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Jan McNulty

News: Sadler's Wells Spring 2019 season announced

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Am I imagining it or has there been a price hike? The lowest price for most of the things I want to see is £15, rather than the £12 I've become used to.

 

I'm not really complaining, as it's still amazing value - unless they've re-thought the bands in the manner of ROH, of course...

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57 minutes ago, Lizbie1 said:

Am I imagining it or has there been a price hike? The lowest price for most of the things I want to see is £15, rather than the £12 I've become used to.

 

I'm not really complaining, as it's still amazing value - unless they've re-thought the bands in the manner of ROH, of course...

 

Well it does now say that ticket prices may change according to demand. Has it said that before at SW? I often leave booking for SW until nearer the time, when other more cast-sensitive dates have been finalised. Does that mean I will end up paying more?? (or, going less, in reality).

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1 hour ago, bridiem said:

 

Well it does now say that ticket prices may change according to demand. Has it said that before at SW? I often leave booking for SW until nearer the time, when other more cast-sensitive dates have been finalised. Does that mean I will end up paying more?? (or, going less, in reality).

 

Yes I noticed that for the first time too, but thought it probably meant that prices might be discounted if sales are slow, and that perhaps they were reacting to complaints from people who'd paid full price and wanted a part refund.  (There's no basis for this, it was all in my head!)

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19 minutes ago, Lizbie1 said:

 

Yes I noticed that for the first time too, but thought it probably meant that prices might be discounted if sales are slow, and that perhaps they were reacting to complaints from people who'd paid full price and wanted a part refund.  (There's no basis for this, it was all in my head!)

 

Sounds to me as if they intend to focus on so-called 'dynamic pricing' now.  Indeed, Bridiem's first sentence defined such.  

 

Edited by Bruce Wall
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There's so much I'm looking forward to.  I can't wait to see SFB but ENB and BRB's mixed bills sound interesting and I've also wanted to see Hobson's Choice for ages.  Victoria also looks interesting but I think I'm literally the only person who didn't like Jane Eyre 😄  (much as I wanted too!) so I'm wondering how much I will like this...

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Serenade, I coincide exactly with your choices but loved Jane Eyre: it's still with me!

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5 hours ago, bridiem said:

 

Well it does now say that ticket prices may change according to demand. Has it said that before at SW? I often leave booking for SW until nearer the time, when other more cast-sensitive dates have been finalised. Does that mean I will end up paying more?? (or, going less, in reality).

 

They might not have spelt it out in the past but it has happened. When ENB’s Khan Giselle for Autumn 2017 went on sale, the full price of the tickets I bought would have been  £25. Some months later I bought tickets for a friend. These tickets should have been in the same price range. The price had, however,  risen to £35 (at the full price).   As a Member of Sadler’s Wells I got a 20% reduction but the price differential remained.

Edited by Bluebird

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4 hours ago, Bluebird said:

 

They might not have spelt it out in the past but it has happened. When ENB’s Khan Giselle for Autumn 2017 went on sale, the full price of the tickets I bought would have been  £25. Some months later I bought tickets for a friend. These tickets should have been in the same price range. The price had, however,  risen to £35 (at the full price).   As a Member of Sadler’s Wells I got a 20% reduction but the price differential remained.

 

Thanks so for the frank honesty you so often display.  I understand - and share - your discomfort ...  This I fear is now a worldwide cultural reality.    Honestly, I think they had better spell it out so everyone can understand.  

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Hmm for one who isn't keen on non classical ballet which programme should I see. C looks the most likeable to me? 

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8 hours ago, Bruce Wall said:

 

Sounds to me as if they intend to focus on so-called 'dynamic pricing' now.  Indeed, Bridiem's first sentence defined such.  

 

 

Oh no!  :( 

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46 minutes ago, Don Q Fan said:

Hmm for one who isn't keen on non classical ballet which programme should I see. C looks the most likeable to me? 

 

Unlike some others here I haven't seen the Shostakovich Trilogy, but I think of Ratmansky as being basically at the classical end of today's spectrum (and he certainly knows the classical lexicon). Perhaps Bruce Wall can advise?

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I saw all of these ballets during SFB's Unbound festival last spring (except Hummingbird by Scarlett which I saw when it premiered a few years ago). Here are my thoughts.

Programme B — Liang / Marston / Pita

In The Infinite Ocean, Taiwanese-born American choreographer Edwaard Liang interprets loss and letting go.

This was very beautiful, my favourite of the festival. Liang's style is very classical

Cathy Marston adapts Edith Wharton’s haunting tale of adultery, Ethan Frome, in Snowblind.

This was  a very effective telling of this story but  you probably want to read a synopsis of the novel first.

 

And, in a match made in Wonderland, the fantastically surreal choreographer Arthur Pita is inspired by the music of the Icelandic icon, Björk Guðmundsdóttir for his Björk Ballet

This was weird, weird, weird, and not for you if you crave classical ballet or anything like it. It's kind of a shame it's on the same program as the Liang because if you like the Liang you probably won't like the Pita.

 

Programme C — Welch / Scarlett / Peck

Set to the violin concertos of Johann Sebastian Bach, Stanton Welch’s Bespoke explores dance itself in a love letter to ballet.

This is for you if you like classical ballet.

The critically acclaimed Hummingbird by British choreographer Liam Scarlett is accompanied by Philip Glass’ Tirol Concerto, with shadowy designs by regular collaborator John Macfarlane.

This is a great piece.

“Virtuoso of the form” (New York Times) Justin Peck uses the electronic music of M83 for Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming.

This is one of Peck's "sneaker ballets". It seemed less inspired to me than the several other Peck pieces I have seen and loved. I think he had a lot on his plate when he got this commission. But it is enjoyable, especially if you havent seen any other Peck.

 

 

San Francisco Ballet — Programme D — McIntyre / Wheeldon / Dawson

 

With the title lifted from the work of Walt Whitman, Your Flesh Shall Be a Great Poem inhabits the eccentric world of Trey McIntyre’s grandfather.

Yeah, i wasn't thrilled with this piece though the audience in general was. Worth it for Canadian Benjamin Freemantle's starring role.

Sadler’s Wells Associate Artist Christopher Wheeldon joins forces once again with the composer Keaton Henson to take on the modern world in Bound To.

This is a ballet about how we are obsessed with our cellphones! Has  a nice Wheeldonesque pdd but otherwise I felt the topic was too trivial.

And, in his first work for the company, David Dawson’s Anima Animus is ballet technique stretched to its outer limit, set to Ezio Bosso’s Esoconcerto.

I LOVED LOVED LOVED this piece (I'm a big fan of Dawson's choreography anyway). Tied for favourite with the Liang.

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Many thanks indeed toursenlair for these very helpful notes- and thanks to Jan for highlighting your post here.

 

This will really help.

One question- my ignorance- what's a sneaker ballet?

 

Re Pita- the pieces I have seen I would not say were particularly surreal,- though certainly original- and there is plenty of balletic movement in them, so maybe it's more so in this piece?

Re Snowblind:  I love Wharton's Ethan Frome- it is only a novella so would be not  a long read for anyone going to see this piece-recommended to all.

 

On the whole, the programmes do seem to mix up the styles....

Much to cogitate, if I am able to manage a second trip as well as the Ratmansky.......

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6 minutes ago, Mary said:

 

One question- my ignorance- what's a sneaker ballet?

 

 

its literally where they dance in sneakers (or trainers/plimsolls/daps if you prefer) rather then pointe shoes

(and often in more casual, street clothing, rather than leotards and tights)

 

At least, that's what I think they mean

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3 hours ago, zxDaveM said:

 

its literally where they dance in sneakers (or trainers/plimsolls/daps if you prefer) rather then pointe shoes

(and often in more casual, street clothing, rather than leotards and tights)

 

At least, that's what I think they mean

yes, that is correct. LIke the style of Jerome Robbins' West Side Story.

Here;s one of Peck's recent ones for NYCB

 

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I must admit, I'm a bit surprised to see that Sadler's Wells aren't offering any sort of multibuy on the SFB season.  You might have thought that would be a useful way of encouraging people to try more of the bills than they might normally (bearing in mind that the contents of those bills aren't necessarily the sort to attract the casual balletgoer).  Mind you, it looks as though any concept of multibuys has now ended: Members just get 20% off per performance, if I've read the new booking brochure correctly?

 

Also surprised, and disappointed, to see that the scheduling of the performances isn't such that people could do a block booking - perhaps Thurs, Fri and two Sat performances - so they could see all of the programmes within a very short space of time, which would make it easier for people coming from afar and needing to book travel and accommodation.

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She Persisted was the one I was waiting for - loved both Broken Wings and Rite of Spring on previous outings, so having them on the same bill, along with a new work from Stina Quagebeur,  is just fantastic.  Consequently had to splash out on good seats for a change !

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I had to miss Rite of Spring last time it was on, and as the run was sold out I was unable to exchange my ticket, so am really looking forward to it this time.

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I know it's difficult to be definitive on this but do people tend to find it's better to book early for Sadler's Wells to get the seats you like or to book later in the expectation that prices will fall?

I have mostly booked for ROH in the past where discounts are very rare so I almost always book early, but given recent ROH price hikes I am spreading my ballet £s around a bit more.

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Fab Sadler''s season, and all I had to do to get aaaaall the tickets I wanted was to cancel Christmas. 

 

Shame that ENB takes the high seats near the stage on the first circle off sale - their stalls prices are moving towards the unaffordable for more than one viewing.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Timmie said:

I know it's difficult to be definitive on this but do people tend to find it's better to book early for Sadler's Wells to get the seats you like or to book later in the expectation that prices will fall?

 

Prices aren't going to fall, Timmie.  It's fairly rare for Sadler's Wells to discount anything - even things which haven't sold particularly well. 

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Thanks Alison.

 

And, I am just about to book some tickets for SW and could do with some seat tips please. I’ve been there twice before but the same day for the same production and sat way back in the Upper Circle and then front row of the Stalls.

 

How does the SW Stalls rake compare with ROH (which is not very good in my experience) and London Coliseum which has a good rake?

When I select ‘Best Available Seats’ in the Stalls it gives me row G or H. Would these be good? I really hate heads in front of me and would prefer to go for the front row than risk this.

It looks like the Circle and Upper Circle have a good enough rake to not be a problem.

I know this is asked a lot and I have had a bit of search, any thoughts welcome.

(Booking for She Persisted and San Francisco prog C).

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I like the front row of the stalls when it is row A and AA is ok too.

 

I find the rake on the stalls good and G/H would be excellent IMHO.

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