Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Yes to some extent I agree about the "advanced fare" train dilemma but if planned well in advance and bought well in advance you should be able to get a ticket where you are not up against it!  Some people do always put themselves on a tight timetable ....which may be necessary sometimes but isn't always necessary.....just a habit. 

i just wouldn't enjoy the ballet if I was worried about having to get away quickly because I've only got half an hour to get a train!! 

Far better to allow extra time!!

Problems may occur if have bought a last minute theatre ticket of course.... as then usually any advanced tickets on trains available within less than a week of the journey will be few and far between so less choice of trains etc.

These tickets do make a big difference in price though.

For example if I plan well I can get up to London and back from Brighton with my senior rail card for £3-30 each way.

Otherwise it will cost me £23 -50 to travel on any train if coming back on another day or £15 for a day return( at weekends) to travel on any train. So it does pay to plan well. 

Sometimes if I cannot predict which time I'll be wanting to come back just have to grin and bare it and pay more! 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Douglas Allen said:

It might be, of course, that those members of the audience who got up and left without applauding were dissatisfied with the quality of performance they had witnessed and did not wish to applaud. Seems fair enough if that were the case. How would you have all reacted if they had really disliked what they saw and decided to boo?

 

Gosh. It wouldn't even occur to me to do either.  For one, I've never seen a performance by the Royal Ballet that was of sufficiently low quality to make me walk out or boo the dancers.  

Even if I'm not enamoured of the choreography, I can still admire the dancers' commitment and hard work.  If I don't enjoy the composer's music I would still applaud the orchestra, and so on.  I can't imagine a performance at the ROH where every single performer was sufficiently sub-par for me not to applaud any of them.  

 

If all those people who hotfooted it out of the stalls on Saturday afternoon did so because they were dissatisfied with the performance, they must have seen a completely different ballet than the one I watched. 

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Douglas Allen said:

It might be, of course, that those members of the audience who got up and left without applauding were dissatisfied with the quality of performance they had witnessed and did not wish to applaud. Seems fair enough if that were the case. How would you have all reacted if they had really disliked what they saw and decided to boo?

I cannot imagine that anybody could watch such a performance and find absolutely nothing to applaud.  I remember sitting through Twyla Tharp, hating every minute and very conscious of my friend feeling similar, and wanting to shout 'rubbish,' but:  others were enjoying it  and  I think it is bad manners to spoil other peoples pleasure, and the dancers were terrific.  I wondered at the wisdom of staging what seemed to me some very old-fashioned work presented as ground-breaking, but that had absolutely nothing to do with the performers.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Douglas Allen said:

It might be, of course, that those members of the audience who got up and left without applauding were dissatisfied with the quality of performance they had witnessed and did not wish to applaud. Seems fair enough if that were the case. How would you have all reacted if they had really disliked what they saw and decided to boo?

 

Well if someone didn't like the performance they could just not clap, or if they thought the dancers were really abysmal (which doesn't seem likely) I suppose they could boo. I've occasionally been tempted to boo at the quality of a work, not the quality of any dancers, but I don't think I've ever actually done so since it's really only the dancers who would suffer. The trouble with leaving immediately is that it's discourteous to your fellow audience members. (In fact the dancers probably couldn't see them leaving anyway with the lights still down.) 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What really annoys me are standing ovations! Not as common at the ROH, but it seems that nearly every theatre performance,  even if pretty run of the mill, is greeted by people leaping to their feet and obstructing the view of others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ninamargaret said:

What really annoys me are standing ovations! Not as common at the ROH, but it seems that nearly every theatre performance,  even if pretty run of the mill, is greeted by people leaping to their feet and obstructing the view of others.

 

This is a difficult one. I have stood up occasionally at the ROH, the Coli and Sadlers Wells after something really extraordinary, perhaps hoping that others would stand too. But they didn't and, on the most memorable occasion (Edward Watson's Mayerling last year, which, at the time, could have been his last), I was told to sit down

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ninamargaret said:

What really annoys me are standing ovations! Not as common at the ROH, but it seems that nearly every theatre performance,  even if pretty run of the mill, is greeted by people leaping to their feet and obstructing the view of others.

 

Yes, I've found in my occasional forays to see large scale musicals that people tend to leap to their feet at the end ... or even worse, before the end!!!

 

I do occasionally ovate at the ballet but only when I've been so completely swept away I can't stop myself and on special occasions (as the end of June this year will be).

 

I know enough dancers at the companies I follow to know that they really appreciate SOs.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes- if it becomes normal to give standing ovations, as seems to be happening in the West End,  the problem becomes- how to display the next level of appreciation? leaping onto the stage  and embracing the dancers?😄

 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, capybara said:

 

This is a difficult one. I have stood up occasionally at the ROH, the Coli and Sadlers Wells after something really extraordinary, perhaps hoping that others would stand too. But they didn't and, on the most memorable occasion (Edward Watson's Mayerling last year, which, at the time, could have been his last), I was told to sit down

 

I occasionally - maybe less than once a year - feel almost moved to stand after a truly great performance (most recently having been blown away by Lisette Oropesa in Lucia di Lammermoor), but the main thing that stops me is the cheapening of the standing ovation; the feeling that in most places it's become more about the ovator demonstrating how exquisite their sensibility is than the ovatee/s having delivered something outstanding.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think its the apparent cheapening of it that annoys me. If it's an exceptional performance, fine, but it's the way it's become the norm in many theatres. I did take part when the RSC did the Shakespeare histories in 2006, which was a true tour de force - 8 plays, 5 days, numerous actors all doubling/trebling parts like mad.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve only done it once, when we saw Johan Kobborg and Alina Cojacaru’s extraordinary “Mayerling” but so did the whole theatre.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The trouble is that if I stood up to applaud all the performances that have really thrilled me, I'd be jumping up regularly! And blocking the view for others who aren't necessarily quite so excited... So I leave the rest of the audience to 'decide', and on the rare occasion when a lot of people do stand up, usually towards the end of the applauding, I join in (if I feel the same).

Edited by bridiem
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with all the irritation expressed above - standing ovations used to be really rare and for incredibly memorable performances whereas now they have become standard, particularly when you get big stars appearing. My most annoying one was seeing Christian Slater in One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest - granted he was very good in it (but not standing ovation good) but he actively gestured to the audience to stand which I thought was really out of order. So I remained resolutely in my seat but of course couldn't see a thing during the curtain calls. Also (and I may be a minority of one on this) I am not too keen on clapping dancers onto the stage unless it's a retirement performance or some such. Much as I love my favourite dancers I feel they haven't actually done anything when they first appear. But as I say, suspect I'm definitely in the minority on this!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm yes- capping a dancer onto the stage -that's something I am ambivalent about. It can rather intrude on the performance and sometimes feels like an audience member 'showing off' that s/he knows the dancer ( think if you got it wrong!)

On the other hand it is nice to do it for special occasions such as a visiting dancer, one who is about to retire, or certainly one who is coming back from injury...I have clapped for that reason out of sympathetic joy in seeing the dancer again and I shall feel 'like clapping on' Ed Watson and Steven McRae when they return, I know.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, BMC said:

Also (and I may be a minority of one on this) I am not too keen on clapping dancers onto the stage unless it's a retirement performance or some such. Much as I love my favourite dancers I feel they haven't actually done anything when they first appear. But as I say, suspect I'm definitely in the minority on this!!

 

My dad refuses to applaud the entrance of a conductor for the same reason, even though in that case the established etiquette is very clear!

Edited by RuthE
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, RuthE said:

 

My dad refuses to applaud the entrance of a conductor for the same reason, even though in that case the established etiquette is very clear!

 

I usually compromise by giving them a one-handed "musician's clap" against the thigh/programme/similar (handy also for expressing bare minimal appreciation) until after the final interval.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, RuthE said:

 

My dad refuses to applaud the entrance of a conductor for the same reason, even though in that case the established etiquette is very clear!

sensible dad! you never know what you're going to get! My late husband frequently refused to clap the ROH orchestra on ballet nights when they had played poorly!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mary ...your post about leaping on the stage to embrace the dancers made me laugh out loud!! 

Im deaf at the moment ...just off to the Doctors to have my ears syringed....I will be so relieved that afterwards I will want to embrace anyone I meet in the street!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Fiz said:

I’ve only done it once, when we saw Johan Kobborg and Alina Cojacaru’s extraordinary “Mayerling” but so did the whole theatre.

 

 

I have stood twice - Like you, Fiz, after Alina and Johan's final RB performance and at the National Theatre's 7 hour, two in a day, performances of Angels in America - which is/was truly astonishing.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Each performance should be judged by an independent panel of up to 2,256 judges for worthiness of a standing ovation. Judges who consider that a performance is worthy of a standing ovation should stand up and indicate that decision by hitting their hands together repeatedly until either the judge or the recipient of the applause walks away#. Any judge that wishes to contest another judge's verdict should contact the venue's management where they will be issued with a 50p voucher which can be redeemed against the cost of a future performance*

 

# auditorium doors shut at 2300hrs

* a maximum of one voucher per judge, valid for twelve months from date of issue

 

I'll get my coat 🙃

Edited by Rob S
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Rob S said:

Each performance should be judged by an independent panel of up to 2,256 judges for worthiness of a standing ovation. Judges who consider that a performance is worthy of a standing ovation should stand up and indicate that decision by hitting their hands together repeatedly until either the judge or the recipient of the applause walks away#. Any judge that wishes to contest another judge's verdict should contact the venue's management where they will be issued with a 50p voucher which can be redeemed against the cost of a future performance*

 

# auditorium doors shut at 2300hrs

* a maximum of one voucher per judge, valid for twelve months from date of issue

 

I'll get my coat 🙃

 

Is that the seating capacity of the ROH?  If so, the Liverpool Empire at 2300 is bigger!!

 

Brilliant post Rob S.

 

In Paris in 2006 we were privileged to witness Agnes LeTestu and Jiri Bubenicek performing Lady of the Camellias which garnered a massive standing ovation.  The technical crew obviously got fed up of hanging around, turned up the houselights and left us to it!!  The bulk of the audience stood there stamping their feet and clapping for the best part of half an hour...

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The longest standing ovation I was involved in was at the end of a promenade concert at the RAH many years ago. It was a celebration of the birthday of William Walton, born in my home town of Oldham,  it was Belshazzar's Feast and we applauded for 47 minutes - he actually returned to the stage wearing his hat and overcoat. It was a standing ovation because we were prommers and were standing anyway. Just made it to the pub before last orders - that's how long ago it was.  Happy days.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, BMC said:

Also (and I may be a minority of one on this) I am not too keen on clapping dancers onto the stage unless it's a retirement performance or some such. Much as I love my favourite dancers I feel they haven't actually done anything when they first appear. But as I say, suspect I'm definitely in the minority on this!!

 

Maybe not.  The only time I recall clapping someone when they made an entrance was Alina Cojocaru on her return in Giselle after that awful neck injury.

 

6 hours ago, Mary said:

On the other hand it is nice to do it for special occasions such as a visiting dancer, one who is about to retire, or certainly one who is coming back from injury...I have clapped for that reason out of sympathetic joy in seeing the dancer again and I shall feel 'like clapping on' Ed Watson and Steven McRae when they return, I know.

 

Exactly

 

6 hours ago, RuthE said:

 

My dad refuses to applaud the entrance of a conductor for the same reason, even though in that case the established etiquette is very clear!

 

Although it seems to me that the average conductor these days tends to acknowledge the applause only briefly and then goes "Right, everyone, let's get to work!" mighty quickly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, SPD444 said:

The longest standing ovation I was involved in was at the end of a promenade concert at the RAH many years ago. It was a celebration of the birthday of William Walton, born in my home town of Oldham,  it was Belshazzar's Feast and we applauded for 47 minutes

 

You beat my personal record! This was after an astonishing performance of Electra in Vienna in the 1970s: we students had queued all night for a ticket, then stood for the performance, and then cheered afterwards for almost half the running time of the show, some 45 minutes. A glorious memory.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this has already been mentioned on numerous occasions earlier in this thread - but why do people have to continuously fidget and shift their weight from one side of their seat to the other.  Very, very annoying for those sitting directly behind them!!! :angry:

 

I had the unfortunate pleasure (!) of having one such individual sit in front of me last night at a performance of Wicked at the Edinburgh Playhouse.  This man didn't sit in one position for more than 2 minutes.

 

Having arrived minutes before curtain up he completely burst my wonderful cosy little bubble than I was about to have an entirely unimpinged view of the performance.  He wasn't overly tall so I thought it probably would be okay, but no!!!

 

Thankfully I was able to have a quick, sneaky, look behind me and realised that the patrons behind me were exceptionally tall and had no problem seeing over my head, so I was able to adjust my viewing line as necessary to enable me to see something.

 

As I had a sister-in-law on either side of me I was able to encroach on their space slightly to allow me to do this.  And the one sister-in-law who had seen the show previously who swapped seats with me for the Second Act is certainly getting a bigger/better Christmas pressie this year!!!

 

(The show was fabulous despite Mr Fidget.)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/05/2018 at 10:38, Fiz said:

I’ve only done it once, when we saw Johan Kobborg and Alina Cojacaru’s extraordinary “Mayerling” but so did the whole theatre.

Ditto, plus their last night at ROH and Edward Watson opening night of Mayerling five years ago.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ballettaxi said:

I know this has already been mentioned on numerous occasions earlier in this thread - but why do people have to continuously fidget and shift their weight from one side of their seat to the other.  Very, very annoying for those sitting directly behind them!!! :angry:

 

I had the unfortunate pleasure (!) of having one such individual sit in front of me last night at a performance of Wicked at the Edinburgh Playhouse.  This man didn't sit in one position for more than 2 minutes.

 

Having arrived minutes before curtain up he completely burst my wonderful cosy little bubble than I was about to have an entirely unimpinged view of the performance.  He wasn't overly tall so I thought it probably would be okay, but no!!!

 

Thankfully I was able to have a quick, sneaky, look behind me and realised that the patrons behind me were exceptionally tall and had no problem seeing over my head, so I was able to adjust my viewing line as necessary to enable me to see something.

 

As I had a sister-in-law on either side of me I was able to encroach on their space slightly to allow me to do this.  And the one sister-in-law who had seen the show previously who swapped seats with me for the Second Act is certainly getting a bigger/better Christmas pressie this year!!!

 

(The show was fabulous despite Mr Fidget.)

 

Happened to me a few years ago when I was in stalls row C at the ROH for Romeo and Juliet.  The man in front of me just could NOT sit still, bobbing his head all over the place.  The only person in front of him was a tiny elderly lady who didn't move a muscle.  I missed most of the first act because of his head which ended up blocking my sightline of 80% of the stage.

 

In the interval, I asked if he could please sit still for the second half.  He said "But I can't see unless I move around".  😐 I said "Well I can't see either and the lady in front of you isn't moving".  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, penelopesimpson said:

Ditto, plus their last night at ROH and Edward Watson opening night of Mayerling five years ago.  

 

Not to mention Ed Watson closing night of his first run of Mayerling - a Bank Holiday Monday evening, with quite a few non-regulars in the audience, was my impression.  I was definitely giving him a standing ovation for that one, although since I'd been in stalls circle standing for the entire performance I guess nobody could tell :) 

 

This brings me on to the question of what we should do if the currency of standing ovations has been hugely devalued by overuse.  Sitting ovations? :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Legseleven said:

Did he sit still after the interval, Anna? 

 

Yep. I felt like asking him for a refund for the first half. ☺️

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×