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penelopesimpson

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  1. penelopesimpson

    Emma Maguire (Royal Ballet)

    That is a wonderful photograph. She looks so serene and pretty.
  2. Glad it wasn't just me, Irmgard! It is almost sacrilege to not be wowed by Alina and, in many ways, I was. But the overwhelming emotion she usually evokes in me just didn't happen. However, I did like her partnership with Caley and thought there was a lovely connection.
  3. No, me neither. It wasn’t that the set was not detailed enough, rather more that the dancers seemed dwarfed by the auditorium. That is probably me because I am such an I frequent visitor. I do agree with you that one noticed the choreography so much more.
  4. I don’t often go to The Colisseum but this was Alina Cojocaru. it was good. There was a lot to like but for me it was not more than the sum of its parts. Alina is still wonderful, as sinuous as molten chocolate. Loved Josephm Caley who had humanity and an appealing vulnerability - shades of Muntagirov. Jeffrey Cirio, bone thin, danced like a rapier on speed and is one to watch. But...the set for Act 1 is too bare and looks sparse on The Colisseums vast stage, and the huge auditorium doesn’t give it the claustrophobic feel that I think Manon and Mayerling both need. I am still in mourning for Cojocaru and Kobborg so it is painful for me to say I was disappointed. Alina was wonderful with sublime dancing but the lady I always thought of as her successor, Francesca Hayward, is now the real deal forManon.. Nothing wrong with Alina, it’s just that she doesn’t seem to have developedsince she left RB. Is it too late for KOH to invite her back so that she can fulfil her full potential? She needs to be challenged, I think. For anyone thinking of getting tickets, you will not be disappointed. She is still light as air and on another level to most. It is probably unfair that I was expecting more...
  5. penelopesimpson

    Polunin (not) to guest in POB

    Well, quiet. There is really something quite tragic watching one of the greats slowly dying in front of you. At SW I was too shocked to laugh and too sad to cry.
  6. penelopesimpson

    Polunin (not) to guest in POB

    Think Mark Monaghan absolutely hits the spot. This silly boy could have had it all. Apart from fame, I don’t think he has a clue what he does want. When he flounced out of RB, we got a lot of guff about his need for artistic freedom. Well, Project Polunin at SW was a lot of things, (most of them acutely embarrassing bordering on laughable), but artistic it was not. Contrast that with what John Curry created. I trust Osipova is keeping her distance.
  7. I say this as a huge Acosta fan and love the idea of his being back in the UK and working with a ballet company, but is this really such a great idea? He will surely be tempted into choreography which is definitely NOT his forte. I worry about what he is actually going to do and would hate him to fail.
  8. I have a ticket for Alina on Wednesday. Please tell me she is still dancing....?
  9. penelopesimpson

    Polunin (not) to guest in POB

    Perhaps Siegfried was a Putin supporter? Who knows? Anything is possible in the la-la land that Polunin inhabits
  10. penelopesimpson

    Bolshoi Ballet London Tour Summer 2019

    Well, that is all very spectacular and I'm sure it's amazingly difficult, but... I found it completely unappealling and more suited to a circus. Reminds me of ice dancers who are really jumping machines where there is little poise or elegance of movement between the jumps. Give me Edward Watson and all the other RB dancers any day.
  11. penelopesimpson

    Polunin (not) to guest in POB

    Sim: Too late, already. I have railed against Polunin for some time but my anger was always based on sorrow. As we've often discussed, nobody has to do anything just because they have a talent for it, but to throw something so wonderful away and wreck your life almost simultaneously seems tragic. It was always clear that Sergei, perhaps more than most, desperately needed the discipline and rigour of belonging to a major dance company and that without that routine, he would implode. Since leaving he has flitted from one thing to the next, all the time denigrating anybody and anything connected with ballet. He has had his five minutes of fame so many times; a walk-on here, a photocall there, a starlet who used to be a star and whose light is fading fast.
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