma" today. So, so interesting to see this process, and great coaching by Antoine Vereecken, the principal re-stager of Wayne McGregor's repertory. I look forward to see how they improve and to see them on stage with their individual interpretation. The level was set high last year....😉

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Been watching the classical coaching this afternoon. Just love the smile of candidate 408, Yu Wakizuka. I saw him in class earlier in the week and he was smiling back then just as during his variation a short while ago. Seeing him smile makes me smile, too.

 

 

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So good to see more steaming this year . Some lovely candidates ,Monique Loudiere is an inspirational coach always positive with very few words she drives the contestants to achieve more.

the commentators Jason and Naomi are so dull and repetitive especially Naomi ,if you have nothing to say just keep quiet and don’t repeat yourself (sorry but her delivery and voice irritates me ) yes we know that Elizabeth Platel is French and has the correct terminology for steps but don’t go on and on about it , a lame duck is not a step in France but how many studentsin UK or  US would know tour piqué 😃

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Including the boy from my hometown! Very exciting, and so glad I get to be in Lausanne watching it all (even though I did have to wake up at 3.30am this morning in order to catch a plane from Munich in time for morning selections...) Tomorrow's final is going to be so good!

 

Number 315, Beatriz Kuperus who trains at ENBS, has been an absolute standout for me all week. I watched her in class on the live stream and I have to say she shone even brighter in person, I couldn't take my eyes off her, even in the contemporary which normally isn't my favourite section. Does anyone else have someone who has consistently caught their eye this week?

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I read positive online comments about Noah but haven't seen him yet, I missed several hours. Then, didn't notice her because she was often in the back during class or group rehearsal, but No. 126 was brought to my attention. McKenzie Brown, 16 years old,  from the US, studying at Academie Princesse Grace. She is amazing! And I have seen her last year at the APG gala where she blew me away. She danced a piece by Fancesco Nappa, partnering with Shale Wagman! 😀 So glad she is a finalist and I keep my fingers crossed for her. Also, the Brazilian Gabriel Figueredo, no. 416, catched my eye during the contemporary part. And of course I keep my fingers crossed for the German Carl Becker from Palucca School Dresden. 

Just have to add: WAKIZUKA Yu No. 408, wow he shines bright on Stage!

Edited by Sabine0308
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Been watching most afternoons this week and was consistently drawn towards candidates

- 408 for his beaming smile

- 416 as it all just looks great (and I don't say this just because he trains at the John Cranko School in Stuttgart)

 

 

 

 

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1. BROWN Mackenzie - USA
2. FIGUEREDO Gabriel - Brazil

3. SASAKI Sumina - Japan

4. WAKIZUKA Yu - Japan

5. WU Shuailun - China

6. DA SILVA João Vitor - Brazil

7. JOAQUIM Alexandre - Portugal

8. SUMIYAMA Mio - Japan

 

Contemporary Dance Prize: BROWN Mackenzie - USA

Best Young Talent Prize: SHUGART Julia - USA

 

Best Swiss Candidate: SASAKI Sumina - Japan

 

Audience Favourite: BROWN Mackenzie - USA

 

Web Audience Favourite: CHOI Jihyun - South Korea

 

 

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