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Pointytoes

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  1. Pointytoes

    Recalls

    Our JA teachers are always so nice to soften this process. They are wonderful !
  2. Pointytoes

    Recalls

    And the fact some had to be seen later in the week as did not make the audition weekend due to the snow!
  3. Pointytoes

    Recalls

    All children still leave the aforementioned process knowing they could be a yes but ultimately still a no, but that status is no different from their arrival! This in no way changes their achievement of getting this far.
  4. Pointytoes

    Recalls

    The ballet world is a brutal business. Too many people send their children into it with a romantic and idealist view. It is important that they learn this sooner then later if they stand any chance in such a competitive business. There isn’t anything indiscrete about the process at all, the checking process could be something very minor and ultimately parents should welcome this. A yes is a yes however the decision is taken. The urban myths of a brutal process must rather be seen as a meticulous one rather than dramatise a much needed procedure. The term ‘ living the dream’ should be put to rest but enabling young artistic atheltes to pursue an obsession perhaps more realistic. There will always be bumps along the way. We need to enable our young dancers to be resilient to compete post 16 and mentally strong, not wrap them in cotton wool!
  5. Pointytoes

    Recalls

    There is the million dollar question!There were a limited number of girls last year who were not needed in call backs with a definite yes. The call backs were made up of pupils with something to check. Some of these call backs ended up as no’s and the rest yeses. You could speculate forever! No call back means they are very clear about suitability for their training. Good luck to those waiting.
  6. If there were more it must be remembered some girls were auditioning for other years.
  7. Last year there were two groups indeed of year 7 girls on rotation throughout the day but there was definitely not more than 35 to forty girls in attendance. Some had dropped out. I cannot comment on the boys sorry.
  8. Hi , I Can perhaps help with both questions. Last year there were approximately 30 pupils auditioning for year 7. The current year 9 is one of the largest year groups. I can’t comnent on availability of beds as some years have more pupils than others but Elmhurst seem to have the ability to find space if they need it and usually try to fill their MDS spaces. Hope this helps.
  9. I agree these vocational students do cope well in general with appraisals especially when you read the Frenzie that happens each year on here trying to find out if there are beds, places etc at White Lodge. I have a child there and I still find it incredible that parents are hoping their children gain a place by discussing beds, spaces or assessing out. If they want your dancer they want them and that is it! No point in going round in circles. There are many paths to Rome and it’s all hard work!
  10. Not sure, Birmingham girls results are out for year 7.
  11. I have a vocational child at Elmhurst and one in associates who also takes modern and tap at her own stage school and competes etc etc. I strongly advise that you make the decision based on what is best suited to the interests and development of your own child. Dance schools are often guilty of making parents feel that unless completely committed to them your child will not progress. As a previous post has pointed out modern and tap classes can be accomadated and sourced else where....where else do you source an Elmhurst associate place that she has earned? Sorry I know this sounds opinionated but it frustrates me when parents are made to feel this way.
  12. Hi, she heading into year 5 in September and is of very slim build and 138cm in height. Thank you.
  13. Anyone selling or willing to sell RBS JA blue character skirt?
  14. A lot if the above comments are very true, I was, and to a certain extent still am a 'festival parent' and while I have loved to sit and watch my child pick up many awards including All England finals titles, it was my husband who needed to point out to me that they had become involved in an obsessive trail of trophy hunting. My child had been saying its ballet and only ballet I want and she was becoming a great festival child, a jack of all trades but master of none as he had put it. The fear was that she had become too 'festivilsed' ( no such word I know) and this would be viewed poorly in the ballet world. We pulled her out a year ago, and it was just ballet through audition time. Festival children are not viewed in a very positive light in the purist world of ballet. More importantly her physique and facility were correct and she begins her vocational ballet life in September. Festivals have their place but they are generally not comparable to the ballet world, and whilst great fun and friendships can be made in the correct environment they can also become very time and money consuming without a real focus long term.
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