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Found 47 results

  1. Paris Opera Ballet: Thanks, Bruce! I'm not sure what the geographic spread of these outside France is, but thought we should record it anyway.
  2. For immediate release 31 January 2019 Northern Ballet to go live on the silver screen [Download high resolution images] Dracula LIVE in cinemas 31 October 2019 Victoria in cinemas 25 June 2019 Northern Ballet is to make its live cinema debut with David Nixon OBE’s Dracula streamed direct to cinemas from the newly redeveloped Leeds Playhouse on Halloween. In addition, Northern Ballet has also announced that Cathy Marston’s Victoria will be screened in cinemas on 25 June 2019 following the ballet’s world première tour. Both productions will be available in cinemas throughout the UK and marks Northern Ballet’s first venture into cinema with its full-length productions. This announcement follows Northern Ballet’s cinema debut at the weekend with children’s ballet Tortoise & the Hare. This is due to be followed by screenings of two more of the Company’s children’s ballets, meaning that Northern Ballet will offer a total of five different ballets for cinema audiences during its first year of presenting its productions on the silver screen. David Nixon OBE, Artistic Director of Northern Ballet, said: ‘As the widest touring ballet company in the UK, Northern Ballet goes further to provide world-class ballet on the doorsteps of people throughout the UK. However, it is not possible to reach everybody with our live tour and so I am delighted that we will be offering Victoria and Dracula to cinema audiences throughout the country to enable even more people to access our productions. We pride ourselves on being innovative storytellers, pushing the boundaries of what stories can be told through dance and these two ballets are excellent demonstrations of that. In the hands of one of the most exciting choreographers of today, Cathy Marston’s Victoria takes the life of one of our most iconic monarchs and presents her story in a way never seen before. Whilst Draculasees Bram Stoker’s legendary vampire brought to the stage in a ballet full of sensuality and darkness; perfect viewing for Halloween. We hope that through these cinema screenings, not only will ballet fans have more opportunities to see us perform but that others who may have never seen a ballet before will give it a try and discover a new passion for our art form.’ John Travers, Head of Distribution for CinemaLive, said: ‘For over 10 years now, CinemaLivehave been providing audiences worldwide with access to incredible events through their local cinema. We are delighted to be working in partnership with Northern Ballet to distribute these two exciting productions to cinemas in 2019. Their innovative approach to storytelling looks beyond traditional ballet titles and we are proud to bring this unique and inventive content to the big screen. We look forward to seeing both Victoria and Dracula connect with cinema audiences across the UK and Ireland this year.’ This new project has been made possible by the support of Northern Ballet’s longstanding sponsors first direct bank. Joe Gordon, Head of first direct, said: ‘As proud digital pioneers ourselves, first direct is thrilled to support Northern Ballet’s new digital programme and become their National Stage & Screen Sponsor. It will bring their world-class dance and passionate storytelling to diverse new audiences around the UK and represents an exciting evolution for our new innovative partnership.’ Tickets for Victoria and Dracula in cinemas are on sale now. To find your closest participating cinemas and to book tickets visit northernballet.com/cinema -ENDS- Northern Ballet Cinema Screenings (Full-length) Victoria 25 June 2019 (One night only) Cinemas nationwide northernballet.com/cinema Dracula (LIVE) 31 October 2019 (One night only) Cinemas nationwide northernballet.com/cinema Northern Ballet Cinema Screenings (Children’s) Tortoise & the Hare From 26 January 2019 Cinemas nationwide northernballet.com/cinema Elves & the Shoemaker From 23 February 2019 Cinemas nationwide northernballet.com/cinema Three Little Pigs From 23 March 2019 Cinemas nationwide northernballet.com/cinema Northern Ballet Artistic Director – David Nixon OBE Northern Ballet is one of the UK’s leading ballet companies and the widest touring ballet company in the UK. Bold and innovative in its approach, Northern Ballet is prolific at creating new full-length work with a unique blend of strong classical technique and world-class storytelling. Northern Ballet’s repertoire embraces popular culture and takes inspiration from literature, legend, opera and the classics, pushing the boundaries of what stories can be told through dance. A champion for the cultural exports of the North, Leeds-based Northern Ballet is dedicated to bringing world-class story ballets to as many people and places as possible, under the leadership of Artistic Director David Nixon OBE. Northern Ballet’s Company of 43 dancers performs a combination of its full-length ballets and specially created ballets for children at more than 40 venues annually. For more details of Northern Ballet's tour, on sale dates and booking information, please visit northernballet.com/whatson National Stage & Screen Sponsor Image: Abigail Prudames and Mlindi Kulashe at Everyman Cinema Leeds. Photo Justin Slee.
  3. Ralph Fiennes is to direct “The White Crow,” written by David Hare, which centers on the life of Russian ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev. http://variety.com/2017/film/global/ralph-fiennes-rudolph-nureyev-the-white-crow-1201977389/
  4. NEW ADVENTURES PRODUCTION OF MATTHEW BOURNE’S SWAN LAKE IN CINEMAS NATIONWIDE ON 21 MAY Running time 130 mins / BBFC TBC / Released in cinemas nationwide 21 May 2019 UK, London: Thursday 31 January 2019, 12.00noon – More2Screen is delighted to announce that the legendary and award-winning dance production, Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake, will be screened in cinemas nationwide on Tuesday 21 May 2019. Matthew Bourne commented: "I’m thrilled that this brand-new production of my Swan Lake will be in cinemas across the UK from 21 May. It has become a modern classic much beloved by the British public and throughout the world. Its popularity has never been greater and several generations of audiences have been inspired and moved by its universal story of love and acceptance. Now 24 years after Swan Lake was first performed more people than ever before will be able to experience the dramatic power and mesmerising performances on the big screen." New Adventures production of Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake comes to cinemas with a fresh look for the 21st century and is as daring and beautiful as ever. This thrilling, audacious and witty production is perhaps still best known for replacing the female corps-de-ballet with a menacing male ensemble, which shattered convention, turned tradition upside down and took the dance world by storm. Retaining the iconic elements of the original staging loved by millions around the world, Matthew Bourne and award-winning designers Lez Brotherston (Set & Costumes) and Paule Constable (Lighting) have created a stunning re-imagining of this classic New Adventures production. Filmed live at Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London, in January 2019, Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake stars Will Bozier as The Swan/The Stranger, Liam Mower as The Prince and Nicole Kabera as The Queen. Collecting over thirty international accolades including an Olivier Award and three Tonys on Broadway, Matthew Bourne’s powerful interpretation of Tchaikovsky’s masterpiece is a passionate and contemporary Swan Lake for our times. Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake is directed for the screen by Ross MacGibbon and produced by Illuminations. It is being screened in cinemas worldwide by More2Screen, a leading Event Cinema distributor based in London. For more information and to book cinema tickets visit swanlakecinema.com #SwanLakeCinema ********* CREDITS Cast The Swan/The Stranger – Will Bozier The Prince – Liam Mower The Queen – Nicole Kabera The Girlfriend – Katrina Lyndon The Private Secretary – Glenn Graham Production Director & Choreographer – Matthew Bourne Set & Costumes – Lez Brotherston Lighting Designer – Paule Constable Sound Designer – Ken Hampton Music composed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky NOTES TO EDITORS About Matthew Bourne’s New Adventures New Adventures is an iconic and ground-breaking British dance-theatre company, famous for telling stories with a unique theatrical twist. For over 30 years Matthew Bourne and New Adventures have delighted, inspired and nurtured people of all ages and backgrounds: audiences, artists and the next generation. We create world class productions and engaging projects, reaching thousands worldwide every year. New Adventures has received numerous international awards and an incredible 12 Olivier Award nominations, including 6 wins. Over the past 30 years New Adventures has created 11 full-length productions and a triple-bill of short works. This award-winning repertoire has inspired and thrilled millions of people worldwide. In 2019 the company premieres its 12th full-length production, Romeo and Juliet. Investing in the future of dance and theatre, New Adventures engages in inclusive projects with thousands of people of all ages and ability, as well as emerging artists across the UK and around the world. https://new-adventures.net/ About More2Screen More2Screen is a leading distributor of Event Cinema with an unparalleled reputation among its blue-chip partners for professionalism, responsiveness and the delivery of great cinema events to audiences around the world for a maximum commercial return. Founded in 2006 by CEO Christine Costello, it has been a global pioneer in the harnessing of digital technology to bring the very best in live music, performance arts and cultural entertainment to local cinema audiences. In collaboration with its stellar list of long-standing content partners, More2Screen has acted as consultants, producers and worldwide distributors in bringing over 150 ‘special event’ productions to its network of more than 7,000 cinemas in 65+ international territories. Its extensive catalogue of world-class productions from across the cultural spectrum is second to none and includes many sector ‘firsts’. More2Screen is proud to have been named Global Box Office Award winner in 2014, 2015 and 2018, and winner of the inaugural Best European Distributor award in 2015 (Event Cinema Association). A Screen International Screen Awards finalist in 2015, 2016 and 2017, More2Screen won the Screen Award ‘Event Cinema Campaign of the Year’ category in 2018 for the live broadcast of the musical Everybody’s Talking About Jamie. www.more2screen.com
  5. It was good to see the Bolshoi's La Sylphide- a ballet I haven't seen for years, with the most beautiful woodland set from Peter Farmer. We were told that Johann Kobborg was watching this, his production, from a cinema in London. Worth it anyway for Semyon Chudin with his lovely line, impeccable feet and that lopsided smile. Does anyone know what went wrong in the interviews? Anna Balukova (Madge) was being interviewed by Katie Novikova , but with her eyes constantly in the wings and a growing sense of unease, and then she cut the question short rather brusquely, it seemed, and dashed off. A bit disconcerting.
  6. I thought I should start this thread in here, given the number of parents of young dc who post here: Northern Ballet's child-friendly Hare & the Tortoise is on in UK cinemas later this month. These are the Odeon showings: Hare & Tortoise And Picturehouses: https://www.picturehouses.com/cinema/Stratford_London/film/bite-sized-ballets-tortoise-and-the-hare
  7. This has been referred to on other threads but I thought it merited a separate discussion as it is an interesting initiative in its own right, especially in the context of 'open up'. I was fortunate to see the live rely of The Nutcracker and, last night, a repeat of the Lamb/Muntagirov Manon which is to be issued as a DVD/BluRay. But there have been, and will be, other ballets (Osipova/Acosta in Giselle, Cuthbertson/Bonelli in Romeo and Juliet, Nunez/Muntagirov in Swan Lake etc) and operas. The Linbury environment seems ideal for such screenings and it is a nice touch to have introductory interviews with dancers (last night Hirano rather than Lamb as advertised). Most of what is being shown has been out on DVD/BluRay for some time. However, the 'big screen' is a very different experience and what I value especially is the opportunity to watch a ballet that way at a bit of a distance from the live relay and the actual run of the production. One comes to it with a fresh eye in all sorts of ways. It was again noticeable last night that there were many in the audience who were new to the ROH, new to the RB and new to Manon - tick. Tickets were cheaper than in most cinemas - tick. Screenings must surely be cost-effective for the ROH and easily mounted - tick. What is shown is 'played straight': just an intro to the ROH, then straight into the performance, with only one short interval - tick. There are some 'wrinkles' with The Linbury so I'm now turning to my e-mail to customer services. But I count this Cinema Festival as a success for 'Open Up' and look forward to more such seasons.
  8. Original post deleted because the link given below is far more useful than my list of dates alone was.
  9. Well, it will soon be time for my Mayerling fix (!) and I have tickets for all three Watsons. But I would like to see somebody else and seem to remember forum members raving about Bonelli and Morera. Am I right? Oh, and does anyone know if Ed Watson is fit again??????????
  10. For anyone who is interested, Thiago Soares has posted on his Facebook page Dear friends, I'd love to see you all on the 7th of November at 7pm @regentstreetcinema for the special screening of ‘Primeiro Bailarino’ a film by @brgfel @losbragas @hbolatam @reetamoreeyes @alicebraga_oficial and I will be chatting to @gwdancewriter afterwards and would love you all to join.
  11. Have just seen on the BBC news that Akram Khan is creating his first full classical ballet with a new version of Giselle. It is being made for ENB in co-production with Sadler's Wells and the Manchester International Festival and will open in Manchester next year. I can't find anything else about it as yet. Does anyone know more?
  12. The Merry Widow is venerable in Australian Ballet terms. It was the first full length ballet comissioned by TAB in 1975, the gift ... it turned out to be the parting gift ... of Robert Helpman. (Helpman for me will always be the chivalrous, courteous and dignified Don Quixote of Nureyev's filmed production with TAB. Deluded, yes, but dignified. For me, no other Don Quixote comes near him.) But back to the Merry Widow. It's a glorious romp, Deceptively complex choreography (Ronald Hynd), sumptuously costumed, to great music (thank you John Lanchbery, who did a seamless job of rearranging Franz Lehar's music) and wonderfully danced. The night I attended, Hanna Glawari was danced by Kirsty Martin. Who? Oh, shame. Kirsty Martin turns out to be, not a principal dancer, but perhaps the principal dancer of TAB ten years ago. Retiring in 2011, she now teaches at the Australian Ballet's school, and came back for two performances of this ballet. Her return was facilitated by the fact that, although Marilyn Rowe was the first Hanna (and was repetiteur for the present production), Hanna's role was also designed with an aging Margot Fonteyn, who danced the role in the New York premiere in 1976, in mind. Together, seasoned principal Adam Bull and Martin gave us a couple by turns astonished, hurt, flirtatious and finally, recognizing their love. Leanne Stojmenov, as Valencienne and Andrew Killian, as Camille, were delightful, as was Colin Peasley as Valencienne's elderly husband. Colin first danced the husband's role at the premiere in 1975, and has danced it many many times since. Gives a whole new meaning to growing into a role. An amazing wealth of dance styles, from waltzes, polonaise, and mazurkas (why do mythical ballet kingdoms always get placed somewhere in eastern Europe? How about central Asia, for once? Great dances and no mazurkas) finishing with a great cancan (Chez Maximes) and a final delicious waltz which resolves everything and gives us a happy ending. I cannot tell a lie. I went along with no great expectations, and was completely won over. It may be fluff, but it's great fluff.
  13. I am so disappointed. When we first started watching the live stream of the Royal Ballet it was affordable. We went to see all of them. It is now over £20 a ticket. We will not be going anymore.
  14. We don't appear to have an overarching thread for next season's cinema ballet broadcasts, so here it is! Details of the Bolshoi season are here: Do we have the Royal Ballet details anywhere yet? I can't find them.
  15. The Bolshoi cinema broadcasts for 2017-18 have been announced: 22 OCTOBER 2017 Le Corsaire Live from Moscow 26 NOVEMBER 2017 The Taming of the Shrew Captured live on Jan 24, 2016 17 DECEMBER 2017 The Nutcracker Captured live on Dec 21, 2014 21 JANUARY 2018 Romeo and Juliet New production Live from Moscow 04 FEBRUARY 2018 The Lady of the Camellias Captured live on Dec 06, 2015 04 MARCH 2018 The Flames of Paris New production Live from Moscow 08 APRIL 2018 Giselle Captured live on Oct 11, 2015 10 JUNE 2018 Coppélia Live from Moscow The information gathered from the Pathe website (in english): http://www.pathelive.com/programme/the-bolshoi-ballet-2017-2018-1#programme The french version has more info on the individual productions at present, I don't read french so I don't know why The Flames of Paris is down as a new production. The Romeo & Juliet is by Ratmansky, so new to the Bolshoi.
  16. The Bolshoi's season of live cinema transmissions started today with Le Corsaire. Please use this thread to discuss the performances. I have to say, I thought the production looked stunning on screen, and that the dancers were generally framed pretty well - no parts of bodies escaping the frame during the dancing. I was a little surprised to find two dancers being interviewed about the roles of Conrad and Medora and then two completely different dancers performing the roles, though! Oh, and I still covet those beautiful white tutus from the Jardin Anime scene, even more so having seen them up close
  17. Just found this while hunting around the Greenwich Picturehouse site. I'm assuming it will be on elsewhere at some stage: https://www.picturehouses.com/cinema/Greenwich_Picturehouse/film/the-opera-house
  18. This opened last night with a stunning first performance. I loved it. More thoughts from me when I've seen other casts.
  19. At the screening of The Flames of Paris today the cinema screenings for next season were shown. November 11, 2018 LA SYLPHIDE December 2, 2018 DON QUIXOTE (repeat) December 23, 2018 THE NUTCRACKER January 20, 2019 LA BAYADERE March 10, 2019 THE SLEEPING BEAUTY (repeat) April 7, 2019 THE GOLDEN AGE May 19, 2019 CARMEN SUITE PETRUSHKA
  20. Interesting: "Dir Birgitte Stærmose Prod Peter Ålbæk Jensen, Marie Gade Dennessen Scr Kim Fupz Aakeson With Danica Curcic, Gustaf Skarsgård, Ulrich Thomsen Denmark-Sweden 2017 103min Sales TrustNordisk Showcasing a wealth of exquisite choreography and underpinned by a fine script, this provocative drama elegantly probes the nature of creative collaboration and the passage of success. International superstar ballerina ‘Darling’ (Danica Curcic) and her husband Frans (Gustaf Skarsgård, Vikings) return to the Royal Danish Ballet company in Copenhagen where Darling is to dance the lead in Giselle. The production, choreographed by Frans, is highly anticipated by the company and the couple themselves, for whom the job is all consuming – perhaps offering the only space where they can truly thrive together. Unquestionably talented but dangerously obsessive, Darling has already pushed herself beyond her limits, and her uncompromising behaviour threatens what promised to be a highpoint in her and Frans’ professional and personal lives. Curcic’s physically and emotionally powerful performance, guided by Birgitte Stærmose’s empathetic but always precise direction, provides an exhilarating depiction of creativity and the pressures of performance." Anyone know any more about this? It's on at the Curzon Mayfair as part of the BFI London Film Festival next month.
  21. Sounds ... different: Dir-Scr-Prod Superflex Denmark 2017 69min Prod Co Superflex A work of staggering ambition in production and storytelling that matches the stature of its controversial subject – one of Europe’s most contentious building projects. The Mærsk Opera is a musical reworking of the machinations behind the construction of the giant edifice of Copenhagen’s new opera house. It was donated to the city of Copenhagen by the late Mærsk McKinney-Møller, the world’s largest shipping owner and Denmark’s richest man. But there were conditions. It had to be built in the harbour on the sightline between a famous church and the royal palace. The musical composition by Anders Monrad, with libretto by Nikolaj Heltoft, brings to life a cast of characters both real and imaginary. The film deploys an incredible array of techniques, from animation to documentary, to tell this tale of hubris and hypocrisy which witnesses government officials and a city’s population seduced by the grand ambitions of the global capitalist.
  22. A woman who in many ways changed the face of dance for me - one Wendy Whelan - is still at 46 seeking new avenues of dance. She is ever brave; ever brilliant. Her self-commissioned RESTLESS CREATURE programme comes to Sadler's Wells in July. In response to Judith Mackrell's Guardian request as to what her reading audience might like to see I finished my response by wanting to see RESTLESS CREATURE. 'One can dream, huh' I concluded. Who says dreams don't come true (Ref: last paragraph of Deborah Jowitt's wonderful and obviously very personal review: http://www.artsjournal.com/dancebeat/2013/08/restless-creature/)
  23. “Turandot”, Saturday 30th January After having to attend a funeral service for an acquaintance of Mr P we decided to distract ourselves with a visit to a cinema live broadcast of “Turandot”. As we had just seen the Rhapsody/2P relay with an audience of about 10, we were surprised to find a packed cinema. Turandot is a production by Franco Zeffirelli from 1987 and I’ve never seen a stage so overdecorated and cramped. I can’t imagine how, if sitting high up in the auditorium, one could manage to find the leading characters if they weren’t placed front and middle (as they were most of the time). Such an overwhelming amount of extras, dancers and props! But I must admit, the camera work was very good in concentrating on the important actions, much better than with the RB broadcast. The conductor was Paolo Carignani who too often preferred to push the sound level as far as possible but Nina Stemme as Turandot was of Wagnerian stance and strength and held up as the true dramatic heroine that she is even in a lavish but quite unflattering costume. Her Calaf was not as impressive (Marco Berti), he acted as if he was under-rehearsed and too often took refuge to the standard tenor moves like the single-handed throw, the double heart grasp, the two-arms-out… quite annoying. A revelation was Anita Hartig as Liu, who was able to send long, colourful, lyrical ribbons of music into the air, she really sang from her heart, I felt she was the only one who truly lived the role. She made the incredible beauty and complexity of Puccini’s music audible, and visible, too. Also very interesting was Alexander Tsymbalyuk as Timur, a beautiful voice and quite a good actor, as far as could be seen under the exaggerated make up. I find close-ups at the opera as difficult as at the ballet, particularly with an ugly pseudo chinese make-up (the three “ministers” were an especially bad example). The presenter was Renee Fleming, and she did her job with a professional friendliness (albeit with some gushing) and she obviously had much fun. Very interesting were the intervals – there were cameras onstage and we could see the changing of the scenery, what an enormous amount of work! If they were not so expensive, I’d rather like to see more of the Met broadcast events. Does anybody else go or do you stick to the ROH?
  24. A new documentary about the Opera de Paris has been in cinemas throughout France since 5th April. I saw it in Nice on Sunday. The documentary traces individuals, groups and events behind the scenes and on stage over at least one season. In doing so, it shows what I would summarise as the human side of work at an opera house – such as facial expressions of participants in discussions (e.g., expressing disagreement), worries and doubts of performers during the rehearsal process as well as the successful performance, challenging managerial aspects (dealing with a strike that has been announced for the opening night of a performance; the search to find a replacement for a lead singer for an opera at two days’ notice), the commitment and success on stage coupled with the exhaustion of a performer as soon as the artist is in the wings, etc. While I guess some French will be helpful, I think that focussing on facial expressions and the atmosphere shown might work just as well. Most of the documentary focusses on opera, with some content about POB and organisational aspects of the Opera de Paris (who sits where in the most prestigious box for the opening gala of the 2015 season; the approach to ticket prices in light of budget constraints and the need to be accessible). Specifically, in relation to opera it follows a young Russian tenor (Mikhail Timoshenko) from his successful audition for the Opera’s Academy programme, his arrival in Paris, rehearsals and coaching, some doubts, and through to a successful performance, presumably towards the end of the season a group of primary school children who come in for a monthly rehearsal in preparation for an end-of-the year concert performance in front of their proud relatives various opera rehearsals, with e.g., the conductor looking to get the sound from the orchestra that he is looking for, looking to synchronise the chorus with the lead singers, preparations for a new opera through to the successful premiere some funny aspects, too – the new opera that is being prepared involves a bull on stage. The documentary shows how the bull is chosen (pictures of a massive bull) … followed by a sequence that shows the bull in his stable with a loudspeaker a couple of yards away, playing the music of said opera at full volume, so as to get the bull acquainted with what will be happening on stage (this made me wonder whether Peregrine gets to listen to music from La fille mal gardee even now and then, or did so before the very first performance?) In relation to ballet (and to avoid a double posting in a separate part of the forum) a short extract of the defile as part of the opening gala a brief segment from La Bayadere (and showing the dancer completely exhausted once in the wings) a rehearsal extract for Millepied’s Appassionata (interrupted by him replying to an email … with the music changing dramatically to something much darker, followed by Stephane Lissner on the phone to Millepied with what sounds like an intense discussion in relation to the latter’s potential departure and as if they had a number of prior discussions whether this may happen or not, an extract from the press conference that announced Aurelie Dupont replacing Benjamin Millepied, an extract from a related announcement (and yet with different words and a different tone) by Millepied himself to the dancers, followed by the successful premiere of Appassionata in early February 2016 In case some here are in France over the Easter break ... the following link provides a list of cinemas that show the documentary plus a trailer http://www.allocine.fr/film/fichefilm_gen_cfilm=253361.html My only regret is that the staff of the Paris Opera House and the artists were not introduced by name when they first featured in the documentary e.g., with just the name and the title or role displayed on screen, as it is done in many other documentaries (the credits at the end of the documentary do provide a long list operas that featured in the documentary as well as the artists involved). I did recognise Stephane Lissner, Philippe Jordan, Benjamin Millepied and some of the dancers shown, plus I think Bryn Terfel and Toby Spence however there were many others whom I didn’t recognise. Not having the names did not prevent me from enjoying the documentary but it would have given a little more context. Though maybe that’s not an issue for those who watch opera more often than I do.
  25. Something to look forward to, depending of course on which cinemas are taking part: three Australian Ballet productions will be broadcast to 500 cinemas worldwide in October. The ballets are Ratmansky's redesigned Cinderella, David McAllister's jaw-droppingly lavish Sleeping Beauty and Peggy van Praagh's much-loved Coppelia. http://www.screendaily.com/news/cinemalive-partners-with-australian-ballet-on-trilogy-of-productions/5104519.article I'd happily pay to see all of them! I was on the verge of booking to see Cinderella at the London Coliseum next month when fate decreed that I'll be moving house on the only day I could have gone...
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