Jump to content
CCL

English National Ballet: La Sylphide, The Song of the Earth / Le Jeune Homme et la Mort, London, January 2018

Recommended Posts

Song of the Earth: I liked Rojo on opening night but she's been even better in the past and the rest of the soloists didn't live up to her - though  the young Fernando Carratalá Coloma, the Messenger of Death, showed a lot of promise. So did Henry Dowden, making a very confident debut in the same role the next night, and I also liked Aitor Arrieta as the Man in that performance. 

 

Sylphide: A really attractive Sylph from Erina Takahashi last night and nice Jameses both nights from Isaac Hernandez and Ciro Tamayo (who would be even better if he could slightly turn down the volume on his acting in places). I like the way they are casting Effie, and Daniel Kraus as Gurn had the character very well. Praise also for the two leading sylphs, Precious Adams and Jia Zhang and - of course - for Eva kloborg's Madge and also for Jane Howarth in the same role. I didn't like the comedy act of the two farmhands, though, most especially when they were hamming about at the back of the stage when Effie was making her decision to accept Gurn. Some work needed on Wing Release and Cradle Management.

 

I'm afraid I simply don't get Jurgita Dronina - I've seen her in three big roles now and she's disappointed me each time - nothing wrong with her dancing but she seems to me very short of expressiveness and she doesn't hold my eye - I saw a lot more of the corps de ballet work in last night's Song of the Earth than I ever have before. Others may see her differently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m well into double figures so far as Sylphide is concerned and, as I may have indicated in my initial post, have watched Rojo, Cojocaru and Lamb dance the title role. I have no reservations about either Dronina's dancing or her characterisation (or acting). I thought she was good, as I thought Hernández and Haworth were both good.

 

I omitted mention of Kraus, but I liked him in the part of 'Gurn' (apropos of which, this is a Danish take on the Scottish highlands) and thought he danced the role with charisma.

 

I am interested to note the suggestion that the 'farmhands' were engaged in a 'comedy act'. In every performance I’ve seen, the two retainers puff and pant in exactly the same fashion. I’d always assumed it was Bournonville's staging rather than a recent introduction by the ENB.

 

 

Edited by RobR
Omitted conjunction

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 08/01/2018 at 21:00, MAX said:

Must be difficult for her to see Rina Kanehara taking such an important place at ENB.

 

I don't know Kanehara, is she that special ?

Yes she is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I attended the first of ENB’s two double bills on Wednesday evening and Thursday afternoon. Having already seen the programme in Milton Keynes, I still find the new production of “La Sylphide” vastly inferior in both design and content to the beautiful, award-winning Schaufuss production previously in the repertoire and I feel it a great shame, for whatever reason, that this jewel could not have been restored to the company for which it was made, especially having seen the delightful performances by Queensland Ballet a few years ago. Apart from containing less choreography, the Act I costumes grate, particularly the hard character shoes worn by the girls, and the Act II set is particularly dismal with its huge boulders rather than the idyllic woodland glade created by David Walker.  I am glad that the ending in which the sylph is taken up to sylph heaven (such a favourite device of the Romantic era with theatres keen to show off their stage machinery) has been restored, having been omitted in Milton Keynes perhaps due to lack of space, but the funeral procession of sylphs as this happens is something I could do without (it is not in the Schaufuss version) as bourrées travelling forward  in 5th position hardly ever look good in profile and, trying to cross the vast width of the Coliseum stage, can end up looking like a step-drag step rather than the floating vision they are supposed to represent.  My gripes about the production aside, there were some very fine performances to enjoy and I take my hat off to the company, having only finished its run of 34 ‘Nutcrackers’ the previous Saturday, for the energy and enthusiasm with which they performed.  I had seen most of the Wednesday cast in Milton Keynes and again warmed to Daniel Kraus’s endearing Gurn who makes you glad he gets the girl in the end.  Francesca Velicu’s Effy still needs to work on clarity in her mime and in her footwork but was quite touching at the end when she realised her happiness lay with Gurn.  Ciro Tamayo, as James, had developed more of a character than when I saw him in Milton Keynes and his dancing was superb.  Jia Zhang brought beauty and a deliciously Romantic style to the role of First Sylph.  As the sylph of the title, Erina Takahashi was a pure delight with her exquisite, effortlessly light dancing and charm.  I cannot understand why ENB’s website lists the sylph as one of the ‘five femme fatales’ of ballet!  The clue being in the word ‘fatale’, the term femme fatale surely implies a cruel female who uses her seductive powers to lure men to their death, which is hardly a description of this childlike woodland spirit who has watched James hunting in the glade since he was a child (as Takahashi’s mime so clearly describes) and is heartbroken at the thought of him giving his love to another but who has no thought of harming him!  There is no ‘dark side’ to the sylph in the original libretto and I am glad that none of the sylphs I have seen has been played as anything other than captivating and capricious.  The huge disappointment in this performance was the Madge of guest Eva Kloborg.  Having been privileged to see the great Niels Bjorn Larsen in the role a number of times, I expected someone with the same heritage to bring the same power and depth of characterisation to the role but sadly Kloborg’s Madge had neither weight nor depth.  This was even more evident when I watched Laura Hussey’s superb Madge at the Thursday matinee.  Her command of the stage, whether as the limping crone or at her moment of triumph over James, was totally thrilling and her mime was equally powerful, so that one could almost hear the words she was uttering.  Aaron Robison was the hapless James and it was wonderful to see him make full use of the stage area with his impressive, joyful dancing and beautifully stretched feet, especially in the beaten jumps.  His characterisation was a delight, being the true Romantic vision of a rather affable chap who yearns for the unattainable and, when he sat slumped on a tree stump at the end of Act II, head in hands as he realises what he has lost, I actually felt sorry for him, which of course the audiences of the period were expected to do.  His Effy was beautifully performed by Connie Vowles whose lovely, stylish dancing was matched by totally natural acting aided by great clarity in all her mime.  His Sylph was Alison McWhinney who was even more enchanting than when I saw her in Milton Keynes and, like Takahashi, her dancing was of the utmost delicacy, particularly her beautiful footwork.  So, although I would dearly love to see all these artists in the Schaufuss production, I will happily sit through a few more performances of the current one next week to enjoy their work again and see a few artists new to me in these roles.

As for “Song of the Earth” I have to confess that when I first saw it performed by the Royal Ballet many years ago, including at least one performance by the great Marcia Haydee, I could take it or leave it because I felt the choreography did not reflect the profundity of the music.  Now, possibly thirty years since the last time I saw it, I am very grateful that Lady MacMillan granted ENB permission to perform it because in Milton Keynes, Covent Garden and at the Coliseum I have quite simply fallen in love with the ballet due to the mesmerising performances I have seen.  It has been lovingly staged by Grant Coyle and it is very clear that the dancers consider it a privilege to dance so that each person onstage succeeds in bringing out the beauty of every step, as well as the meaning of the text and the music.  From the first exuberant entrance of the men in the First Song, this was a transcendental experience at both performances I saw this week.  Making his debut at very short notice as the Messenger (of Death) on Wednesday evening was Henry Dowden who was in full command of the choreography and the demanding partnering.  Aitor Arrieta as the Man, muted his usual charisma in the First Song as if to say any one of the six men could have been chosen by Death but, once he has been chosen, his is a magnetic portrayal.  In the brief interlude of gaiety before the Sixth Song, Senri Kou was sunshine itself in the Third Song as she was manipulated in acrobatic fashion by the quartet of men.  I was very interested to see what Jurgita Dronina would bring to the role of the Woman as I have only ever seen her in story ballets and, as she said to me afterwards, it is an entirely new style for her.   As expected, the quality and artistry of her dancing shone through, as well as a deep feeling for Mahler’s score (gorgeously played under the baton of Maestro Gavin Sutherland) that made her beautiful use of the upper body and ports de bras achingly so at times.  She excelled in the Sixth Song, particularly in the pas de deux with Arrieta towards the end and, as he leaves her and she gradually slides down his body to lay on the floor, her despair was palpable.  Another highlight for me was the softest of bourrées weaving across the stage and then that final slow-motion walk where she, Dowden and Arrieta were in perfect unison, to the glowing celeste and the singer’s fading “ewig” – breath-taking!  Kudos to Arrieta for partnering another of the company’s ballerinas in a second performance of MacMillan’s complex choreography less than twenty-four hours later which, for me, was the most sublime one I have seen, from the effervescent Adela Ramirez in the Third Song, the lovely pas de deux from James Forbat and Connie Vowles in the Fourth Song, through to the trio of named characters who were a dream team for me.  The only slight downside was the singing in which, at times, it was audible that the voices were tiring.  It is a huge ask for singers to perform Mahler’s epic song cycle twice in less than twenty-four hours and I am amazed Rhonda Browne and Samuel Sakker agreed to it although the opportunity to perform multiple times a song cycle that is not often performed even in concert halls must be extremely tempting!  Joining Arrieta in my dream team were Ken Saruhashi as the Messenger and Fernanda Oliveira as the Woman, surpassing the superb performance they gave in Milton Keynes.  Saruhashi has developed his persona even further to give a performance so nuanced and multi-faceted that he is fast developing into a true dramatic dancer.  Likewise, the innately musical Oliveira brought a beauty and an almost unbearable poignancy to MacMillan’s choreography which took the Sixth Song, in particular, to another level and made the final moments both heartrending and uplifting at the same time. This team gives their last scheduled performance tomorrow afternoon and I would urge anyone in the vicinity to take advantage of one of the many ticket offers and spend sixty-five minutes in pure ballet heaven and you will have the bonus of the lovely Alison McWhinney in “La Sylphide” which follows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a great review, Irmgard. I love the way you honour so many of ENB's dancers on an individual basis.

I am planning to write once I have seen tomorrow's shows but I know that my account will be nowhere near as rich as yours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Irmgard,  for your review. I asked in earlier post if anyone had seen both the Schaufuss and the current production and was really interested to read your comparison. 

Edited by Darlex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Irmgard said:

I  I cannot understand why ENB’s website lists the sylph as one of the ‘five femme fatales’ of ballet!  The clue being in the word ‘fatale’, the term femme fatale surely implies a cruel female who uses her seductive powers to lure men to their death, which is hardly a description of this childlike woodland spirit who has watched James hunting in the glade since he was a child (as Takahashi’s mime so clearly describes) and is heartbroken at the thought of him giving his love to another but who has no thought of harming him!  There is no ‘dark side’ to the sylph in the original libretto and I am glad that none of the sylphs I have seen has been played as anything other than captivating and capricious.  The huge disappointment in this performance was the Madge of guest Eva Kloborg.  Having been privileged to see the great Niels Bjorn Larsen in the role a number of times, I expected someone with the same heritage to bring the same power and depth of characterisation to the role but sadly Kloborg’s Madge had neither weight nor depth. 

 

Surely the Sylph is very much a seductress, even if I wouldn't use the term femme fatale to describe her.  She seduces James away from his bride on the eve of his wedding and indirectly brings about his downfall.  Some sylphs I've seen have been more alluring than "childlike", it's a role where a certain leeway in interpretation exists.

 

Eva kloborg plays Madge as an evil presence seeking vengeance for her wounded pride, for me it was a subtle and highly nuanced performance.  Ms Kloborg made her debut in the role in 2008 at the performance marking the retirement of her husband, Frank Andersen, and has thought deeply about the character and her motivation.  I found her chilling.  In the current RDB production by Nikolai Hubbe Madge is no longer a woman but a hard line Presbyterian preacher with secret desires for James, similar to Claggart's motivation in destroying Billy Budd.  

 

".......but the funeral procession of sylphs as this happens is something I could do without (it is not in the Schaufuss version) as bourrées travelling forward  in 5th position hardly ever look good in profile and, trying to cross the vast width of the Coliseum stage, can end up looking like a step-drag step rather than the floating vision they are supposed to represent."

 

It may not have been in the Peter Schaufuss version but it is totally authentic, indeed to exclude it sounds perverse.  For many years a production by Hans Brenaa was performed in Copenhagen though by the time of the last Bournonville festival the company was performing a traditional version by Hubbe and the funeral procession was a feature of both.  I have no reason to believe it is not authentic Bournonville and thought the dancers of ENB performed the bourees very well..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Darlex said:

Thanks, Irmgard,  for your review. I asked in earlier post if anyone had seen both the Schaufuss and the current production and was really interested to read your comparison. 

Did you know that an LFB performance of the Schaufuss production, which was filmed for television,  is available complete on youtube?  It stars the divine Evdokimova.  Just search for la sylphide evdokimova and it should come up - happy memories!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Irmgard said:

Did you know that an LFB performance of the Schaufuss production, which was filmed for television,  is available complete on youtube?  It stars the divine Evdokimova.  Just search for la sylphide evdokimova and it should come up - happy memories!

Its so fortunate that this recording exists. I have seen the Schaufuss production live too with Evdokimova and yes, she was divine and the rest of the cast were fabulous. I haven't seen the new production yet. 

Edited by Darlex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Irmgard said:

This team gives their last scheduled performance tomorrow afternoon and I would urge anyone in the vicinity to take advantage of one of the many ticket offers and spend sixty-five minutes in pure ballet heaven and you will have the bonus of the lovely Alison McWhinney in “La Sylphide” which follows.

 

Oh, believe me, I intend to :)  Of the three casts I've seen, this one felt the best integrated - but then the chopping and changing of dancers in the other casts can't have helped.

 

Incidentally, this run has, I think, cleared up something that has bothered me for years: I don't actually think any of the dancers are in khaki for any of it, are they?  I think all the supporting cast are in grey, and that any impression of khaki-ness is simply produced by the golden lighting on the supporting dancers compared with the whiter lighting on the principals.  I'd always thought the demi-soloists, so to speak, were in grey and the others were in khaki, but now think I've been wrong all these years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went to see ENB last night at London Coliseum. I haven’t seen Song before and when it comes to the more abstract ballets my natural affinity is not with Macmillan so I don’t really want to comment too much, except to say that Rojo and the other female leads in each of the songs dazzled. Loved the 3rd and 6th songs the most. Striking ending.

 

Sylphide was lovely, wasn’t too overwhelmed by the bright costumes- I don’t think they are much brighter than the Danish version I have on DVD. Dronina was a perfect Sylphide and close enough to see her facial expressions I think she did convey happy/sad/mischief... Beautiful Romantic arms but not sure the corps got the memo about the Romantic style, arms not soft and delicate enough. Hernandez was a dynamic James, giving the explosive music a run for its money with his giant leaps and tight footwork. 

 

I am a a big fan of national dances which feature in the classical repertoire and the Scottish dancing was wonderful at the wedding celebration. The children who danced deserve a special mention for their contribution- and what a fabulous opportunity. 

 

Star of the show for me was Jane Haworth though for her characterisation of Madge - a truly manipulative crone! She was my first Myrtha in Giselle many moons ago!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw the Friday night and Saturday matinee performances. Having not been particularly enamoured with Song of the Earth at the ROH a few years ago I was surprised to find that I really enjoyed it on Friday, hence my booking for the performance on Saturday. I felt that the Oliveira/Arrieta/Sarahusi cast was the more integrated one and Oliveira had the edge over Takahashi in terms of intensity. I've been pondering the Messenger role. I'm no expect but I think that he can be played in a variety of ways. I don't think that he has to be a tall or physically 'substantial' dancer or one who has a very menacing presence. Ken Sarahusi is very slightly built and a rather quicksilver dancer. His Messenger was not physically dominating but an insistent figure, always returning to remind the Man and the Woman that death awaited. He was not sinister or threatening but quietly bided his time. I personally thought that he was very effective in the role. Adela Ramirez and Senri Kou were both excellent in the Third Song (I thought that the whole corps was very good, actually). I have wondered before why the latter has not been cast in leading roles as she has always impressed me in the featured roles that I have seen her in. I would have thought that she'd be a natural Giselle and Sylph (ah, the mysteries of casting and career progression again....)

 

As for La Sylphide, well, I rather liked the costumes (although perhaps another colour could have been substituted for the yellow). People are always complaining about how dark and drab sets and costumes are. Ciro Tamayo's dancing was spectacular but I agree that he could tone the acting down a notch; however, I was sitting in the stalls and perhaps it came across better to people sitting further away. Rina Kanehara was a lovely rather child-like Sylph, playful and coquettish. I thought that she could hardly be bettered but Alison McWhinney's beautiful soulful Sylph was absolutely heartbreaking at the end. I would like to pay a special mention to the children (from the Young Dancers Academy and the West London School of Dance) taking part. They were excellently drilled and a total delight (particularly the little boy wearing the red kilt dancing at the front).

 

Btw, is it really the case that Ciro Tamayo performed on four consecutive days this week (he was in both of the performances that I saw)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw the Satuday matinee...I really enjoyed it. 

 

I have seen Song once before the last time the RB did it but my seat was really bad, I couldn't see much.  At the time I liked what I could see and enjoyed the music and have always wanted to see it again.  This time round I had a great view but I think I didn't feel very connected to it until nearer the end when Fernanda Oliveria's performance really got me.  I feel like it's a ballet I could love because it's a really interesting piece of work, I really like the idea's behind it and the music...it all comes together so well.  But I can't put my finger on it except I just didn't feel drawn in for quite a lot of it.  I didn't love it...but I wanted to! :lol:  One to definitely try again in the future.  

 

I really loved La Sylphide...I thought Ciro Tamayo was just fantastic, very impressive.  I've never seen this ballet before but I'm an instant fan.  Alison McWhinney danced beautifully and gave a great performance.  I thought the whole piece was well acted by everyone, costumes and set I loved, and the big group number towards the end of the first act was a lot of fun.  Then the sadness and heartbreak of the second act was really well played too.  I just wish the whole thing was longer but then it wouldn't be the same ballet would it...hopefully it wont be too long before another company does it and I'll get to see it again :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, aileen said:

I saw the Friday night and Saturday matinee performances. Having not been particularly enamoured with Song of the Earth at the ROH a few years ago I was surprised to find that I really enjoyed it on Friday, hence my booking for the performance on Saturday. I felt that the Oliveira/Arrieta/Sarahusi cast was the more integrated one and Oliveira had the edge over Takahashi in terms of intensity. I've been pondering the Messenger role. I'm no expect but I think that he can be played in a variety of ways. I don't think that he has to be a tall or physically 'substantial' dancer or one who has a very menacing presence. Ken Sarahusi is very slightly built and a rather quicksilver dancer. His Messenger was not physically dominating but an insistent figure, always returning to remind the Man and the Woman that death awaited. He was not sinister or threatening but quietly bided his time. I personally thought that he was very effective in the role. Adela Ramirez and Senri Kou were both excellent in the Third Song (I thought that the whole corps was very good, actually). I have wondered before why the latter has not been cast in leading roles as she has always impressed me in the featured roles that I have seen her in. I would have thought that she'd be a natural Giselle and Sylph (ah, the mysteries of casting and career progression again....)

 

As for La Sylphide, well, I rather liked the costumes (although perhaps another colour could have been substituted for the yellow). People are always complaining about how dark and drab sets and costumes are. Ciro Tamayo's dancing was spectacular but I agree that he could tone the acting down a notch; however, I was sitting in the stalls and perhaps it came across better to people sitting further away. Rina Kanehara was a lovely rather child-like Sylph, playful and coquettish. I thought that she could hardly be bettered but Alison McWhinney's beautiful soulful Sylph was absolutely heartbreaking at the end. I would like to pay a special mention to the children (from the Young Dancers Academy and the West London School of Dance) taking part. They were excellently drilled and a total delight (particularly the little boy wearing the red kilt dancing at the front).

 

Btw, is it really the case that Ciro Tamayo performed on four consecutive days this week (he was in both of the performances that I saw)?

My Dd was one of them! She will be thrilled to hear how you enjoyed her and her classmate's performance. And yes it has been an amazing opportunity for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, aileen said:

 

 

Btw, is it really the case that Ciro Tamayo performed on four consecutive days this week (he was in both of the performances that I saw)?

 

I dropped in on Wed, Thurs and Friday Evening performances and Tamayo danced James in all of them as he obviously did the Saturday matinee - so, yes, four consecutive outings.  That's going some.  Thought his dancing was excellent in each - and his focus varied subtly for each of his Sylphs.  If I had to chose one out of that latter number as my personal best I think I'd plum for Kanehara.  She glistened ... as much as listened ... throughout.  Thought Kloborg too a  most telling Madge; the very personification of a alcoholic.  The redolent stench of spirits spat from her eyes and gave understandable licence to this character's overt selfishness.   Rojo ruled searingly in Song and Robison as Saturday night's Messenger telegraphed through vivid indication the great things that are to come for us in his regard during his ENB tenure.    

Edited by Bruce Wall

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amos73, did the same children dance at all the performances and go on tour with the company to Manchester and Milton Keynes? And is this the first time that these schools have performed with the company? I know that Elmhurst always perform in the Nutcracker but I don't know which school performed in Corsire or R&J (I think that there are children in the Deane in-the-round version which the company performed at the Royal Albert Hall).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Aileen - yes they did the tour weeks with ENB as well in october. 

La sylphide is the first production that their school have been asked to provide children for ENB.

 

Tring provides the children for nutcracker. 

It has been an amazing experience for the children and they have loved every second of it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your reply, amos73. Yes, it must have been a wonderful experience for them. Of course, they have another seven performances before they have to return to 'normal' life. If you wouldn't mind saying, who is your child's favourite Sylph?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi aileen

Yes they have one more week. She is definitely going to be very sad when it is all over and they are back to reality. Getting a taste of company life has been so inspiring for her.

I will ask her tonight if she has a favourite!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/14/2018 at 12:17, aileen said:

Btw, is it really the case that Ciro Tamayo performed on four consecutive days this week (he was in both of the performances that I saw)?

 

As others have said , he did.

Moreover, Ken Saruhashi danced the role of The Messenger of Death last Thursday afternoon, Friday evening and Saturday matinee. That is a very big  (even bigger?) 'ask'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw Saturday evening's performance and as on Wednesday I liked the way ENB danced Song of the Earth, it felt more lyrical and less full of gloom than usual, and it was great to see Tamara Rojo, wish she was dancing the Sylphide too. Liked the first Sylphide cast on Saturday, looking forward to seeing different ones this week, I'm not booked to see him but won't mind if Ciro Tamayo dances James again! Good to see the Balcony almost full again, hope ticket sales pick up this week.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Out of the four Songs I saw, I thought the Saturday matinee Oliveira cast was the most coherent - and cohesive.  There had been some problems with synchronisation among the men at earlier performances, but either these had been ironed out by then, or I was getting less sensitive to them, or they were less obvious from my viewing angle. Also, it's taken me a while to get used to some very different viewpoints than what I'm used to for this ballet at the Royal Opera House. I liked several of the female soloists, even if I felt that some of them played to the audience a bit too much: it seems to me that Song of the Earth ought to be almost internalised, with the dancers in their own little world and not conscious that they are being watched.  I thought Aitor Arrieta did well as the Man, too, and Ken Saruhashi impressed me as the Messenger of Death - he seems to have "got" the role well - although by then I think he'd danced the role 4 times that week, so ought to be well familiar with it!

 

I've seen less of the Sylphides, so am less able to comment on them.  As I mentioned above somewhere, I liked Alison McWhinney's Sylphide a good deal, although since I've caught her quite a bit already I'll probably skip hers tomorrow and go for a different cast instead.  Also liked Ciro Tamayo's James a lot - although so far I've not really felt that any of the James I've seen have totally caught that Romantic ardour/hotheadedness or whatever that should fuel his pursuit of the sylph and his abandonment of his fiancee.  I was also surprised to see quite so much open blue sky in the second act - I thought it usually took place in a forest glade or something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, alison said:

 I was also surprised to see quite so much open blue sky in the second act - I thought it usually took place in a forest glade or something?

 

That's in order to give a clear view of the Sylph ascending to sylphide heaven.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not that I remember, but if a home theatre can't fly the tableau I suppose they can put in more forest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apologies for a website comment in the middle of the discussion but I keep getting caught by the fact that the new comments are now on the second line of the title - pages 1 and 2 on the first line, page 3 on the second line.  In writing this I'll hopefully remember but I wondered if there was a web design solution which might ensure that all page numbers were kept together on one line?  In this case all the page numbers would now be on the second line.  As I say sorry for breaking the flow and many thanks for all the fascinating posts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Foteini Christofilopoulou was at the dress rehearsal for 'Le Jeune Homme et la Mort' which opens tonight - here are some photos:

 

38826391235_cd96c55ac8_z.jpg
Tamara Rojo, Ivan Vasiliev
© Foteini Christofilopoulou. Courtesy of DanceTabs / Flickr

 

39015339074_d98dd9c7e8_z.jpg
Ivan Vasiliev, Tamara Rojo
© Foteini Christofilopoulou. Courtesy of DanceTabs / Flickr

 

See more... 

Set from DanceTabs: ENB - Le Jeune Homme et la Mort
Courtesy of DanceTabs / Flickr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×